Giant Fat Quarter Flying Geese – Queen Size

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The Fat Quarter Flying Geese free quilt pattern/tutorial makes a queen size quilt using fat quarters. These traditional Flying Geese block units are HUGE! Get your fat quarter pieces out and pull 28 coordinating pieces. No more hoarding fat quarters with this easy, big ole’ design.

Fabrics Used in this Quilt

  • 24-piece fat quarter bundle (Garnet, by Nancy Zieman)
  • Plus 4 additional coordinating fat quarters
  • 1 yard of brown for the 4″ border
  • Additional fabric for the binding

Using the free pattern, I stitched 55 HUGE geese each measuring 16-1/2″ x 8-1/2″.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Note: If you happen to have a layer cake (10″ precut square pieces) rather than a fat quarter bundle, use this Giant Flying Geese with Layer Cakes pattern instead.

Sew the Quilt

The quilt is arranged in five columns, each with 11 rectangular blocks. The easiest way to create the top:

 

  • Start with 56 geese.
  • Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all.
  • Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column.
  • Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs.
  • Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column.
  • Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column.
  • Add a border if you like.

Yes, it is pretty random. I like that look.  But, by sewing the geese in pairs first, you do have the option of making a traditional style quilt where the geese (large triangle) points all “fly” in one direction.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

The quilt is framed in a 4″ brown border. I think it helps with the randomness.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

The design is quilted focusing the geese (larger) and sky (smaller) triangles separately.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Without the borders, the quilt measures approximately 80″ x 88″. Turns out, that is really big for snapping a photo in the back yard.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collectionHere it is on the fence…. oops- with wind. I’m sure there’s an actual “flying geese” joke here somewhere….

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Ah, wait. Here we go. I love how this turned out and wouldn’t ya know, I have more fat quarters to create another quilt.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs




Patriotic Disappearing 9-Patch with 10″ Precut Squares

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Quilt Pattern

It feels like a Disappearing 9-Patch -a-palooza over  here lately. Using the free pattern to feature 10″ square precuts (layer cakes), I whipped up this queen size quilt (75″ x 90″) in a weekend. It really is that easy.

The pattern calls for:

  • 1 Layer Cake (40 pieces of precut 10″ squares)
  • 2-1/3 yard white/background fabric

Ok. I have those supplies. Er, but wait. No. I didn’t have them.

Instead I used a 10″ square ruler to basically cut my own 40 squares from assorted blue and red fabrics. Here’s how that math breaks out:

  • 1/3 yard of FIVE different reds
  • 1/3 yard of FIVE different blues

Cut the pieces down to 10″ x width of fabric. (If you are buying fabric for this project, I’d go with 1/3 yard, just to be sure you have a bit of wiggle room if the cuts aren’t square. And, if they are square- voila! You’ll have 3″ leftover to make matching binding for your quilt.)

From each 10″ wide piece, cut four 10″ x 10″ squares, which will yield 20 reds and 20 blues. Easy, right? We needed a total of 40 so that is right on pace.

Cut the background fabric as described in the original pattern and follow the original directions from here on out.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Quilt Pattern

I’m so glad to have cut into some of my fabric stash to create this quilt. I will definitely be doing this again. In fact, any scraps that happen to meet the 10″ x 10″ requirement might go into their own special “Future Disappearing 9-patch Ziploc.” That is the official organizational method I use: Ziploc. Fancy, right?

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Quilt Pattern

Using my HandiQuilter Avante 18, I stitched meandered stars all over the design. When its washed, it will have some great shrinkle! Do you know shrinkle? When the quilt shrinks a tiny bit in the was and comes out all crinkley = shrinkle.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Quilt Pattern

I hope you give the Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern a try. It is every bit as easy as the popular Disappearing 9-patch patterns all over Pinterest. The only difference is you sew a bit less and are done a bit faster. It is excellent for a quick gift!

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Quilt Pattern

If you are looking for fun precut 10″ squares, check out Craftsy. They have loads of options from which to choose. Craftsy is even offering this pattern in a quilt kit, which features Lily and Loom precut squares and coordinating background fabric yardage.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

This blog contains affiliate links.






Folding Chair Makeover – DIY

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

These folding chairs may have been some of my first furniture in my college apartment. That was, shall we say, a few years ago. They are looking pretty rough! After checking them out to see if I could easily remove the padded section, the “makeover” wheels started turning.

This is how I upgraded my crummy, handy, trustworthy folding chairs with spray paint and recovered the chairs with about a 1/2 yard of fabric.

Supplies

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Screwdriver
  • Sharp Scissors (fabric scissors, if you have them)
  • Hot Glue
  • About 1/2 yard of fabric
  • Spray Paint
  • Old Crummy Folding Chairs (or new ones, if you fancy)

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

I picked my fabric to match my wild paint color. It is Maui Blue.

My chair only has a padded seat. The back of the chair is solid metal.

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

Step 1

Take out the six screws that are holding the pad onto the metal chair.

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

Step 2

Remove the plastic feet. Turns out, I couldn’t get the little feet off, so I ended up masking them off with painter’s tape.

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

Step 3

Shake the spray paint and follow the directions to apply paint to the chair. If your paint requires spray primer first, prime it. If the chair needs to be sanded first, sand it.

Paint the chair from one direction. Remember- you won’t have to paint the seat of the chair. It will be covered with the fabric pad. (Hey, don’t spray too much! You don’t want to have paint drips like in the below picture. I ended up wiping those with a paper towel and fixing it on the second coat.)

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

Once the paint is dry, flip the chair upside down and paint it from another angle. This will help you cover all the areas.

Step 4

This is the step where we cover the pad while waiting for the paint to dry outside.

So you’ll notice when the pad is removed, the cheap vinyl is held on by staples. I’m thinking “Awesome, I have a staple gun.” Then I started thinking more….

