Find Quilts Around the World on Instagram

ReannaLily Designs Profile Pic on Instagram - Jen Eskridge

Customize an International Instagram Feed!

Instagram is a wonderful photo-based networking platform perfect for creative inspiration. Of course, Instagram has gone through many changes over the years but there are still ways to see your favorite content. Make your instagram feed international by including hashtags from many other languages. Today, I want to share with you my trick for seeing quilts from all over the world.

Hashtags

First, lets talk hashtags. If you don’t already know, a hashtag is a # symbol followed by words that basically creates an imaginary folder (and automatic search filter) for everyone to use.  Instagram and Twitter seem to be the primary users of social hashtags.

Hashtags in Profile

Instagram has allowed users to add hashtags into their profiles. In my own profile, I’ve added #reannalilydesigns to see all posts about my business & folks making things from my patterns, #reannalilyquilts to feature things I’ve quilted for myself or others, and #fmfwq & #freemotionframework to showcase all the projects and promotions for the new book, Free-Motion Framework. On someone’s profile page, you can click on any hashtag to see more images with that tag.

Hashtags in Photo Descriptions

An instagram user may also add any kind of hashtag into their image description. Just like hashtags in a profile, you can click on one to see more similar images from anyone on the internet.

These were used on a recent customer’s gorgeous quilt. Her Metro Rings quilt was made using the Quick Curve Ruler, so I thought it’d be fun to associate the posts with other image that have used the same ruler and other machine quilting hashtags:  #quickcurveruler#customerquilt#loveit, #reannalilyquilts, #reannalilydesigns, #ilovemyjob, #longarmquilting, #machinequilting, #freemotionquilting, #quiltedfeathers, #feathers, #sewkindofwonderful, #fmq, #freemotionquilting#dwrquilt, #doubleweddingring

*Note- In the actual description, you don’t need commas between hashtags.

Customize Your International Instagram Feed

Armed with the information on hashtags, it got me thinking: I should search for tags in other languages. Unfortunately, I don’t know any other languages fluently. (Does sarcasm and pig latin count? No.)

Google Translate to the rescue! Now sure, Google Translate is sometimes a disaster, but it does know more than I do when it comes to quilty vocabulary. I started here, with Spanish:

Google Translate Quilting to Spanish

Ok, now I have a word to grow search and browse. You don’t need the right word, or the most trending word, you just need a starting point. Just like on my own photo description, I used similar tags like #longarmquilting,  #machinequilting, #freemotionquilting, the odds are someone using the #acolchado tag may also have related words.

  • Type the new-to-you hashtag in to the search bar on Instagram.
  • Scroll through to see images that appeal to you.
  • Click the photo to see more hashtags in the description.
  • Select a few hashtags by clicking on them to see what comes up.
  • Follow any hashtags you find appealing by clicking the blue “follow” button at the top of your mobile device.

In this case, #acolchado yields commercial bedding, though I found a hand-made machine quilted image that also contained the hashtag #patchdelourdes. Click it. I also typed it in to translate, and it means “heavy patch.” Ok. Sure thing. That hashtag has much more quilty images for me. The cycle begins…

ReannaLily Designs Profile Pic on Instagram - Jen Eskridge - Learn to see Quilts in from other countries on Instagram

Now see at the top of the screen where it says “Follow” on the blue button? Click it and you’ll get to see new images when someone uses the hashtag you just decided to follow. It is awesome. This button doesn’t appear on your pc or computer, only tablet & mobile, I believe.

One thing to note is the number of instances that hashtag occurs. In this case, 223. You find tags that have hundreds of thousands and you may find tags with 10-20. Pick what you like, and if you start seeing less-fun or less-inspiring posts, simply unfollow that tag for a while.

What I Follow

As of right now, here are just a few hashtags I’m following:

Note: It looks like the special characters from other languages aren’t showing up on mobile devices  if you click the links, they’ll still open correctly in Instagram.

The possibilities are endless! Those can get you started. Good luck!! Of course, you can do this with any hobby or interest. You will find some fantastic projects out there!

