Find Quilts Around the World on Instagram

ReannaLily Designs Profile Pic on Instagram - Jen Eskridge

Customize an International Instagram Feed!

Instagram is a wonderful photo-based networking platform perfect for creative inspiration. Of course, Instagram has gone through many changes over the years but there are still ways to see your favorite content. Make your instagram feed international by including hashtags from many other languages. Today, I want to share with you my trick for seeing quilts from all over the world.

Hashtags

First, lets talk hashtags. If you don’t already know, a hashtag is a # symbol followed by words that basically creates an imaginary folder (and automatic search filter) for everyone to use.  Instagram and Twitter seem to be the primary users of social hashtags.

Hashtags in Profile

Instagram has allowed users to add hashtags into their profiles. In my own profile, I’ve added #reannalilydesigns to see all posts about my business & folks making things from my patterns, #reannalilyquilts to feature things I’ve quilted for myself or others, and #fmfwq & #freemotionframework to showcase all the projects and promotions for the new book, Free-Motion Framework. On someone’s profile page, you can click on any hashtag to see more images with that tag.

Hashtags in Photo Descriptions

An instagram user may also add any kind of hashtag into their image description. Just like hashtags in a profile, you can click on one to see more similar images from anyone on the internet.

These were used on a recent customer’s gorgeous quilt. Her Metro Rings quilt was made using the Quick Curve Ruler, so I thought it’d be fun to associate the posts with other image that have used the same ruler and other machine quilting hashtags:  #quickcurveruler#customerquilt#loveit, #reannalilyquilts, #reannalilydesigns, #ilovemyjob, #longarmquilting, #machinequilting, #freemotionquilting, #quiltedfeathers, #feathers, #sewkindofwonderful, #fmq, #freemotionquilting#dwrquilt, #doubleweddingring

*Note- In the actual description, you don’t need commas between hashtags.

Customize Your International Instagram Feed

Armed with the information on hashtags, it got me thinking: I should search for tags in other languages. Unfortunately, I don’t know any other languages fluently. (Does sarcasm and pig latin count? No.)

Google Translate to the rescue! Now sure, Google Translate is sometimes a disaster, but it does know more than I do when it comes to quilty vocabulary. I started here, with Spanish:

Google Translate Quilting to Spanish

Ok, now I have a word to grow search and browse. You don’t need the right word, or the most trending word, you just need a starting point. Just like on my own photo description, I used similar tags like #longarmquilting,  #machinequilting, #freemotionquilting, the odds are someone using the #acolchado tag may also have related words.

  • Type the new-to-you hashtag in to the search bar on Instagram.
  • Scroll through to see images that appeal to you.
  • Click the photo to see more hashtags in the description.
  • Select a few hashtags by clicking on them to see what comes up.
  • Follow any hashtags you find appealing by clicking the blue “follow” button at the top of your mobile device.

In this case, #acolchado yields commercial bedding, though I found a hand-made machine quilted image that also contained the hashtag #patchdelourdes. Click it. I also typed it in to translate, and it means “heavy patch.” Ok. Sure thing. That hashtag has much more quilty images for me. The cycle begins…

ReannaLily Designs Profile Pic on Instagram - Jen Eskridge - Learn to see Quilts in from other countries on Instagram

Now see at the top of the screen where it says “Follow” on the blue button? Click it and you’ll get to see new images when someone uses the hashtag you just decided to follow. It is awesome. This button doesn’t appear on your pc or computer, only tablet & mobile, I believe.

One thing to note is the number of instances that hashtag occurs. In this case, 223. You find tags that have hundreds of thousands and you may find tags with 10-20. Pick what you like, and if you start seeing less-fun or less-inspiring posts, simply unfollow that tag for a while.

What I Follow

As of right now, here are just a few hashtags I’m following:

Note: It looks like the special characters from other languages aren’t showing up on mobile devices  if you click the links, they’ll still open correctly in Instagram.

The possibilities are endless! Those can get you started. Good luck!! Of course, you can do this with any hobby or interest. You will find some fantastic projects out there!

If you are bilingual or follow quilty & sewing hashtags from another languauge, I’d love to see them! Share them in the comments.

 

 




Green and Orange Scrap Quilt Wall Hanging

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily QuiltsScrap Quilt: Wall hanging

Today, I’d like to share my recent scrap quilt finish. As you know, I enjoy a good scrap quilt! This small wall hanging is was originally set to be two colors: orange and green. I decided early on, though, that I’d like the greens to move from light to dark outward from the center.

Starting with many fabric pieces I made little sections of fabric large enough for each template. This is the technique of Made Fabric that Victoria Findlay Wolfe uses in her book, 15 Minutes of Play. I used a triangle template for the greens and a diagonal 6″ wide template for the orange. I don’t have the templates to share today, but they are easy to make.