My staples are quite long and don’t really look like these staples. If I staple this fabric to my chair pad, I bet I get poked in the legs or bum with those dang staples.

Hum.

Enter Hot Glue!

  • Lay the fabric on the ground, wrong side up.
  • Center the pad
  • Wrap the center area of opposing sides first.
  • Work your way along each side.
  • Smooth the corners
  • Make sure you can see the original screw holes; cutting away fabric where needed.

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

I figure the screws will also help hold the fabric securely to the chair as it will be pinched between the pad and metal seats.

Step 5

Bring the chair in to remove the painters tape OR put the plastic feet back on the chair legs.Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

Step 6

Screw the pad to the seat of the chairs using the original holes and screws.Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

Finito!

The crummy grey/tan college folding chair can have new life as a trendy little blue chair.

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

And he can hang out with his new coordinated chair-friend, too.

Recover and Paint a Folding Chair | DIY | Tutorial | How-To by ReannaLily Designs

I hope you liked this no-sew, super-easy afternoon Folding Chair Makeover!

Fabrics in this tutorial are Timeless Treasures and Laura Gunn for Michael Miller.

 

 

This post contains an affiliate link.



Project Quilting – Eight is Great Challenge

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Project Quilting has kicked off its eighth season! This is my first year to play along with the weekly challenges.

The first challenge was to make something with the number 8. Then, it is wide open after that.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

I knew I wanted to make 8 Flying Geese blocks, and I knew I wanted them 3-D. The rest is made up along the way. I did take pictures and make notes, though. Here’s how I made my Flying Geese Mini Quilt.

  • Cut 16 squares 1-1/2″ x 1-1/2″ for the background
  • Cut 8 rectangles 1-1/2 x 2-1/2″ for the geese

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Each geese block uses two background squares and one rectangle. Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Fold the rectangle in half, matching wrong sides. Lay it on a the background square with the folded edge 1/4″ from the top. (see below)

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Can you see the fold along the top edge?

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Next, lay the remaining background square on top, matching right sides. Pin.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Sew along the pinned edge from the top to the bottom, using a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Open the background square. Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying GeesePress. Press it just like it is pictured above, with the white geese fabric still folded on the left.

See the “folded flap” of white?

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Use the pressed fold line to align the new triangle shape with the center seam.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

You can pin the right and left edges of the triangle, super press/starch them, baste along the lower edge, or simply press them & set them aside. (Y’all know I went with the last option!)

Chain piece the remaining 7 geese.

This cool chain piece cutter was an exchange gift this past Christmas. Holy smokes, I love this thing. Forget the scissors! I was using the thread cutter on my sewing machine to snip through the chains. Not anymore.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Once the pieces are cut apart, press each one, and create the triangle shapes.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

This is going to sound crazy, but I thought the regular 2 x 4 layout looked to plain. I wanted to mix it up with two odd numbers, 5 and 3.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Next, using the background fabric, I added a blank end piece so my two rows would be equal sizes.

  • The end piece is cut 2-1/2″ x 3-1/2″. Then I added a center strip cut 1-1/2″ x length.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Hum, that seems good. I added a whole background border around the geese.

  • Cut the background fabric borders: 1-1/2″ x length needed.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

It is coming together. It is a narrow little white border cut from the same geese fabrics.

  • The next border is cut 1″ wide x length needed.
  • I finished with a grey border, cut 3″ x length needed.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

In the Project Quilting directions, each quilt needs to be finished in one week’s time. (Code- I’m going to make a few small things first.) I wanted to try out my new metallic Sulky thread. I haven’t used metallic thread since college. This stuff has come a LONG way. It didn’t break at all. It was pretty great.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Awesome! And it is sooooo shimmery.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

I finished the quilting with a tiny bit of free motion squiggle lines in the blue background.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

Baste around the outside edge and trim.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

All that is left now is to add the narrow binding. I cut my binding for this project at 2-1/8″. I wanted it to be thin, but I was also working with fabric scraps from a previous project.

There you have it. I used metallic thread and my new cutter and fabric scraps and made 3-D geese and I finished in an evening and I rocked this run-on sentence! Wahooo!!

The finished piece is about 14″ square.

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

I’m excited to see what the next challenge will be!

Project Quilting | Eight is Great | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Flying Geese

 

This blog post contains affiliate links.



Mini Quilt Zip Top Bag

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-16Mini Quilt Transformed into Zip Top Bag

Are you addicted to internet mini quilt swaps? Are you running out of wall space? I have a cure for you.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-1

This above mini was part of a Heartbeat Table Runner pattern by Nancy Zieman.

Turn your mini quilt into a zippered bag with a couple easy steps. The best part: It doesn’t matter what size your mini quilt is!

Supplies

You’ll need a zipper roughly the same length or slightly longer than the short side of your mini quilt. Plastic, non-separating zippers work best.

If your zipper is shorter than your mini’s edge, you may want to sew zipper tabs to each end. Basically, you will be covering the zipper ends with fabric. Craftsy has a tutorial for zipper tab ends.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-2

Construction

My zipper is almost the exact size as my table runner. (It is the “wrong” kind of zipper. This one, from my stash, is a separating zip like you’d use in a jacket. I stitched a zigzag tack stitch over the teeth to keep the zipper from fully coming apart.)

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-3

Pin the right side of the zipper to the wrong side of the quilt at the binding. The zipper tape should extend past the binding a small amount.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-4

I pin parallel to the zipper tape to keep things straight.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-5

Start stitching right inside the side binding. Working from the wrong side, edge-stitch along the zipper tape. The stitching line should fall right on the edge of the binding, when looking at it from the front. The binding itself will create a sort of lip around the zipper. (below)

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-6

Unzip the zipper and apply to the opposite side. Pretend you are making a tube at this point, if that helps. Make sure the zipper’s right side is touching the quilt’s wrong side. See the “twist” on the lower right of the photo below?