If you are bilingual or follow quilty & sewing hashtags from another languauge, I’d love to see them! Share them in the comments.

 

 




Green and Orange Scrap Quilt Wall Hanging

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily QuiltsScrap Quilt: Wall hanging

Today, I’d like to share my recent scrap quilt finish. As you know, I enjoy a good scrap quilt! This small wall hanging is was originally set to be two colors: orange and green. I decided early on, though, that I’d like the greens to move from light to dark outward from the center.

Starting with many fabric pieces I made little sections of fabric large enough for each template. This is the technique of Made Fabric that Victoria Findlay Wolfe uses in her book, 15 Minutes of Play. I used a triangle template for the greens and a diagonal 6″ wide template for the orange. I don’t have the templates to share today, but they are easy to make.

Making Templates

Supplies

  • Blank Paper or Scratch Paper
  • Ruler
  • Scotch Tape
  • Pencil

Drafting

  • Tape sheets of paper larger than your finished block size. I opted to create my blocks to be 15″ square when finished.
  • Draw a 15″ square in the center of the page.
  • Add a 1/4″ seam allowance around the entire square.
  • Lightly draw a diagonal line from one corner to the other.
  • Measure and draw a line 3″ to the right and left of the diagonal to create a 6″ diagonal bar.
  • Cut the paper apart on the diagonal drawn lines.
  • Tape paper behind the new cut to add 1/4″ seam allowances.

This technique works for any shape and for any size. If you want your diagonal bar to be 2″ wide, you can do it. If you’d like to make the block more complicated, try that, too.
Draw. Cut. Seam Allowance.

How It Started

I didn’t always love the quilt. I started thinking the contrast between green and orange would be enough to make this quilt visually “work.” Boy, I was wrong. Check out the left side of the quilt.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Each block is 15-1/2″ square, but it wasn’t until I added in little black strips did the quilt start to pop. Those lines give the eyes somewhere to rest in this sea of green and orange.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Of course, now the blocks do not measure 15-1/2″. That is alright, I’d just have to cut them down a bit before adding them together.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

This quilt lived on my design wall for quite a while before deciding to add more fabric, or simply quilt and finish it. I opted for the later. Maybe because it was a gift? Maybe because it was a creative-block? Either way, no other fabrics were added. I was ready to load this guy onto the longarm.

Machine Quilting

So much thinking and over-thinking went into the quilting design of this project. Thankfully, once I started, it became clear that the quilting really didn’t show up that well on so many wild fabrics. I could quilt anything I wanted and didn’t have to go back to the over-thinking step. Wahoo! The orange bands all have the same meander design and each green area, light, medium and dark, have different filling designs.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

And as you’d expect, the plain white back really showcases the quilt design.

Green and orange scrap quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLiy Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

This gift has been shared with its new owner, the college student who will be attending school with these colors. She was surprised even though she saw me working on it for the past few weeks. Funny how that works out, right? She says she didn’t put it together that it was her college colors until I told her.




Fabric for Military Retirement Chevron Quilt

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That FabricCelebrating a Military Retirement

In my recent post, I shared the first quilt which celebrates a military retirement. If one quilt is good, at least two or three is better, right? This is the second military retirement quilt for another member of the family. This time, I used the Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern to make a quick quilt.

As I mention in my lectures and in the book Deploy That Fabric, when quilting, I treat the military uniform as a neutral. If green and shades of green match everything in the garden, they can match everything in a quilt. Also, the nature of camouflage is to blend in, so place it where ever you like!

Deploy That Fabric Cover

Fabrics

Working exclusively from my own fabric stash, I pull nine fabrics that measure at least 21″ x width of fabric. I spent a bit of time trying to rearrange them in a suitable order as they will stay in this order for the Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern.