Making Templates

Supplies

  • Blank Paper or Scratch Paper
  • Ruler
  • Scotch Tape
  • Pencil

Drafting

  • Tape sheets of paper larger than your finished block size. I opted to create my blocks to be 15″ square when finished.
  • Draw a 15″ square in the center of the page.
  • Add a 1/4″ seam allowance around the entire square.
  • Lightly draw a diagonal line from one corner to the other.
  • Measure and draw a line 3″ to the right and left of the diagonal to create a 6″ diagonal bar.
  • Cut the paper apart on the diagonal drawn lines.
  • Tape paper behind the new cut to add 1/4″ seam allowances.

This technique works for any shape and for any size. If you want your diagonal bar to be 2″ wide, you can do it. If you’d like to make the block more complicated, try that, too.
Draw. Cut. Seam Allowance.

How It Started

I didn’t always love the quilt. I started thinking the contrast between green and orange would be enough to make this quilt visually “work.” Boy, I was wrong. Check out the left side of the quilt.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Each block is 15-1/2″ square, but it wasn’t until I added in little black strips did the quilt start to pop. Those lines give the eyes somewhere to rest in this sea of green and orange.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Of course, now the blocks do not measure 15-1/2″. That is alright, I’d just have to cut them down a bit before adding them together.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

This quilt lived on my design wall for quite a while before deciding to add more fabric, or simply quilt and finish it. I opted for the later. Maybe because it was a gift? Maybe because it was a creative-block? Either way, no other fabrics were added. I was ready to load this guy onto the longarm.

Machine Quilting

So much thinking and over-thinking went into the quilting design of this project. Thankfully, once I started, it became clear that the quilting really didn’t show up that well on so many wild fabrics. I could quilt anything I wanted and didn’t have to go back to the over-thinking step. Wahoo! The orange bands all have the same meander design and each green area, light, medium and dark, have different filling designs.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

And as you’d expect, the plain white back really showcases the quilt design.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

This gift has been shared with its new owner, the college student who will be attending school with these colors. She was surprised even though she saw me working on it for the past few weeks. Funny how that works out, right? She says she didn’t put it together that it was her college colors until I told her.




Free-Motion Framework Book Tour Winners

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Thank you!

Thank you for following along with the Free-Motion Framework Social Media Blitzo and Book Tour. I appreciate each of you for stopping by and seeing how this little book came together. Today, I’m happy to announce the three prize winners on ReannaLily Designs stop along the tour.

Just a quick update, if you don’t yet have your copy of the book, the book is rolling along smoothly and is included in the C&T Publishing Best Sellers. Holy smokes! What an honor, y’all!

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Here’s a quick recap of the tour stops:

Monday | June 4

ReannaLily Designs (here!) 
C & T Publishing

Tuesday | June 5

Joey’s Quilting Co
Helen Ernst Longarm Quilting
Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC The Blog

Thursday | June 7

Wise Craft Handmade

Friday | June 8

Kustom Kwilts
Living Water Quilter
Seamingly Slawson Quilts – Susan Lawson

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Congratulations to our Winners


First Prize

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The first prize includes the following sponsored items:

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The first prize goes to Christi! Her comment is, “I need to improve all of my skills. Ruler work has caught my attention but so has feathers. I haven’t mastered either one. Each day I practice both and dream of improving.” Look for an email soon!


Second Prize

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The first prize includes the following sponsored items:

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The second prize goes to Carol. Her comment is, “I would like to improve the consistency of my stitch length when doing FMQ.” Look for an email soon!


Third Prize

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The third prize goes to Susan. Her comment is, “I’m struggling in vision. Need a new look.” Look for an email soon!


Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.

Thanks again! You can always read up on the title at these locations, and when on Instagram or Twitter, check out the hashtag #FMFWQ.

 




Fabric for Military Retirement Chevron Quilt

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That FabricCelebrating a Military Retirement

In my recent post, I shared the first quilt which celebrates a military retirement. If one quilt is good, at least two or three is better, right? This is the second military retirement quilt for another member of the family. This time, I used the Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern to make a quick quilt.

As I mention in my lectures and in the book Deploy That Fabric, when quilting, I treat the military uniform as a neutral. If green and shades of green match everything in the garden, they can match everything in a quilt. Also, the nature of camouflage is to blend in, so place it where ever you like!

Deploy That Fabric Cover

Fabrics

Working exclusively from my own fabric stash, I pull nine fabrics that measure at least 21″ x width of fabric. I spent a bit of time trying to rearrange them in a suitable order as they will stay in this order for the Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern.