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-7

The zipper is in place, and the mini quilt looks like a tube. I’m going to leave my zipper ends exposed and not covered with fabric tabs.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-8

At this point you have a few bag options:

Flat Pouch

If you like this flat pouch style, you can simply stitch the right and left sides of the bag. Do this by lining up the right and left bindings, and sew along the binding’s stitching line or in-the-ditch. If I opted for this method, I would simply cut off the excess zipper tape as the final step.miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-9

Standing Bag

Option two is the standing bag.

  • To make a standing bag, first close the zipper.
  • Flatten the bag with the zipper as one folded edge and the bag bottom as the other folded edge.
  • Stitch along the right and left seams either on the binding or in-the-ditch next to the binding.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-10

  • Next, turn the bag inside out.
  • Match the side seam with the bottom fold. Open the two bound edges flat.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-11

  • Pin a triangle shape where the side seam and bottom folds meet.
  • Sew across the triangle. This will create the width of the bag’s bottom. The size of the triangle will vary related to the size of your mini. For my bag, my triangles were about 1-1/2″ from seam line to point.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-12

  • Cut the excess triangle fabric 1/4″ past the stitching line.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-13

  • Use a zigzag stitch or serger to finish this interior cut edge. Sew slowly; there’s a great deal of bulk at the side seam line.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-14

  • Repeat the triangle treatment for both lower corners of the bag.
  • Turn the bag right-side out.
  • This is how the lower corner should look:

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-15

  • And a peek inside:

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-17

Yep. My mini quilt turned zip top bag is ready to go!

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-16




HUGE Cross and Plus Quilt

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

I have seen the Cross?and Plus?Quilt everywhere thanks to the great tutorial on Amy’s Badskirt Blog.She credits the block design to Nancy Cabot. I loved the block, but would like to make it HUGE. Thanks to EQ7 and a bit of math, it totally worked out.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Each of these quilt blocks finishes at 15″ square. That is a BIG block. With only 30 blocks, the quilt measures 75″ x 90″. Since this quilt uses fat quarters, it will definitely still look scrappy, even though it is mega-giant.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily DesignsHere’s how I made it:

Supplies

30 Fat Quarters* (I used Red and Blue. Choose 15 Fat Quarters from one color family and 15 from the other.)
—OR 3-1/4 yards color 1 (red) and 3-1/4 yards color (blue)

3 yards?white fabric

*A fat quarter is a precut fabric piece measuring 18″ x 22″.

Cutting

For this quilt- one fat quarter will be one block’s worth of pieces. If you’d like a 4 block x 6 block quilt, use 24 fat quarters instead of 30.

From each colored fat quarter cut the following:

  • Four 6-1/2″ squares
  • Two 3-1/2″ squares
  • One rectangle 3-1/2″ x 9-1/2″
  • Two rectangles 2-1/4″ x width (for binding) NOTE: Only cut binding from nine fat quarters. The rest will be extra/scrap fabric.

Fat Quarter Cutting Diagram | X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Once the 6-1/2″ squares are cut, remove two triangle corners using this template and rotary cutting tools.
(Grab the template pdf here.)

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

You will need a grand total of:

  • 120 squares 6-1/2″ x 6-1/2″ (then cut to fit the template)
  • 30 rectangles 3-1/2″ x 9-1/2″
  • 60 squares 3-1/2″ x 3-1/2″
  • 9 pieces cut 2-1/4″ x width of fabric (for binding)

From the white yardage cut:

  • 120 squares measuring 3-1/2″ x 3-1/2″
  • 120 squares measuring 3-7/8″ x 3-7/8″ !!! Cut these squares in half on the diagonal to yield 240 triangles.

Block Units

Each block is made up of three basic units:

Two double square blocks which measure 3-1/2″ x 6-1/2″

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

One long center unit measuring 3-1/2″ x 15-1/2″

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Four 6-1/2″ x 6-1/2″ squares

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Assemble the Units

Use a 1/4″ seam allowance on all seams for this project.

I worked in a?sewing?assembly line style and jammed this big double/queen size quilt out in a weekend.

First, I sorted my cut pieces by unit. I started with the double square units.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Using my quarter inch presser foot and my Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide, I stitched all these pieces at once. Line the edge of the fabric up with the 1/4″ mark on the seam guide to keep perfect seam allowances. I kept feeding pairs?into the machine, one after another.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Clip the threads between each unit?and press towards the darker fabric.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The long rectangle unit is assembled in the same fashion.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide | Patriotic Quilt | ReannaLily Quilts | Edge To Edge quilting

Next, I stitched the 6-1/2″ square units. I did not do the popular stitch-and-flip method to sew these blocks. My reasoning: Since the block is so big, the stitch-and-flip method would?be a bit wasteful. I’m already saving all the removed colored triangles in a ziploc baggie.

Matching right sides, lay the triangle on the diagonal cut of the colored block. Notice the points of the white?triangle are longer than colored block. Let each point extend 1/4″ at the start and stop of that seam.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

the Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide?will help keep your triangles equidistant and straight. The “V” where the two fabrics are off-set will be inline with the needle line and the edge of the fabric will be at the 1/4″ mark. This is how you’ll know the triangle is positioned correctly.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

The off-set is also shown in this Better Binding tutorial on Youtube, if you want to see it in action.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Be careful not to stretch this seam as you stitch; it is a bias cut.

I pieced these in an assembly line, too. Phew. I was a quiltin’ maniac this weekend.

Press the seam allowances towards the white triangles.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Assemble the Block

This is the block I’m aiming for:

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

One color family would be the X and the other color family would be the + (plus) in each block. I made a test block first to see if my mega-assembly-method would work. 15 red X’s and 15 blue X’s.