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

The Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern

Using the very-fast No-Waste Flying Geese method and giant sizes listed in the free Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern, I got to work. The quilt top really does finish up in a weekend. Here are the highlights for construction:

  • Mark a diagonal line on the wrong side of all four smaller 10″ squares.
  • Lay two squares on the 19-1/4? larger square, matching right sides, to create a large diagonal line.
  • Pin pieces together, perpendicular to the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Sew 1/4? from the marked line on the right and left sides.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open the smaller triangles and press the seam allowances towards the smaller triangles. If you’ve created two slightly-weird heart shapes, you are on the right track.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Lay the remaining 10? squares on each of the larger triangle pieces; making sure the diagonal line points “deep in the heart.” Easy to remember, right?
  • Sew 1/4? from the right and left of the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.
  • Each pile of five fabric pieces will yield four large flying geese blocks.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Check out the entire free pattern here: Chevron Grande Quilt Pattern.
Next, sew the flying geese units in to nine rows.

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

Quilting

To the surprise of everyone on the planet, I didn’t take pictures while I was quilting this project. I will tell you though, quilting over the military uniform pieces was a breeze with my HandiQuilter Avante and size 110 needles. I quilted over welt seams, though I did not stitch over the name tape.

I do have one image to share with you. One photo to scare you a bit.

What you are seeing is the very bottom edge of the quilt. The entire piece was quilted with a spiked swirl edge-to-edge free-motion quilting design. I was be-boppin along, and as I came to the end of the quilt, I spent a small bit of time convincing myself that I did indeed measure the quilt back. Surely. I must have, right? Or maybe I was laying it on the floor and guessing I had enough fabric. I really wasn’t sure.

The red snapper (plastic) you see in the image allows me to load the quilt onto the frame in a matter of minutes. It is also about 3/4″ wide, for reference. I’d say I definitely got this a way too close! And in the very next breath, I’ll say, “See, look- 1 inch is plenty of room. No-Waste EVERYTHING!” *insert maniacal laughter*

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

The Quilt

The military quilt is finished and on to its new home.Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

The fabrics are quite busy, so I’m not sure how well you can see the quilting. You can see even less on the backing, this time.

Military Retirement Uniform Quilt by Jen Eskridge Deploy That Fabric

If you need a quick project, I highly recommend the Chevron Grande Quilt PatternAnd of course, if you have an occasion to sew with military uniforms, please check out the book, Deploy That Fabric.




Chevron Grande: A HUGE Flying Geese Tutorial

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Chevron Grande Quilt Tutorial

A HUGE Flying Geese Project

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Make this Chevron Grande Quilt using only nine pieces of fabric! My guess is you may already own nine pieces of fabric measuring 21″ x width of fabric. Using my HUGE Flying Geese measurements and construction methods, this large quilt, 72″ x 81″, stitches up so quickly. Grab your nine fabrics, and make it with me! Share yours using the hashtag #chevrongrande on Instagram.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Supplies:

  • 21″ of nine different fabrics (for Chevron triangles) When I choose my fabrics, I made sure each piece related to the two pieces next to it. They don’t all match each other, they only match their immediate neighbors. Even then, heck, who cares if they don’t match.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • 20″ binding fabric

Cutting:

  • Cut eight strips 2-1/2″ (OR 2-1/4″) wide from binding fabric. Use your preferred width. I cut 2-1/4″ binding strips.

From each of the nine pieces of fabric,

  • Cut one 19-1/4″ square
  • Cut four 10″ squares

Tip: When I cut my fabrics, I carefully laid out four fabric pieces in a stack and cut all four different color fabrics at once. Using a big cutting mat helped tremendously. I then stacked the remaining five pieces to cut those all at once, too. Super fast stuff.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Organize Your Cut Fabrics

The trickiest part of this pattern is arranging the fabrics. Keep these two details in mind:

  • Each of the large 19-1/4″ squares will become the four large triangles of a row. They form the “goose” area of the block.
  • The four 10″ matching the larger triangles must be stitched and added to the next row. They will form the “sky” area of the block.

Download this diagram to keep by your sewing station and mark which fabrics will be placed in which rows. It is a huge time saver for quilty-organization.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Using the diagram above, I grouped my fabrics and laid them out in small piles of five pieces, in the order they will be in rows on my quilt. (Note: The real life fabrics are different than the digital mock-up shown above.)