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

The Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern

Using the very-fast No-Waste Flying Geese method and giant sizes listed in the free Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern, I got to work. The quilt top really does finish up in a weekend. Here are the highlights for construction:

  • Mark a diagonal line on the wrong side of all four smaller 10″ squares.
  • Lay two squares on the 19-1/4? larger square, matching right sides, to create a large diagonal line.
  • Pin pieces together, perpendicular to the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Sew 1/4? from the marked line on the right and left sides.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open the smaller triangles and press the seam allowances towards the smaller triangles. If you’ve created two slightly-weird heart shapes, you are on the right track.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Lay the remaining 10? squares on each of the larger triangle pieces; making sure the diagonal line points “deep in the heart.” Easy to remember, right?
  • Sew 1/4? from the right and left of the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.
  • Each pile of five fabric pieces will yield four large flying geese blocks.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Check out the entire free pattern here: Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern.
Next, sew the flying geese units in to nine rows.

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

Quilting

To the surprise of everyone on the planet, I didn’t take pictures while I was quilting this project. I will tell you though, quilting over the military uniform pieces was a breeze with my HandiQuilter Avante and size 110 needles. I quilted over welt seams, though I did not stitch over the name tape.

I do have one image to share with you. One photo to scare you a bit.

What you are seeing is the very bottom edge of the quilt. The entire piece was quilted with a spiked swirl edge-to-edge free-motion quilting design. I was be-boppin along, and as I came to the end of the quilt, I spent a small bit of time convincing myself that I did indeed measure the quilt back. Surely. I must have, right? Or maybe I was laying it on the floor and guessing I had enough fabric. I really wasn’t sure.

The red snapper (plastic) you see in the image allows me to load the quilt onto the frame in a matter of minutes. It is also about 3/4″ wide, for reference. I’d say I definitely got this a way too close! And in the very next breath, I’ll say, “See, look- 1 inch is plenty of room. No-Waste EVERYTHING!” *insert maniacal laughter*

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

The Quilt

The military quilt is finished and on to its new home.Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

The fabrics are quite busy, so I’m not sure how well you can see the quilting. You can see even less on the backing, this time.

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

If you need a quick project, I highly recommend the Chevron Grande Quilt PatternAnd of course, if you have an occasion to sew with military uniforms, please check out the book, Deploy That Fabric.




Fabric Scraps for Military Retirement Quilt

Adding Fabric Scraps to a Military Retirement Quilt

Thankfully, we are celebrating a retirement here in the family! How does a quilter celebrate? With a quilt, of course! The quilt is a gift for someone very close to the retiree. I hope she likes it!

Design Inspiration

Back in January, Heather Kojan on Instagram shared a photo of a blue scrap quilt. On her instagram feed, she mentions that her quilt is loosely based on a design she created for 100 Blocks years ago. My quilt is based on her single image, which is, of course, a traditional signature-style block:

The design is gorgeous and simply elegant. Scraps set on the diagonal. Of course, her scraps are much more orderly and of more uniform size, hue, and value.

The Scrap Quilt

My blue scrap pile was a big ole wild mess of color values and scrap piece sizes. I was still able to piece and create shapes from which to cut one diagonal piece and two setting triangles. The templates were created from freezer paper. My 20 blocks are 15″ square with a 6″ wide diagonal section. Since this retirement quilt celebrates 20 years in the United States Air Force, I mixed in a few pieces of military uniform, too.

My quilt is 4 blocks x 5 blocks. With borders it measures roughly 70″ x 85″.

Using the military uniform in the quilt was a no-brainer for me, since almost 10 years ago I authored the book Deploy That Fabric. Man, I love that book so much!

Deploy That Fabric CoverLongarm Quilting Design

What I didn’t do 10 years ago was longarm quilt my own military uniform + fabric quilt designs.

I was nervous, but the quilting was actually quite smooth. My basic block design features two curling feather designs in each white triangle and a wide wishbone pattern on the scrappy/military diagonal line.

This was the first time I tried curling feathers.

Thank goodness for practicing on a white board to develop muscle memory.

The diagonal wishbones were quilted in one long quilting pass. The quilt is loaded onto the frame horizontally. As in, I rotate the quilt 90 degrees from how it would lay on a bed. By doing this, I can quilt the longest pass possible and advance the quilt fewer times.

The military uniform pieces are cut from the no-longer-worn uniform shirt, complete with pockets, welt seams, and character. (aka ink pen stain). The HandiQuilter didn’t hesitate stitching over the heavy welt seams. Sewing slower helped. A nametape was added once the quilt top was complete, but there’s no way I was going to try to quilt over that.

I think this quilt will be a hit. It will be gifted before the big retirement celebration coming up. Thank you for your service!




Free-Motion Framework Book Tour

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Join the Book Tour

As you may know, my new book, Free-Motion Framework was made possible with the help of contributing quilters. A total of 17 quilters, including myself, stitched 41 quilts featured in this inspiring, machine-quilting skill-builder resource. This week we’ll hear from some of them on how the worked with the concept, interpreted their assigned designs, and how their quilts turned out.