Lay the units in their places on my work surface.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Join the double square units to the 6-1/2″ square units on the right and left sides. Press the seam allowances towards the double squares.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Next, join the right and left sides to that long center rectangle. Press seam allowances towards the long rectangle.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Yep. That worked. You know what that means??? Assembly time!

I seriously laid out the remaining block units in stacks, on the work surface just as I did for the first block.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

I stitched all of one seam type, pressed, and re-positioned it back onto the work surface. Boom. Next seam. It was really really fast. I was working in 29-seam increments. I made one block, right? So that means each stack pictured above has 29 pieces. Sew 29 seams, press that unit, reposition on the work surface, and sew the next 29 seams. Hum. If you wanted to go math-crazy, it is only 174 seams. =)

Assembling the Top

Since I knew my quilt would be 5 blocks by 6 blocks, alternating blue and red, I didn’t even lay out my design. I took the math approach here, too.

First– Remove three red X blocks and three blue X blocks. Set these aside as they will make up the fifth column at the end.

Second– Grab a red X and blue X, match right sides and sew these two together. Make sure to keep the long center rectangles oriented vertically (Unless that isn’t important- it totally doesn’t have to be important.) Sew 12 pairs. Easy!

Third – Sew the pairs of pairs together, making sure to sew one red to one blue. This will create the six rows.

Fourth– Add in those blocks set aside in the first step. Stitch those dudes to the end of each of the six rows.

Fifth- The homestretch!! All you do now is alternate the rows to join them together. By this, I mean, odd number rows start on red and even number rows start on blue. Join 1 & 2. Join 3 & 4. Join 5 & 6. Now you only have 2 seams to go!X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Press.

Quilt. This speedy quilt was finished with a meandered star design. Yes, it is hard to see.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide | Patriotic Quilt

Bind. I opted to not use the scrappy binding, but rather use a piece of mottled blue fabric for the entire binding.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Ta’dah! This baby is heading out to a fundraiser event.






Clamshell Pillow Tutorial on Sew Mama Sew Blog

Clamshell Throw Pillow Quilt Tutorial on Sew Mama Sew by Jen Eskridge | The Quilted Clamshell

The Quilted Clamshell pillow is easy to make a is a “no pressure” way to practice quilting clamshell designs. This complete tutorial with step-by-step instructions is over on the Sew Mama Sew Blog. Stitch the designs by hand, on your home sewing machine, or on a longarm machine.

We’ll transform these simple supplies into a decorative home accent.

Clamshell Throw Pillow Quilt Tutorial on Sew Mama Sew by Jen Eskridge | The Quilted Clamshell

With design tips and styles from the quilting resource guide, The Quilted Clamshell, you cannot go wrong.

Clamshell Throw Pillow Quilt Tutorial on Sew Mama Sew by Jen Eskridge | The Quilted Clamshell

Make the arrangement as shown or make any clamshell design you prefer. It is a very customize-able project. The pillow in the tutorial only has 11 total clamshell shapes to let you dip your toe into the free motion quilting arena.

Clamshell Throw Pillow Quilt Tutorial on Sew Mama Sew by Jen Eskridge | The Quilted Clamshell

Grab your PDF download templates at Sew Mama Sew Blog. Post your projects to Instagram using the hashtag #thequiltedclamshell.

If you love the process and tutorial and want more design ideas for your next clamshell quilt, don’t forget to get your copy of The Quilted Clamshell.

The Quilted Clamshell by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Machine Quilting Book | Longarm | ReannaLily Quilts




Longarm Quilting Skill Builder – With Circles

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Whole Cloth Quilting Skill Builder
Now with CIRCLES

I recently created a little tutorial for a whole cloth quilting skill builder design. You can find that post here. It was a really fun project where you take a template, which?you can download, trace out all the lines onto your fabric, then quilt different fill designs within spaces. Sounds pretty straight-forward, right? Well, I decided to develop a second template. (I can see me going down a rabbit hole…. )

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here.

With both skill builder designs I wanted to have a small quilt to practice:

  • Filling in shapes with different designs
  • Consistency in the filling motifs
  • Ruler work
  • Speed & Confidence

The Template

The template is designed in Adobe Illustrator and fits on a 40″ square of fabric. The design itself is 38-1/2″ x 38-1/2″. The plan was to make a quilt that is big enough to practice on and small enough to not have a large financial commitment. Does that make sense? It is 1-1/8 yard of fabric. I used pieced batting scraps inside the design and pieced some scraps for the quilt back.

I also chose this size for my whole cloth because it would be easy enough to trace out four designs to create a much larger bed-size quilt.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

That is pretty neat, right? However, there’s no way I wanted to print a bunch of pages, tape them together and have a 38-1/2″ piece of paper. Designing just a quadrant solved the problem. Hooray! It prints on only 6 pages. Click here to download the quadrant pdf for yourself.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Using the whole cloth skill builder design:

Print the quadrant and choose to “tile pages” to print 6 pieces of paper on a pc or do this for a mac.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Fold your fabric in half lengthwise and width-wise to find the center and mark the exact vertical and horizontal guide lines. Press.

Tape or pin the printed design quadrant to a wall (or use window to act as a light board).

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Align the pressed vertical and horizontal lines with the edges of the quadrant. My fabric is light, so I can still see the lines though the weave.

Trace all the design lines onto the fabric using a?water soluble marker.I know the picture has a whole lotta blue coming at ya. Sorry about that. Blue fabric. Blue pen. Blue lines. Oh my!

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

To trace the entire design, remove the fabric. Turn it 90 degrees and trace the quadrant again. Repeat this step to finish out the design. Remember to align the folded centers with each rotation.

For this second skill builder sample, I only traced and stitched one quadrant. (And yeah, probably should have ironed my fabric first.)

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Deciding to Quilt

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

With the small quilt loaded onto my Handi Quilter Avante 18″, I decided to start in the upper left corner. If this was a whole radial design, I would have started in the center and worked my way out.