  • Fabric 1 small squares stitches to Fabric 2 LARGE square
  • Fabric 2 small Square stitches to Fabric 3 LARGE square
  • Fabric 3 small Square stitches to Fabric 4 LARGE square
  • Fabric 4 small Square stitches to Fabric 5 LARGE square
  • Fabric 5 small Square stitches to Fabric 6 LARGE square
  • Fabric 6 small Square stitches to Fabric 7 LARGE square
  • Fabric 7 small Square stitches to Fabric 8 LARGE square
  • Fabric 8 small Square stitches to Fabric 9 LARGE square
  • Fabric 9 small Square stitches to Fabric 1 LARGE square

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily DesignsChevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

No-Waste Flying Geese Method of Construction

This method of piecing the traditional flying geese block can be found all over the internet. I simply super-sized it. Wait until you see how big our geese are. They will be 18-1/2″ x 9-1/2″ before they are stitched into the finished quilt design.

To keep the rows in order, I stitch using one, five-piece pile at a time.

  • Mark a diagonal line on the wrong side of all four 10″ squares.
  • Lay two squares on the 19-1/4″ larger square, matching right sides, to create a large diagonal line.
  • Pin pieces together, perpendicular to the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Sew 1/4″ from the marked line on the right and left sides.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open the smaller triangles and press the seam allowances towards the smaller triangles. If you’ve created two slightly-weird heart shapes, you are on the right track.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Lay the remaining 10″ squares on each of the larger triangle pieces; making sure the diagonal line points “deep in the heart.” Easy to remember, right?
  • Sew 1/4″ from the right and left of the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Cut along the marked line.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Open and press seam allowances towards the smaller triangle.
  • Each pile of five fabric pieces will yield four large flying geese blocks.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • You may opt to sew the four geese together into a row now, so they do not get mixed up later. OR: roll the dice, live on the edge, run with the bulls and leave them in a tidy stack to stitch later. You, my friend, are WILD & DANGEROUS!
  • Repeat these steps with the remaining eight piles of fabric to create all 36 flying geese units.

Construct The Quilt

  • If you have not already, stitch each of the-same-color-type flying geese to itself to form nine rows.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

  • Join the rows to create the quilt top. Make sure to pin at each intersection as the contrast in fabric colors will be noticeable if there’s a large shift in the seam at that point.

Chevron Grande - Flying Geese Sewing Quilt Tutorial - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Finishing

The quilt top is complete. Of course, if you’d like to make it larger, you may opt to frame the design by adding borders.

Next, create a quilt sandwich with backing, batting and the top and quilt as desired. Or, if you like, send the top to a longarm quilter. I’d be happy to finish your project. Read more about my longarm quilting services at ReannaLilyQuilts.com.

Finally, bind using the eight strips cut at the beginning of the project. Use your favorite binding method.




Patriotic Quilt Round Up

Red White and Blue Quilt Tutorial Round Up by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Red, White, and Blue

Red, White and Blue is the theme for this how-to tutorial round up! As I’ve started to create more and more quilts for veterans, I noticed a themed collection in the works. I’m happy to share my quilts and quilt pattern tutorials here, all in one place.

For the most part, when I approach a quilt pattern to adapt it to look patriotic, I treat the fabric requirements as “all shades of red” with “all shades of blue” and “as many whites as I own.” This works for any three-color quilts. The quilt will look scrappy as I’ve cut the red pieces from as many reds as I have in my own fabric stash. Same with blues and whites.

If the quilt pattern is a two-color quilt or has an even balance of background and foreground pieces, I simply treat all backgrounds as white and all foregrounds as red and blue. You can do this with any pattern you already own. Of course, if you switch that up (i.e. all backgrounds are red and blue; all foregrounds are white,) you’ll turn out a completely different quilt still using the one original pattern!