Today kicks off the Social Media Blitzo tour for Free-Motion Framework. Stop by the blogs, listed below, to read more about the new title, and when on Instagram or Twitter, check out the hashtag #FMFWQ or #FreeMotionFramework.

The Overview

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Choose one of 10 Framework designs, or one of 12 if you have the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Sheets, to transfer onto your own 40″ square fabric using tips and instructions in the book. From here, prepare the fabric for quilting, as you would any other quilt. Choose shapes from the linear design to fill, symmetrically, with quilting designs. Practice as many design motifs as you like. Each time you create a small project, it will help grow your machine quilting skills and turn out completely different than the one you stitched before.

Note: Build your skills on a domestic or longarm sewing machine.

And, after you’ve practiced and quilted the entire piece, you’ll accidentally turn out a wholecloth quilt. Neat, right?

Longarm Quilting | ReannaLily Designs

I thought it might be fun to share the reasons you may want to keep Free-Motion Framework in your own library, and the “problems” I was trying to solve when I authored the book.

1. Quilting can be expensive.

From machines and fabric to time and planning, quilting is a luxury hobby. For a past-time that started out utilitarian, it has grown to be an amazing creative art form. Turns out, art can get pricey. I wanted to develop a way to quilt without breaking the bank. All the projects in Free-Motion Framework are presented at 40″ x 40″.  You can create a quilt using 1-1/3 yards of fabric, batting, and backing. Even better, if you were to purchase 108″ wide backing, you can create two 40″ pieces from the one back. Sure you can make larger quilts by combining designs or adding a variety of your own border designs to the 40″ square “frames,” but largely the Free-Motion Framework projects can be created at a low cost.

2. I need more practice, but don’t want to commit to a big patchwork quilt.

When a person decides to start machine quilting, especially free-motion quilting, you may find that you need many more practice pieces before diving into your own beloved patchwork project. Often new quilters will take on charity quilts to stitch with one all-over design. We may also quilt bed sheets just for practice. I wanted to practice many quilting motifs while still producing something neat. Unlike practicing a single style on a “real quilt,” Free-Motion Framework presents the opportunity to create more than one fill or quilting design on the same project. By isolating shapes to essentially color in, you can try all sorts of different ideas.

In the two quilts below, notice how, by choosing different design lines/shapes and arranging different types of quilting motifs, the exact same framework, Shark Attack, turns out completely different. Each chapter has four different interpretations of the design by quilters of all skill levels and backgrounds. I think you’ll be surprised with the variety of inspiration.

3. How can I make a wholecloth quilt easily?

I know that sounds crazy, right? The idea of a Wholecloth Quilt by nature doesn’t really give off the EASY vibe. Pre-printed panels exist to create wholecloth quilts, but really, I wanted my own design. I am inspired by the incredibly talented machine quilters who spend months tweaking and perfecting their wholecloth competition quilts on paper then transfer every single stitch to a fabric design.

Do I love the look? Yes.
Would I love to plan something elaborate like that? No way.

The brainstorming began. Fundamentally, many wholecloth designs are symmetrical. Starting there, I decided if I just had some guidelines to work symmetrically, I may be able to turn out something that looks planned. That turned into: If I just had guidelines, I could fill-in whatever I wanted. I just need to remember where I stitched what motif. Using the Goals Worksheets provided with Free-Motion Framework, you’ll be able to write down the notes for the design as well as keep track of what you are practicing on each piece.

Another tip- Save the printed designs to make full-size notes while quilting. I traced a quadrant of a design four times onto fabric. With that quadrant, I loosely draw the designs as I stitch them to remember what to symmetrically stitch on the other areas of the quilt. Remember, this is just a guide, not a masterful drawing.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

4. Quilt with No Pressure

By working small and unplanned, the project takes on a freeing feeling. Working without any outside pressures is a fantastic path to self-growth. Jump in and give it a try. Free-Motion Framework is great for any skill level as everyone has room to improve that one little thing.

  • Hey, this is just 1-1/3 yard of fabric.
  • It’s only practice; no need to worry.
  • This is for my own quilting self-journey, if it turns out, cool. If not, I haven’t invested hundreds of patchwork hours (and CASH) into it.
  • I’ve always wanted to try X-Y-Z design. Let me try it in four or eight small spaces to see if I like it.
  • Rulers have always fascinated me, but I’m not sure where to start. Start one small shape at a time.
  • This will be great to work on at retreat!!! It’s small.

All in all, writing this book from concept to “holy crap that worked” to pitching to the publisher to sourcing all the many contributing quilters, this has been an amazing experience. I hope you’ll enjoy hearing all about the title on this week-long blog hop.

Stop by each blog this week for a possible chance to win a copy of Free-Motion Framework. (International winners, outside the USA, will receive a digital copy.)