You can certainly use this template with any quilting style. Domestic machine quilting, hand quilting or longarm quilting.

Using rulers to guide me, stitched directly on a few of the blue marked lines first.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

I started by wanting to make some kind of wild feather in the upper left. As it turns out, I didn’t like the feather much and thought I could “save” it by quilting very densely around it, still within my marked lines. That is not my favorite.

I also tried my hand at straight lines converging on a point. Eh. Those are alright, I guess. It is a skill builder, after all.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

I used my?Creative Memories Circle Cutter, from 10 years ago, (instead of a ruler) to stitch out my circle shapes. The cutting system is the perfect height to use with my machine foot.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Once I had the circles in place, I decided my planned/stitched shapes needed some altering. No problemo-?seam ripper to the rescue.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

That is the beauty of the no-pressure, no-real-plan whole cloth skill builder. If you don’t like something, don’t stitch it. If you want bigger shapes, make ’em. Easy stuff. Dive in!

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. Those fills within the circle look a bit lumpy, but they were really fun to make.

Next, I wanted to try some curved cross-hatch quilting designs. I found a perfect spot for some of those. Each fill is just a few square inches. That is a really comfortable easy approach to making this whole cloth. For me, it certainly beats feeling overwhelmed with an intricate & planned design.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

The design is coming together.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. Now I needed to fill in (what would have been) the cool center section. I had stitched feathers and an arrow shape of?”C’s,” all based on marked lines.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Oooh- now to do something more with my circle rulers. I needed to practice them more so I decided to “echo” the arch a bit. I filled in with fat 1″ pebbles. Those… well, it is?a skill builder…

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

I moved back to the top and left sides to add in more “C’s” and more feathers.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. so here’s how the whole thing came together:

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

From way back here, it looks pretty cool. I totally wish I had traced all four quadrants.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Here it is side-by side with the template. It might give you an idea of which lines I opted to use and which lines I bailed on.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

And because I love Photoshop?& wished I had done the whole quilt design, I went ahead and roughly made myself a virtual quilt.Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.comWhole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. Now that I love. I’m going to have to make this one again. (I will not be doing that dense fill around that feather wedge though. That looks a bit crazy to me, but there’s no way I’m pulling out those stitches.)

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

One of the coolest parts about the skill builder quadrant is it will be different each time anyone makes it. Pick and choose whatever lines you want to follow. Fill with whatever designs you are working on at the time. Go as detailed or as loose as you feel comfortable. I just love it. It is a choose your own adventure book for longarm quilting.

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFW. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

If you give it a go, I’d love to see it!

And lastly, I noticed when I did the first skill builder, I was able to practice a design/fill at least four times (making all four quadrants) and by that last space my fill started looking good. You know, the way practice is supposed to work. I think by only doing one quadrant this time, I didn’t get the full practice in each design. Always learning, right?




Longarm Quilting Skill Builder

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Small Whole Cloth Quilting Skill Builder

I love to look at whole cloth quilts, but I’d need some serious skills to be able to make one! I decided I should make a skill builder design for myself to practice my longarm quilting. Specifically, I wanted to practice:

  • Filling in shapes with different designs
  • Consistency in the filling motifs
  • Ruler work
  • Speed & Confidence

First steps in Adobe Illustrator.

The design I’m sharing with you today will finish at?38″ square. I figured this way it would be a small enough piece to not agonize over, but larger enough to apply to quadrants of a quilt if I wanted to make a bed size quilt. (Well, it’d have to have borders to really be bed-size, but that is neither here nor there.) Ok- page set up 38″ square. In a nutshell- draw a line this way, pull a curve that way, rotate around a center mark…. Ta’dah! Well, it wasn’t THAT easy, I made a rough draft, tested it, tweaked it and then TA’DAH – the image below.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

That is pretty neat, right? Then I realized that there’s no way I wanted to print a bunch of pages, tape them together and have a 38″ piece of paper. Designing just a quadrant solved the problem. Hooray! It prints on only 6 pages. Click here to download the quadrant pdf for yourself.

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Let me show you how I used my whole cloth skill builder design:

((I was working from the rough draft illustrator design so the design lines vary slightly. ))

Print the quadrant and choose to “tile pages” to print 6 pieces of paper on a pc or do this for a mac.

First, I found a piece of fabric roughly 1-1/4″ x 42″ (width of fabric). Fold it in half lengthwise and width-wise to find the center and mark the exact vertical and horizontal guide lines. Press.

Tape or pin the printed design quadrant to a wall (or use window to act as a light board).

Align the pressed vertical and horizontal lines with the edges of the quadrant. My fabric is light yellow, so I can still see the lines though the weave.

Trace all the design lines onto the fabric using a?water soluble marker.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Remove the fabric. Turn it 90 degrees and trace the quadrant again. Repeat this step to finish out the design.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Deciding to Quilt

In hindsight, I probably should have added 2″ basting stitches across the entire quilt before beginning. Having skipped that step, I’ll say – What the heck, it turned out ok for a first try!!! =)

I started in the middle of the design by tracing four shapes that joined in the center. If you are planning on doing this on your own- it doesn’t matter which shapes you start with.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Using rulers to guide me, stitched directly on the blue marked lines first. I tested the ole skills by trying to stitch 1/4″ away from the original line. Then I decided I’d pick something fun and curvy to fill in my first four shapes.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Ok. That wasn’t so bad. By the 4th shape, the lines were really starting to fall where I wanted them…. as opposed to the first shape.

Next, I wanted to try to make super straight ruled lines as a fill. Ok, just gotta find a shape and outline it first.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Little chunks like this with no real big commitment or plan really helped me out. For example: The space I chose to add ruled lines, well, there were 8 symmetrical spaces for a total of probably 12 square inches. I can handle 12 square inches, right??

