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Ticker Tape Owl Quilt

Ticker Tape Owl Quilt

on Jan 7, 2016 in Blog, quilt, sewing, tutorial | 6 comments

Ticker Tape Owl Quilt If you have fabric scraps laying around, chances are you are all set to make this Ticker Tape style Owl project. What do I mean by ticker tape? Heck, I’m not sure. I think it stems from those “Ticker Tape Parades” where all the small pieces of confetti paper fly through the air. Let’s say that’s what it is… and those little pieces landed on a quilt and are arranged by color and machine stitched in place. Sure. Yes. This is sounding good. Are you with me? Ticker Tape Quilts are?perfect projects for folks who save all sizes of fabric scraps. You know who you are… you’ll save those tiny tiny tiny pieces. This is your our project! Scroll to the bottom to see how insanely fast you can create half-square triangles used in the border of this project by simply using a Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide. Finished size: 18″ x 18″ – project sizes can vary depending on how you use your sweet owlie block. Supplies Elmer’s School Glue Sulky Monofilament Thread Water Soluble Marker Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide Fusible Woven Interfacing 1/2 yard linen (I used a recycled garment from the thrift store.) Assorted fabric scraps Owl Template PDF? Prep I used a shirt back from a thrift store garment. After measuring, a?14-1/2″ square will be as big as I can?cut. Apply the fusible woven interfacing to the wrong side of the linen. If you are using the 1/2 yard linen for your background, you?can cut to any size you prefer. For my project, the background fabric is 14-1/2″ x 14-1/2″ and is cut after the interfacing is applied. Mark the center of the linen square. Print the 3-page owl template. Overlap the images and tape the pages together to create one chubby little owl. Fold the large page to find the center of the owl. Use a window pane as a light box by taping the owl to the glass. Tape the linen background over the template, matching the marked centers. Use the water soluble marker?to trace the image onto the right side of the linen background square. Fabric Scraps I lucked into a bag of Cotton and Steel Fabrics selvage scraps...

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Patriotic Wonky Star Quilt Tutorial

Patriotic Wonky Star Quilt Tutorial

on Dec 8, 2015 in Blog, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting, Seamingly Accurate, tutorial | 0 comments

Patriotic Wonky Star Quilt Tutorial Welcome to my Patriotic Wonky Star Quilt tutorial! I recently created this quilt at the request of my best friend. It may or may not be used in an upcoming fundraiser. If it is, I’ll be sure to let you know. It whipped up rather quickly and I thought you might like to see how I did it. The key to fast sewing is the assembly line methods. And there’s even a couple bloopers. Who doesn’t love bloopers? (Ok, I didn’t love them when they were happening, but they are a bit funny now.) There are plenty of ways to create a wonky star, as google will show you, but this is the way I approached it. Supplies 10 Red Fat Quarters 10 Blue Fat Quarters 12 White Fat Quarters 2/3 yard star print binding Finished Size – 70″ x 84″ Cut For this quilt, cut 5″ squares from each fat quarter. A single fat quarter will yield 12 squares 5″ x 5″ This tutorial will work with charm squares. I opted not to use them since the red, white and blue nature of the quilt was my main focus. You’ll need to cut a total of: 120 Red Squares 5″ x 5″ 120 Blue Squares 5″ x 5″ 150 White Squares 5″ x 5″ Make I’m aiming for these blocks pictured above.30 total blocks that will finish up around 14″. Half the blocks are red and half are blue with tidy white stars in the middle. The fabric measurements and cutting requirements will create a quilt 5 blocks x 6 blocks in this color scheme. Use a 1/4″ seam allowance when stitching this project. Start by sorting out 30 white squares. These will be your block middles and you won’t want to cut them. Next, cut the remaining white squares in half at random angles. I placed the white piece over the corner of a red or blue square, making sure this is what it would look like once I stitched it in place. Tilting the white piece and slanting it in various directions will give the wonk to your wonky star block. Then, just “eye balling it” I flipped that white rectangle...