Monday | June 4

ReannaLily Designs (here!) 
C & T Publishing

Tuesday | June 5

Joey’s Quilting Co
Helen Ernst Longarm Quilting
Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC The Blog

Thursday | June 7

Wise Craft Handmade

Friday | June 8

Kustom Kwilts
Living Water Quilter
Seamingly Slawson Quilts – Susan Lawson

To be considered for one of the following gifts from our sponsors, leave a comment sharing what area of machine quilting you’d most like to improve. Winners will be randomly selected and notified by email.

Clover USA | ReannaLily Designs

Handi Quilter Rulers | ReannaLily Designs

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

The prize portion of the tour will close at 5pm central time, June 18th and winners will be announced June 19th, right here on ReannaLily Designs Blog. Thank you so much for joining the Blog Tour.

See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the ReannaLily Designs blog.




Afternoon Picnic Quilt by Nancy Zieman Productions for Riley Blake

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

Custom Quilting for Riley Blake and Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC.

It was my honor to custom quilt this sample for Riley Blake Designs’ booth at Spring Quilt Market 2018. The beautiful small quilt is designed by Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC’s team and will be displayed with all the other new fabric lines launching this season.

Custom quilting is so exciting as it gives the project a whole second dimension, though technically, I supposed I should say a third dimension. Of course, there’s only a tiny bit of pressure when the quilt will be seen at the high Quilt Market level. Phew! I think it turned out alright.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

The entire design is stitched using my hand-guided HandiQuilter Avante 18, using free-motion quilting techniques and rulers.

Defining and Combining Shapes

I started first with converging straight lines in alternating blocks.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

I added pebbles in the 3″ corners of each block. They look cool, but man, as I may have mentioned before, I do not like stitching them.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

Hum. So star shapes and borders are remaining. There was some brainstorming here. Do I sub-dive the stars? Do I treat them as one shape? Should I focus on eight triangles and one square? In the end, the large star won out. I echo quilted 1/4″ from the shape’s perimeter and then filled the design with very small pointed swirls.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

Border Decisions

The border needed to be more subtle to not detract from the quilt design as a whole. The modified piano key style features a 1/4″ stitched line every inch-and-a-half or so. The ruler I used didn’t have regular measurements, but did have a printed logo. Each line jump is aligned with the printed logo. Technical, right?

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

In many cases, you will really see the quilting from the back. This is especially true if the back is a solid or tone-on-tone fabric. Here, the backing is 108″ wide Riley Blake Snow tonal fabric.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

If you are at quilt market this weekend and see this little lovely hanging in the Riley Blake Designs Booth, snap a picture for me.

If you are looking for a longarm quilter, I’m your gal! See more details at reannalilyquilts.com.

 




Intro to Free-Motion Framework: A New Workshop

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

The new book Free-Motion Framework hits stores in May! A brand new quilting workshop will also be offered. I’m so excited to share the Intro to Free-Motion Framework half-day class.  The spirit of the book focuses on challenging yourself at your own skill level and pace. It gives you an opportunity to reflect and say, “I think I’m going to practice such-and-such quilting design, and maybe also the whatever-whatever design.” Then, take those ideas and practice your quilting design symmetrically to accidentally create a wholecloth quilt.

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Just like the book, the workshop project can be completed on a longarm or domestic home sewing machine. (When booking the workshop, special arrangements may need to be set for hosting a class in a longarm studio.)

In the workshop we’ll mark a solid color fat quarter to create a 15-18″ mini quilt using the same design framework. Just like the 10 linear designs in the book, the Intro design also has its own goals worksheet to give you an opportunity to practice, take notes, and doodle before stitching.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

For the workshop, I created three samples to represent three skill levels who may try the Intro design. Of course, you do not have to make your mini quilt like these at all. Each quilter will likely turn out very different projects. (That is my favorite part!) The challenge levels are associated with these fabric colors:

  • Pink – more advanced
  • Grey – confident
  • White – beginner

In the pictures below, you’ll see the original marked lines on the finished samples. I’m hoping that will give you a reference point as to which shapes were isolated to be quilted.

Pink Mini Quilt

To create the pink mini quilt, I was able simply lay the light-colored fabric on a work surface and trace the design through the fabric.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

The water soluble pencils from Clover work great for this project; keep a pencil sharpener handy.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

I set the fat quarter up on my HandiQuilter Avante longarm frame, though this absolutely can be done on a domestic home sewing machine. (The workshop will be geared towards home-sewing-machine-based free-motion quilting.)