I continued on in this fashion: Which little line cluster can I outline and fill? Ok. Next. Ok, which little line cluster can I outline and fill?

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Here’s a fun fact: Yes, that IS a Creative Memories Circle Cutter from 10 years ago! I do all my family photobooks digitally, nowadays.?I happen to still have this perfect-size circle and oval cutting system. Turns out the plastic is the ideal height for round longarm rulers. You are welcome.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

You’ll notice that I didn’t stitch on every blue line. I was really trying to just isolate “shapes I wanted to fill” and that was the plan.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

If one of the skills you are trying to build is speed, do not choose pebbles. bwhahahaha. Stinkin’ pebbles.

Here’s a view from under the machine.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Oh man. There are some lumpy parts (noticeable only to me), but I don’t even care. I love this thing!

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

After three days of hopping on the longarm intermittently to fill a few shapes at a time, it was finally time to take off the water soluble ink.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

And here’s the craziest part that I didn’t anticipate- Since this was fill-this-on-a-whim type quilting, I had no idea what it would really look like when it was done. It was a total HGTV reveal moment for me! “Oh my gosh, I cannot believe this is the same fabric.” -kind of reveal. Unlike HGTV, I didn’t cry or cut to commercial break with a suspenseful sentence.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

One of the coolest parts about the skill builder quadrant is it will be different each time anyone makes it. Pick and choose whatever lines you want to follow. Fill with whatever designs you are working on at the time. Go as detailed or as loose as you feel comfortable. I just love it. It is a choose your own adventure book for longarm quilting.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

If you give it a go, I’d love to see it!

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFW. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing




Huge No-Waste Flying Geese with Fat Quarters

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese MethodMy huge no-waste flying geese quest continues! Oh my goodness. I made them recently from layer cakes (precut 10″ fabric squares). I then thought, “What if I don’t have a layer cake and I only have fat quarters?” Oh… this could work, too. So here we go!

The size shown in this quilting tutorial is a finished Baby Size quilt- 48″ x 40″ made with 8 fat quarters (precut 18″ x 22″ fabric pieces). Here are some size options:

Baby Size – 40″ x 48″

8 Assorted Fat Quarters

Quilt is arranged in a 3 x 5 grid with one extra flying geese block left over.

Queen Size – 80″ x 88″

28 Assorted Fat Quarters

Quilt is arranged in a 5 x 11 grid with one extra flying geese block left over.

———————————————————-

Divide your fat quarters in half. One half will be used as the large triangle (geese) and the other half will be used as the smaller corner triangles (sky).

From the large triangle (geese) pile, cut a single large square measuring 17-1/4″ x 17-1/4″. (For this step, I layered a few fat quarters and cut the squares all at once.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

From the smaller corner triangle (sky) pile, cut four squares -from each fat quarter!- measuring 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

———————————————————-

No-Waste Flying Geese Method

For each no-waste construction block, you’ll need:

  • 1 large square
  • 4 smaller squares

Each construction block will yield FOUR flying geese units. Baby Size = 16 geese units. Queen Size = 56 geese units.

Mark a diagonal line on the wrong side of each smaller square using a non-permanent fabric pen. (The red line is digitally added for better visibility. The pen really does mark blue and wash out easily.)

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Lay two smaller squares in opposite corners of the larger square. Make sure to match right sides and make the marked diagonal lines appear to connect across the entire large block. Pin.

Notice the cut edges meet at the outer corners.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Use a 1/4″ presser foot to stitch 1/4″ away from the marked line.

Flip the entire large square and stitch 1/4″ away from the marked line on the other side.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Cut the two halves apart with a rotary cutter.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method
Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

This will create a crazy heart-looking shape, which is how you’ll know you are on the right track.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Match right sides and pin one remaining square to the corner. The diagonal line should point from the V of the heart shape to the outer corner.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Stitch 1/4″ away from the marked diagonal line on the right and left sides.

Use a rotary cutter to cut along the marked diagonal line, just as you did before.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Each geese unit is 16-1/2″ x 8-1/2″.Pretty big, right??Ok, it isn’t as big as the Layer Cake Flying Geese blocks, but if you have fat quarters on hand, it is a great way to go.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Trim the blocks if necessary, but remember there needs to be 1/4″ seam allowance extending past the point.

Arrange Blocks

In the Layer Cake Flying Geese blocks, I stitched the geese units into pairs. Having a big square block made the mixed-up design easy to arrange. For this smaller baby quilt, I needed to sew the blocks one-at-a-time and set them in a traditional manner.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

One column pointing up, one pointing down, one pointing up. Once the color placement is decided, stitch blocks matching right sides and using a 1/4″ seam allowance. (Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide is shown below.)

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Stitch columns.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Join columns to form the quilt top.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

Longarm Quilting

Though this quilt is only 40″ x 48″ and could be managed easily under the domestic sewing machine, I decided to push myself to to work with longarm quilting rulers.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

I’m not totally committed to rulers quite yet. I decided to add an arc in across each large geese block and then surround it with free motion quilted feathers.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

In the sky or corner triangles, I made up a little free motion quilting shape there, too.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

All in all, it went along pretty quickly. I’m LOVING how the back turned out. You can really see the quilting in the flannel light blue.

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

This little guy is heading to the San Antonio Modern Quilt Guild‘s charity efforts. All it needs is binding!

Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | No Waste Flying Geese Method

See the Queen Size Quilt on these posts:

Garnet Fabric collection features 24 pieces. I added four more fabrics and a border to create this queen-size quilt below.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The second queen-size quilt is made with every shade of blue from my own fabric stash. It was wonderful to see something so scrappy and mixed up turn into something interesting.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps




Ticker Tape Giraffe Quilt Block

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Ticker Tape Giraffe Quilt

I recently posted a tutorial for this guy’s friend, Ticker Tape Owl. It was so fun to make using my fabric scraps, that I decided I needed a giraffe. Of course, he can be any color but if you have yellow, brown and orange fabrics, you’ll want to jump right in!