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Strip Pieced Diagonal Beginner Quilt

Strip Pieced Diagonal Beginner Quilt

on Jul 21, 2015 in Blog, charity, quilt, tutorial | 3 comments

Welcome to the Strip-Pieced Diagonal Quilt Tutorial! If you follow the blog, you’ll know my 13 year old son has recently approached me about “summer volunteer hours.” We decided to work on quilts for charity. Needing a simple quilt pattern, this quilt was born. The tutorial was tested by this kiddo who has never stitched before. The design is created by sewing sets of strips, then chopping up the sets. It is quick and super easy. Finished Size: 36″ x 48″ The quilt is created from one block: The quilt finishes at 36″ x 48″, a baby size quilt. If you want to make this bigger, 72″ x 96″ (large enough for a bed) simply make this tutorial size 4 times and stitch the quadrants together. Fabric Requirements: 2/3 yard medium color fabric 2/3 yard medium color fabric 5/8 yard dark fabric (diagonal squares and binding) Construction: Use a rotary cutter, cutting mat, and ruler?to cut the following strips: From EACH medium fabric: One strip 3-1/2″ x width of fabric One strip 6-1/2″ x width of fabric One strip 9-1/2″ x width of fabric From the dark fabric: Four strips 3-1/2″ x width of fabric Four strips 2-1/2″ x width of fabric (binding) Join the following rows using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Use the Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide to ensure the 1/4″ is accurate before the fabric hits the presser foot. The seam guide is great for “training” beginning sewist’s eyes. Make a total of FOUR strip sets for one baby quilt. Press seam allowances towards the dark fabric. With each strip set, first “even up” the ends trimming a small amount of fabric. Once the end is square, cut 12 columns from each set, 3-1/2″ wide. To really make this quilt FAST, we layered all four sets, staggering them 1″ so the seams wouldn’t lay on each other, and rotary cut all twelve columns at once. Arrange the 3-1/2″ cut columns so one column from each strip set is represented in the block, as described below: Join the four columns using a 1/4″ seam allowance and the Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide. Arrange the 12 identical blocks into a 3 x 4 grid. We created a diagonal grid with...

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Ohio Star Barn Quilt

Ohio Star Barn Quilt

on Jun 30, 2015 in Blog, tutorial | 2 comments

It is warm enough to finally put together a small barn quilt project. I have been wanting to make a barn quilt for about 5 years now. Unfortunately, I have no barn. In fact, I live in HOA-suburban-America-land. (Ok, but it would be awesome if I could just hang a barn quilt over my garage!) Thankfully, my parents live in a rural area where a barn quilt would look awesome. My quilty-mom doesn’t seem to object to the idea of getting a barn quilt as a gift. How To Make a Barn Quilt Unlike traditional barn quilts, designed to be seen from the highway on fabulous barn quilt trail drives, this project will be 4′ x 4′ and hang in a large backyard. Please keep in mind: This is not the exact science of all things woodworking and painting. This is how I made my little barn quilt. First up, I priced the plywood. Turns out it is much more cost effective to buy a large sheet of plyboard and have the folks at the home improvement store cut it in half. Hooray – I have a spare piece for when I mess up the first piece! Side note– If you really do screw up the first try, you can always flip the wood over to the back before you have to bust out the second piece. Supplies: This is a “here’s what I bought” list. Interior/Exterior Spray Paint Painter’s Tape Paint Brush Kilz 2 Primer Ruler (not pictured) Pencil (not pictured) Poster board (not pictured) I might still go back and buy a sealer used for exteriors, even though the paint and primer is rated for outdoor use. I just didn’t grab it on the first day. The hardest part of this project was determining which block to use. For the first, traditional barn quilt, I decided to go with the uber-traditional Ohio Star quilt block in patriotic colors. Maroon, Navy, and Cream. I thought the darker colors would wear better over time. – I’ll let you know in a few years if that holds true. – Step 1– Prime the whole 4′ x 4′ square with Kilz2. Make sure to add the primer to the edges to give them...