Starting in the center, I isolated a few shapes. I stitched ruler guided straight lines; I echoed design lines; I made feathers; I stitched tiny pebbles.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

From here, I decided I need a bit of “all-over-filler” type designs inside the circle.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

I finished by trying to make a diagonal grid behind the circle. Each quilt is a different challenge for myself. Hopefully showing all three of the same design will give you a few ideas, too.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Grey Mini Quilt

The grey fat quarter fabric was quite a bit more opaque than the pink. To trace the design, I taped the paper template to a window, then taped the fabric over it.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Again, I used the water soluble pencils from Clover.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

To create a design that was less complicated, I decided to isolate less shapes than I did in the pink mini quilt.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T PublishingFree-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

The grey mini quilt only has three total quilting designs.

  • Wishbone lines in the center square
  • Meandering in the four cardinal directions
  • Pebbles in the background

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Side story: Let’s go on record and say Pebbles are not my favorite. I can make them alright, but boy, I always regret stitching them after the first two inches. Who’s with me?

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Comparing the grey quilt to the pink one, you can see how choosing different shapes and fills makes for a unique challenge each time.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

White Mini Quilt

As you may have guessed, the white fat quarter was plenty light to see through and trace the Intro design straight onto the fabric without the window/light board set up. For this, the simplest of the three designs, I only have two fill designs: Straight lines and meandering. It stitched up so quickly that I forgot to snap any progress pictures.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing


Booking the Workshop

The Free-Motion Framework lecture and workshop are available for quilt guilds, shops, and private groups. Please see this page on my site for more information and contact me directly at reannalilydesigns@gmail.com. I cannot wait to start quilting with you.




Writing a Book- Free-Motion Framework

Bound Quilts | ReannaLily Designs

Early last year I shared a blog post vaguely mentioning my “Secret Quilting Project.” I’m happy to report I can finally elaborate on the details and explain how the logistics of authoring Free-Motion Framework went down. From timeline to work-load, here’s how it happened:

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

In late 2016, I pitched a concept to C&T Publishing to feature 10 linear designs created to help you improve your machine quilting skills while accidentally producing a wholecloth quilt.  The concept was well received. I have to say myself, I hadn’t seen anything like it in the quilting community, either. That was great news!

The publishing team and acquisitions folks chatted with me about how broad the scope would be and how much it would take to write the book. When I say “how much,” I don’t mean money; I mean time.  We discussed release-dates and other planning events way back in the fall of 2016.

My book, Free-Motion Framework, was in the incubator a bit longer than a usual book for two main reasons:

  1. My sweet husband deployed for half of 2017, and I knew I wouldn’t be able to be a quilt-author-maniac while holding down the fort.
  2. The book coordinates the efforts of generous sponsors and 17 different contributing quilters. That is a TON of quilters. Spreadsheets galore!

Once that was ironed out, I was emailing my dream-team of quilters by November. Just like hosting a party, you throw out invitations and hope everyone can attend, but realistically some folks have other commitments and a few may have to cancel their RSVP’s.  Most quilters stitched two different design projects in the book. Others volunteered to quilt three. I think I personally quilted 10 or 11. I’d have to go back and re-count.

Next up, reaching out to the amazing sponsors who provided products to help make this book a reality. Lots of emailing and lots of spreadsheets.  Thank you to these generous folks:

Fairfield Batting

Fairfield Batting | ReannaLily Designs

Clover USA

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

HandiQuilter

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Hab And Dash (previously Bobbin Central/Fil Tec)

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

And don’t forget the amazing fabric sponsors. This book was much trickier for me to plan fabric than my previous books.

In previous books, I’d design a quilt, and say “Hum, this quilt pattern needs 2 yards of blue, 10 fat quarters from this-that-matches-blue, and 6 yards of backing.” Easy stuff. For this book, I had to think, “Wait, I’m going to present a whole collection of squares, and I need the colors to match, or coordinate, or at the very least not bore anyone reading.” Yet another spreadsheet was born. Here’s a peek. Excel Spreadsheet for Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

I looked at fabric company’s websites to find beautiful anchor fabrics. From there, I decided to choose all the wholecloth color pieces from that anchor fabric. Each chapter, which is also each linear design, is coordinated by backing fabric (aka the anchor). All four quilt concepts in the chapter have the same binding, which helps tie them together and keep them organized for me and the publishing team.

Big thank you to:

My company, ReannaLily Designs, isn’t sponsored by any single fabric company, which made it easier and wonderful to work with five different companies to provide variety and selection when assembling this concept. Thank you, thank you!

Ok, with quilters assembled and supplies procured, I then needed to sort, mark, and ship everything to my team. This happened right before Christmas in 2016.

Shipping Boxes | ReannaLily Designs

 

Early 2017 was spent feverishly quilting and writing. I also needed to write the organize book, decided on some specific things that you’ll see in the table of contents, and create my work in Adobe Illustrator.

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

 

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

All quilts were returned, with contributor notes, by mid February 2017. By June the entire thing was authored and ready to send to the publisher for them to wave a magic editing-wand over the whole thing. I mailed digital files, quilts, tools, thread, paper files, more straight pins identifying samples than I care to think of, and more. It was a HUGE endeavor to get those boxes to the post office.