Scroll to the bottom to see how insanely fast you can create borders with an applied trim?used in the border of this project by simply using a Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide.

Finished size: 18? x 18? project sizes can vary depending on how you finish the block.

Supplies

Prep

The first thing you’ll need to do for this project is print the downloadable PDF Giraffe Template. Tape him together, matching his nose and neck lines.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

I used a shirt back from a thrift store garment. After measuring, a?14-1/2″ square will be as big as I can?cut.

Apply the fusible woven interfacing to the wrong side of the linen.

Ticker Tape Owl Quilt

If you are using the 1/2 yard linen for your background, you?can cut to any size you prefer. For my project, the background fabric is 14-1/2″ x 14-1/2″ and is cut after the interfacing is applied.

Mark the center of the linen square.

Use a window pane as a light box by taping the owl to the glass.

Tape the linen background over the template, matching the marked centers.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Use the water soluble marker?to trace the image onto the right side of the linen background square.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Ok. He looks good and I can see all his marked lines.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Fabric Scraps

Any scraps will work. All scraps will take a moment or two to sort and organize. I’m going with traditional-ish colors on this first giraffe.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

My ticker tape giraffe?uses pieces ranging from 1/4″ to 2″ in size. Work on a surface that will allow for ironing. By that I mean, a towel, portable ironing pad, or ironing board. Starting with the horns, arrange fabric scraps leaving a small space between each shape.

Keep the scissors close and trim scraps into needed shapes as you go.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Before moving onto another section, add a tiny dot of?glue behind each fabric scrap to secure it in place. Use an iron to set the glue.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Continue to add fabric scraps, trim as needed and glue baste them in place.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project
Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project
Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

This is the pile of “trimmings” from my already-small scraps. Whoa.
Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Secure the Scraps

Use?Sulky Monofilament Thread?and a free motion quilting foot to stitch around each shape. Why clear monofilament thread and not a coordinated color? Using the monofilament on the ticker tape fabric scraps will allow you to “travel” from shape to shape without needing to trim threads. Simply stitch on over to your next shape. No one will ever know.

Apply Trim to Borders

For the borders, unlike the owl which features a half square triangle border, this giraffe will have a solid yellow border with applied trim. We’ll miter the corners.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

I’m going with the brown single fold bias tape.

Since we will be mitering the corners of the border, cut 4 strips 2-1/2″ x 18-1/2″ from the yellow fat quarter of fabric.

Determine where you’ll place your trim. I’m placing mine 1/2″ from the cut edge. Once the border is applied, the trim will be 1/4″ from the block.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Apply Trim Using Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

You can measure this the whole length of the border, adding pins and hoping the pins don’t cause the trim to skew. OR you can use the 1/2″ guide mark on the Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide.

Simply line up the yellow cut edge of fabric with the solid grey 1/2″ mark. Lay the right side of the trim under the needle. As long as both of these two things are in place as you stitch, the trim will be applied accurately. I created a youtube video to show you how to apply trim. The video features a “demo project” so you’ll need to use our 1/2″ giraffe measurements when applying your trim.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Apply Trim Using Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Sew along the right side of the trim. Flip the piece and stitch along the left side.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Apply Trim Using Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Perfect. Ok. Now over to the design wall.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

I wanted to get an idea of how the giraffe ticker tape quilt would look once it was “framed.”

For my project, I hadn’t trimmed my block to 14-1/2″ x 14-1/2″. I did that right now, before I added any borders.

Add Borders

Fold the giraffe in half along each side, making a small crease with your finger.

Fold the borders in half to find their center.

Match right sides and pin the centers of the top and bottom borders to the giraffe block.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Use a 1/4″ seam allowance to join the border to the giraffe block. Start and stop 1/4″ from the cut edge of the block.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Pin the right and left sides to the block. Matching right sides and centers. Fold the top and bottom borders out of the way, gently as you stitch. Start and stop 1/4″ from the block’s cut edge.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Open all four borders and press the seam allowances towards the yellow fabric.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Your corner area should look like this:

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Miter the Corners

Work with only one corner at a time.

Fold the block at a 45 degree angle, matching the cut edges and seams of the border fabrics.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Pin the border, making sure the brown trim matches perfectly on the top and bottom fabric layers.

Using a quilter’s ruler, draw a line to extend the “fold” into the yellow border. The line will also be 45 degrees and should intersect the corner of your border strips.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

At the sewing machine, position your needle on the line, directly where your previous stitching lines stopped.Sew directly on the marked line to the corner.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Open the corner;?check that the trim matches and there are no “bubbles” created on the block at the corner seam. If you notice something you don’t like, simply rip the stitches, press the block flat and refold. Most of the time, errors come from:

  1. starting the stitching line in the wrong place
  2. not having the 45 degree fold accurate.

If it looks good, trim the excess fabric to create a 1/4″ seam allowance and press to one side.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project | Mitered Corner

Here’s the front:

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Repeat those mitering steps for all four corners.

Ticker Tape Giraffe Tutorial | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Fabric Scrap Project

Ah-dorable. This guy is ready to go!

Use a damp cloth or misting spray bottle of water to remove the ink marks.
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Giant No-Waste Flying Geese with Layer Cakes

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

Huge Giant Mega Flying Geese Quilt Block Tutorial

What if a person werta make the mega flying geese block using the No-Waste Flying Geese?method (which is found all over the internet) and precut 10″ squares? Well… that just might work!! I tested my idea and I’m happy to report the easy-peasey, HOLY-HUGE-BLOCK, Batman!, flying geese quilt block tutorial.

(There’s also a different complete quilt tutorial to create Giant Flying Geese from Fat Quarters.)