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Mini Plus Quilt Pattern

Mini Plus Quilt Pattern

on Mar 10, 2015 in Blog, tutorial | 1 comment

I have a Plus Quilt Pattern Worksheet – FOR A MINI QUILT – just for you! It seems the Plus Quilt Baby Size quilt pattern is a popular free download. It occurred to me I could go smaller and use a portion of a 5″ square charm pack to create a cute mini quilt.   Get the Mini Plus Quilt Pattern worksheet HERE. Since this is a mini quilt, finishing approx 15″ x 18″, it is less critical to use the worksheet to plan your design. You probably have table space or a TV tray big enough to lay out the plus design, using the worksheet as a guide. Like the larger Plus Baby Quilt, the design is stitched in 7 rows, then the rows are joined.Stitch using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Grab a Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide to make sure your 1/4″ seam is always accurate. The pattern includes two borders. Those are optional, of course. I went with black and a pale blue for this first Plus Mini Quilt. Unfortunately, the blue is super washed out in the picture below.   The Plus Mini Quilt is small enough that one single fat quarter (18″ x 22″) is used as the backing for the quilt. This is a fun fast pattern for those mini quilt swaps you’ve been wanting to join. =) If you are curious about the lovely charm pack (precut 5″ squares) I used, I’ll tell ya – it is Hello Gorgeous by Melissa Ybarra for Iza Pearl Designs for Windham Fabrics.  ...

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Insulated Grocery Tote Sewing Tutorial

Insulated Grocery Tote Sewing Tutorial

on Mar 3, 2015 in Blog, sewing, tutorial | 23 comments

  Insulated Grocery Tote Sewing Tutorial Sometimes I need an insulated bag. Not a full-on cooler with hard sides and wheels, but just an insulated bag. I decided to whip one up and share my how-to with you on the blog today. The bag is pretty big and measures 19″ x 16″ x 7″. Supplies 1?yard decorator weight fabric, 54″ wide (fabric used in sample is from Ikea) 1 reflective car shade 1-1/2 yard cording, 1″ wide 2 pieces grosgrain ribbon 3/8″ wide x 10″ long 22″ long plastic, non-separating zipper 2 large safety pins Turning Tool Construction Prepare the Insulated Grocery Tote Bag Body Cut the fabric to 42″ x 20″ The car shade has two sides: a reflective side and a plain side. Place the reflective side down on your work surface and lay the home dec fabric rectangle on top. Pin Carefully cut out the car shade, using the home dec fabric as your pattern. Baste around the entire perimeter, 1/4″ from the cut edge, so that the two layers will act as one while we stitch the bag. This is called underlining the fabric. Make the Fabric-Covered Handles Cut two pieces of decorator fabric 3″ x 32″ Fold the long rectangles in half, lengthwise, to create a casing/strap. Stitch using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Grab a Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide to make sure your 1/4″ seam is always accurate. Use a turning tool to turn each casing/strap right-side out. Cut the 1″ wide cording to 26″ long. !! Make sure to wrap tape generously around the area to cut. This will ensure the cording doesn’t fray apart. !! Place a large safety pin at each end of the cording, through the tape.   Use the safety pins to carefully push the end of the cording through the casing. Once the cording is completely inside, trim the casing evenly 2″ longer than the cording on each side. The pins in the picture show you where the cording stops. It was tricky to get a good photo of that one. Build the Insulated Grocery Tote NOTE: If you wanted to add a drop-pocket or patch-pocket to the front of the bag, add it now. This tutorial doesn’t...

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Seamingly Accurate Pajama Pants Waistband

Seamingly Accurate Pajama Pants Waistband

on Sep 25, 2014 in Blog, sewing, tutorial | 0 comments

Ever need to make the elastic waist band on a pair of pajama pants or shorts? Need the top of a drawstring bag? Check out this accurate way to make the hemmed fabric casing (for the elastic) using the Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide: ps- Sorry the video gets funky at the very end, but it is still a neat...

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Mini Dresden – Facings

Mini Dresden – Facings

on Aug 26, 2014 in Blog, Learn To Sew Easy Curves, quilt, tutorial | 2 comments

  I’m working on my Mini Dresden quilt and I wanted to share with you how I got to the image above. I will be appliqueing my Dresden circle shapes onto a solid white background. I needed to prep them for machine-stitched applique. Using the techniques in Learn to Sew Easy Curves, I’ll show you how I did it. Learn to Sew Easy Curves – Technique First, pick a facing fabric. This is not interfacing, though it could be. I used old fabric from my scrap bin. Place the pressed Dresden on the facing, matching right sides. Pin around the outside circumference and pin along the inner donut hole. Use a 1/4″ seam allowance to stitch around the shape. Sew around the outside AND sew the donut hole.   Technically, your shape is a “sealed” tube at this point. That is ok. The next step is to cut away the excess facing fabric. Trim the edges even with the cut edges of the Dresden. ((Sorry for the blur in that one!)) Now we need to bust into the sealed tube by cutting the facing a equidistant from each stitching line. Be careful to ONLY cut the facing. Check out the picture: As with sewing any faced curve, clip around the curves. Make each clip perpendicular to the stitching line in the seam allowance. Cut TO but not THRU the stitching line. If you find that, once your shape is right side out, it is still lumpy, you may need either (1) more frequent clips or (2) to cut closer up to that stitching line. NOTE: The tighter the curve the more clips you will require. The more gentle the curve, the more you can have space between your clips. Now we’ve got to turn these babies right side out. The facings will be flipped to the wrong side of the Dresden and pressed. But there’s a trick: Whenever I’m “flipping to the wrong side” I always press the flip piece “up” first. I do this with facings and whole quilt bindings. Press it up like in the photo above, so that when you do actually go to flip the piece, the facing already wants to go that direction. It...