The final edits by the publishing team (and then a micro-tiny bit by me) were all done around Christmas 2017, with the book heading to print in early 2018. It has been a long time, but all-in-all an amazing time.  I think you will love the way the book is arranged. It is better than I could have imagined, and I’m so glad to have worked with such an accomplished group at C&T Publishing.

One cool thing about the book is that the 10 linear designs are included for download once you purchase the book. I was originally thinking a CD would be included, but y’all, that is SOOOOO 2015. Evidently everything is cloud/internet based, which is awesome. But if you were thinking you’d like to have a copy of the actual paper patterns along with your book, C&T Publishing also assembled a pattern package which includes two additional BONUS linear designs.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

It was an incredible process. I can safely say, I would love to do it again. (wink wink) But for now, watch this blog for even more details on the release of Free-Motion Framework.

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.

 




Introducing Free-Motion Framework by Jen Eskridge

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T PublishingFree-Motion Framework is finally here!!!

Free-Motion Framework is my newest book releasing with C & T Publishing. I’m beyond excited to share the concept and details with you over the coming weeks.

In a nutshell, the book is 10 linear designs created to help you improve your machine quilting skills while accidentally producing a wholecloth quilt. Sounds a bit crazy, right?

I started out wanting to create a wholecloth quilt but soon realized there’s no way I wanted to plan a wholecloth quilt. It became clear that if I simply had a few guidelines marked, I could quilt whatever I felt comfortable-enough stitching and, as long as I worked symmetrically, I’d probably turn out a really neat quilt.

The design is a bonus pattern in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package.

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.

C & T  Publishing’s blog has a more in-depth look at the book, with excerpts from the title in their new blog post.

To create this book, I worked with the aforementioned 10 linear designs, which I created in Adobe Illustrator. I then reached out to other machine quilters to assemble a team of 17 total quilters to create the 41 quilts featured in the book. Yes, FORTY-ONE quilts (not including any digital mock-ups).

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack Design by Jen Eskridge

Each design is presented in it’s full square composition, and a quadrant of the design is presented. Then each linear design is stitched four times, by four different quilters using as many or as few lines as they’d like to fill in shapes with machine quilting designs which they feel comfortable stitching. For this reason, this skill builder is great for ALL levels of machine quilters.

Take a look at these interpretations of the Shark Attack design:

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Jen Eskridge

 

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Joanna Marsh

 

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Jen Eskridge

 

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Geraldine Wilkins

This book will be a fantastic resource for machine quilting textures, as created by the army of quilting contributors, as well as a good go-to for low-stress machine quilting practice ideas. I hope you’ll add it to your library.

There will be more details on this book in the coming weeks. I will share more sneak-peeks at the designs, the concept, the writing process, and more. For now, though, know the book ships in May and is available for pre-order hereAsk for it at your local book store and quilt shop!

Free-Motion Framework on Instagram

Look for some of the designs on Instagram under the hashtag #FMFWQ

Images in this blog post are provided by C&T Publilshing.

 




Chevron Grande: A HUGE Flying Geese Tutorial

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Chevron Grande Quilt Tutorial

A HUGE Flying Geese Project

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Make this Chevron Grande Quilt using only nine pieces of fabric! My guess is you may already own nine pieces of fabric measuring 21″ x width of fabric. Using my HUGE Flying Geese measurements and construction methods, this large quilt, 72″ x 81″, stitches up so quickly. Grab your nine fabrics, and make it with me! Share yours using the hashtag #chevrongrande on Instagram.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Supplies:

  • 21″ of nine different fabrics (for Chevron triangles) When I choose my fabrics, I made sure each piece related to the two pieces next to it. They don’t all match each other, they only match their immediate neighbors. Even then, heck, who cares if they don’t match.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • 20″ binding fabric

Cutting:

  • Cut eight strips 2-1/2″ (OR 2-1/4″) wide from binding fabric. Use your preferred width. I cut 2-1/4″ binding strips.

From each of the nine pieces of fabric,

  • Cut one 19-1/4″ square
  • Cut four 10″ squares

Tip: When I cut my fabrics, I carefully laid out four fabric pieces in a stack and cut all four different color fabrics at once. Using a big cutting mat helped tremendously. I then stacked the remaining five pieces to cut those all at once, too. Super fast stuff.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Organize Your Cut Fabrics

The trickiest part of this pattern is arranging the fabrics. Keep these two details in mind:

  • Each of the large 19-1/4″ squares will become the four large triangles of a row. They form the “goose” area of the block.
  • The four 10″ matching the larger triangles must be stitched and added to the next row. They will form the “sky” area of the block.