How big are we talkin? Ok, each traditional flying geese block (flying goose???) will measure 9-1/2″ x 18-1/2″ before is it joined into the quilt.Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Decide on the Size

Lap Size:

(This is the size I used for my rough-draft, bohemian, test quilt. I also used the bigger pieces from my fabric stash and scrap bin.)

Finished Quilt Size:?54″ x 54″

5 LARGE squares 19-1/4″ (purchase in three, 2/3 yard increments)
20 squares 9-7/8″ (cut from layer cake squares OR 5 fabric pieces cut 1/3 yard each)

You will make 20 geese units. You only need 18. Use the extra two on the back.

Queen Size:

(This is the size I used for my?Kaffe Fassett fabric version, shown at the end of this blog post.)

Finished Quilt Size: 72″ x 90″

10 LARGE squares 19-1/4″ (OR 3-1/3 yard. If you are making a “scrappier” quilt, purchase in five pieces, 2/3 yard increments)
40 squares 9-7/8″? (cut from layer cake squares OR 10 fabric pieces cut 1/3 yard each*)

*If you are using cut yardage for your 40 squares: From each 1/3 yard piece of fabric, cut 4 squares 9-7/8″ x 9-7/8″

No-Waste Flying Geese Method

For each no-waste construction block, you’ll need:

  • 1 large square
  • 4 smaller squares- For best results, trim 1/8″ off two sides of each 10″ square to create the 9-7/8″ squares. If you skip this step, and I know you want to, you may need to do more work in the squaring-up process once the geese unit is completed.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Mark a diagonal line on the wrong side of each smaller square using a non-permanent fabric pen.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Lay two smaller squares in opposite corners of the larger square. Make sure to match right sides and make the marked diagonal lines appear to connect across the entire large block. Pin.

Giant_Flying_Geese_Jen_Eskridge_3

Notice the cut edges meet at the outer corners.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Use a 1/4″ presser foot to stitch 1/4″ away from the marked line.

Flip the entire large square and stitch 1/4″ away from the marked line on the other side.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Cut the two halves apart with a rotary cutter.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

This will create a crazy heart-looking shape, which is how you’ll know you are on the right track.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Match right sides and pin one remaining square to the corner. The diagonal line should point from the V of the heart shape to the outer corner.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Stitch 1/4″ away from the marked diagonal line on the right and left sides.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Use a rotary cutter to cut along the marked diagonal line, just as you did before.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Each geese unit is 18-1/2″ x 9-1/2″.

I mean HUGE! The biggest challenge with making the flying geese is finding a surface big enough on which to mark and cut, but even that can be done in halves.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Trim the blocks if necessary, but remember there needs to be 1/4″ seam allowance extending past the point.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Each time you go through the no-waste construction process you will create 4 gianormous flying geese blocks.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily DesignsStitch all the required geese blocks for your quilt size.

Arrange Blocks

I recommend joining two flying geese blocks (with a 1/4″ seam allowance) to create an 18-1/2″ x 18-1/2″ square block to use in your design arrangement.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Traditional flying geese seem to fly in one direction, or at least fly in one direction per vertical column.

I decided to mix it up. You’ll notice I used 18 of my 20 flying geese. I’ll have two left over to work into the backing fabric. … or lets be real, this was so incredibly fast to make, I might save the geese to start a second quilt top.

Join blocks using an 1/4″ seam allowance. Pin at all intersections and points for accuracy.Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Quilting

Ok, these geese are bigger than the quilt-able area of the longarm. Wow. That is HUGE.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Longarm Quilting

I picked a fast fast fast loop design, but neglected to realize with the geese being so large, I would have to roll the quilt up and down for each block. #learningcurve

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Longarm Quilting

I ended up using left over geese in the quilt backing: two, left over from the pattern directions and an additional four more from my “will this even work” block. I joined my geese and then framed them in fabric from my stash.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Longarm Quilting

Here’s the front of the 54″ x 54″ quilt.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Longarm Quilting

And a couple more quilting pics before I go to my leftover bindings pile to add a scrappy finish to this every-color-quilt with every-color-binding.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Longarm Quilting
Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Longarm QuiltingGiant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Longarm Quilting

Queen Size

Since the “test” size worked, I decided to make the queen size quilt, too!! Y’all, I made this queen size in one day. This would be the perfect project to pack on a quilt retreat!

There’s so much Kaffe Fassett fabric from which to choose, but here’s what I bought:

  • 5 pieces of yellows 2/3 yard each
  • 5 pieces of blue/green/purple at 2/3 yard each

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

I cut my fabrics into the 19-1/4″ x 19-1/4″ squares and the smaller 9-7/8″ x 9-7/8″ squares. (as described in the directions above) I did sort the piles to keep some order to mixed up plan. I have the smaller squares flipped over in the photo so I could quickly mark the diagonal lines one their wrong sides.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

Then, I followed the directions above to create the 40 flying geese blocks.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

I did some serious assembly-line sewing.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

When it came to piecing the geese together, I made sure to pin the seams, points and other intersections. I used the 1/4″ mark on my Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide. There are 120 points on this quilt and I really wanted to see them all.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

I started arranging the blocks in every direction, just like the test quilt.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

I am loving how this big ole 72″ x 90″ quilt came together. (Whoa, I need better lighting in the studio!)

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

I learned my lesson quilting the test quilt and decided to try an all-over, edge-to-edge design when I free motion quilted this big guy on the longarm.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

Just a note- I saved all the extra fabric pieces when cutting and was able to eek out the binding (cut 8 strips 2-1/4″ x WOF) from the initial fabric purchase. Awesome!!

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

The quilt is so bright and festive thanks to the fabrics. I’m loving how it turned out.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

Huge thanks to a couple of my friends, Sarah R and Stacy P, in the San Antonio Modern Quilt Guild who inspired me with their half-square triangle version of larger flying geese!
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