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The Serger Strip Quilt

The Serger Strip Quilt

on Jul 29, 2014 in Blog, quilt, tutorial | 4 comments

The Serger Strip Quilt After I folded my fabric in the Great Fabric Re-Fold of 2014, I decided I really needed to make up a few quick quilts. I found a tutorial for?really fast?half-square triangles (which are really quarter square triangles – anywho). I decided to take the same idea and make big ole quilt blocks with it using my serger. My serger is sooooooo much faster than my sewing machine and is perfect for straight stitching. Scrappy Strip Quilt Tutorial Here’s a little tutorial for how it went: **You can make this whole thing using a 1/4″ seam allowance and a straight stitch. I used a serger because it was much faster. First, I cut strips and serged them together in pairs. I cut a total of 48 strips from 7 different fabrics. Could you use a 40 piece pre cut jelly roll and 2/3 yard of additional fabric but into the remaining 8 strips? Totally.       I serged 6 strips, at random, together to get a row that was 12 1/2″ tall x width of fabric. Here’s what it looks like from the back, on the ironing board.       And the front of the strips. Oh man, these look great in the sun. I have orange, blue, khaki, floral-y brown, blue and orange, again.     Next I cut the strips into squares. These ended up to be 12 1/2″ squares. If you are using this tutorial to make your own – at this step, measure the width of your strip set and cut the squares to be THAT size. If you have a wider 1/4″ seam allowance, your strip set may finish up 11 3/4″ tall. That is totally fine. Just make sure to cut your squares 11 3/4″. Lay two blocks on top of each other. Make sure you rotate the top square 90 degrees, so the stripes do not line up. This will be important. The next step (and here is the magic!) is to sew -or serger- around the entire perimeter of the square. Love. Love. Love. Serge. Serge. Serge.   Vocabulary NOTE: Half-square triangles seem to be generally regarded as a triangle block made from half of a...

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Quilted Plus Quilts

Quilted Plus Quilts

on Jun 10, 2014 in Blog, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting, tutorial | 0 comments

  Finished up two more of those super easy & fast?Plus Quilts. The baby quilt design is a free pattern here on the website and uses 12 fat quarters (including binding). I was able to race through these on the quilt frame. I actually took time to consider making a quilt design that wouldn’t have me “re-aligning” and “rolling the bars” every few minutes. Hooray for basic clam shells. And quilting designs with an easy edge-to-edge pass.     I doubt this is the right way to trim binding, but I generally trim it off while I’m sitting on the couch. If the quilt is really big, though, I’ll crawl around the floor to trim off the excess batting and backing fabrics. I don’t know if that is the right way either. Generally, I put the binding on by machine. Once it is stitched to the back, if you press the binding outwards, it helps tremendously when you need to fold it around to the front and machine stitch it in place. Oh hey, look, those aren’t basic clam shells. But they sorta are. Let me show you what it looks like:   I’m calling them Clam Shellys. Wait, it will make sense in a second. …. When I got to the top of the clam shell arc, I made a cursive letter “e” and then went back down. Of course, in the real thread and fabric, each row of clam shell “e”s touch, but I thought it might be more clear to see if I had them slightly apart in the image. Still a very fast free motion quilting (FMQ) design, though. Give it a try! Can you see them better in the pictures below? You can click those images to enlarge them.   And here are the whole quilts. Both quilts draped over my side fence. Also, I feel I should tell you, I’m the kind of friendly neighbor that will photoshop your roof out of my pictures. Ha.  ...

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