Download this diagram to keep by your sewing station and mark which fabrics will be placed in which rows. It is a huge time saver for quilty-organization.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Using the diagram above, I grouped my fabrics and laid them out in small piles of five pieces, in the order they will be in rows on my quilt. (Note: The real life fabrics are different than the digital mock-up shown above.)

  • Fabric 1 small squares stitches to Fabric 2 LARGE square
  • Fabric 2 small Square stitches to Fabric 3 LARGE square
  • Fabric 3 small Square stitches to Fabric 4 LARGE square
  • Fabric 4 small Square stitches to Fabric 5 LARGE square
  • Fabric 5 small Square stitches to Fabric 6 LARGE square
  • Fabric 6 small Square stitches to Fabric 7 LARGE square
  • Fabric 7 small Square stitches to Fabric 8 LARGE square
  • Fabric 8 small Square stitches to Fabric 9 LARGE square
  • Fabric 9 small Square stitches to Fabric 1 LARGE square

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily DesignsChevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

No-Waste Flying Geese Method of Construction

This method of piecing the traditional flying geese block can be found all over the internet. I simply super-sized it. Wait until you see how big our geese are. They will be 18-1/2″ x 9-1/2″ before they are stitched into the finished quilt design.

To keep the rows in order, I stitch using one, five-piece pile at a time.

  • Mark a diagonal line on the wrong side of all four 10″ squares.
  • Lay two squares on the 19-1/4″ larger square, matching right sides, to create a large diagonal line.
  • Pin pieces together, perpendicular to the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Sew 1/4″ from the marked line on the right and left sides.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open the smaller triangles and press the seam allowances towards the smaller triangles. If you’ve created two slightly-weird heart shapes, you are on the right track.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Lay the remaining 10″ squares on each of the larger triangle pieces; making sure the diagonal line points “deep in the heart.” Easy to remember, right?
  • Sew 1/4″ from the right and left of the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.
  • Each pile of five fabric pieces will yield four large flying geese blocks.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • You may opt to sew the four geese together into a row now, so they do not get mixed up later. OR: roll the dice, live on the edge, run with the bulls and leave them in a tidy stack to stitch later. You, my friend, are WILD & DANGEROUS!
  • Repeat these steps with the remaining eight piles of fabric to create all 36 flying geese units.

Construct The Quilt

  • If you have not already, stitch each of the-same-color-type flying geese to itself to form nine rows.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Join the rows to create the quilt top. Make sure to pin at each intersection as the contrast in fabric colors will be noticeable if there’s a large shift in the seam at that point.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Finishing

The quilt top is complete. Of course, if you’d like to make it larger, you may opt to frame the design by adding borders.

Next, create a quilt sandwich with backing, batting and the top and quilt as desired. Or, if you like, send the top to a longarm quilter. I’d be happy to finish your project. Read more about my longarm quilting services at ReannaLilyQuilts.com.

Finally, bind using the eight strips cut at the beginning of the project. Use your favorite binding method.




Nested 9-Patch Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

 

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Custom Quilted Nested 9-Patch Pattern

In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Nested 9-Patch Quilts for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt three new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals collection for Penny Rose Fabrics, a division of Riley Blake Designs.

Farmhouse Florals by Nancy Zieman

The first quilt, Shiplap Ahoy was the focus in January, and Spinning 4-Patch last month. Today, the third pattern, Nested 9-Patch is showcased.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy ZiemanThe quilt is constructed using simple strip-pieced sewing techniques which are on the NZP blog today.

All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com.

Planning to Quilt

Each block has exactly the same seam lines. The color palette is soft so picking a quilting thread color wasn’t too tricky. I opted for Bone color glide 40wt thread. Before I started quilting, though, I really needed a design!

The beautiful 9-patch blocks are set on point, which means to quilt within each block will be wider than my longarm’s throat space. That means I will need to come up with a design where I can stitch the top half of the block, advance the quilt, then stitch the lower half of each block.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

I decided to approach this quilt with Lisa Calle’s Divide and Design method. My basic take-away from her book is to find points to connect within the block. Not necessarily seams or intersections, but rather points like “half way through this side” or “one inch passed the middle of this seam.”

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

First,I stitched and echoed arches from corner to corner having the apex fall about 1″ past the middle of the inner seam. I added hooked feathers under the arch shape.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Next, I stitched another diamond shape in the center of the 9-patch. I added wishbone stitches in each new corner created.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Here’s a top view. You can really see the arch and diamond shape pop a bit more in this picture.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

And as always, if you use a solid color quilt backing, you will REALLY see the quilting lines.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy ZiemanThe back of each of the quilts is a 108″ wide mottled white by Riley Blake Fabrics.

Fabric and Pattern Give Away

Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC is giving away a fat quarter bundle and pattern on their blog. Hop over to see how to enter to win!

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

*Some images used belong to NZP, LLC. 
*This post contains a few affiliate links.