HUGE Cross and Plus Quilt

Ohio Star Barn Quilt

Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes

Patriotic Wonky Star Quilt Tutorial

Patriotic Disappearing 9-Patch with 10″ Precut Squares


Red, White OR Blue

Sometimes a more monochromatic look is just what you need. Turns out, side-by-side these two monochromatic quilts look great together as Red and White or Blue and White quilts. Incidentally, both quilts below are made from the same Giant Flying Geese tutorial.

Giant Fat Quarter Flying Geese – Queen Size

Blue Flying Geese: Queen-Size Quilt




Disappearing 9-Patch With Layer Cakes BABY QUILTS

Disappearing 9-Patch is quite popular. My blog tutorial for this quilt style made with 10″ precut squares, Layer Cakes, is one of my most popular. Readers and quilt class students often ask how to create the Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes in a smaller size. Well, I have great news! This tutorial will show you how to create TWO small quilts from one precut fabric bundle and a small bit of yardage. Don’t you love that bright layer cake?

Fabric designer, Patty Young of Mod Kid Boutique, asked a few pattern designer/bloggers to take her beautiful new collection for Riley Blake for a test drive. I’m thrilled to showcase her line Flit and Bloom in this tutorial.

Skill Level:

Super Easy Beginner

Finished Size:

Two Quilts approx 64″ x 64″

Supplies:

1 Layer Cake* Flit and Bloom by Patty Young is featured in this tutorial.

2 1/3 y white polka dot yardage (Bloom Scalloped Dot)

2/3 y pink fabric, border of quilt one

2/3 y grey fabric, border of quilt two

1/2 y binding for EACH quilt

*Layer Cake is a precut 10″ x 10″ square fabric bundle with at least 40 pieces. 40 pieces are used in this tutorial. The term “layer cake” is a trademark of Moda Fabrics.

Cut Quilt Pieces:

32 total white squares
From the yardage, cut 8 strips at 10″ wide


From the 8 strips, cut 4 squares 10″ x 10″ each

TIP: Using a large cutting mat, stack sets of strips to make faster cuts.

Construction:

Remove two 10″ squares from the precut pack. In this case, I removed the Bloom Scalloped Dot, since it is going to be used elsewhere in the quilt design. These two will not be used. Also count out eight white squares. Set these aside. You will use them.

Make eight basic, although GIANT 9-patch blocks using four white squares and five prints. Stitch using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Grab a Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide to make sure your 1/4″ seam is always accurate.

To assemble the quilt quickly, I used a serger. Here’s why:

  • You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine.
  • You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever.
  • The seams are wrapped neatly together making them easy to press.
  • This quilt doesn’t require pins or detailed piece-work.

Chain-piece 24 pairs of print and white fabrics. Grab them at random. No need to plan colors at this stage of the game.

Cut the pairs apart with scissors.

At this point, you will have 16 unstitched prints. And, don’t forget the 8 white squares, which you set aside earlier.

Sew a print OR white to each of the 24 pairs. Keep the alternating pattern. Print-White-Print OR White-Print-White.

Now, create a basic 9-patch block using these three-piece units.

Make eight total huge blocks.

Slice each 9-patch block into perfect quarters. Honestly, this is the hardest step because you’ll want to make sure you cut the pieces exactly in half, and you’ll need a large space to rotary cut them.

Sliced 9 Patch

Start by folding the large block in half, making sure the vertical seam lines lay on each other. You’ll be able to feel a little ridge where the seam is underneath what you can see.

Using a large ruler, line up one vertical seam line with the 4-3/4″ mark. Cut.

Open, turn and layer the halves, matching seam lines again to make the second cut.

Using a large ruler, line up one vertical seam line with the 4-3/4″ mark. Cut.

Wow. These are BIG quarter pieces.

This tutorial makes TWO quilts. Each quilt will use 16 quarter-squares laid out in a 4 x 4 grid. Every quarter will be used.

Start by sewing pairs of quarters in the exact same arrangement. See the small square in the northwest corner of block one and southwest corner of block two? Stay consistent when sewing all pairs in this fashion.

Once the pairs are stitched, join two together to form a four piece row. Add them to a design wall, large table, or floor to arrange the colors and focus fabrics. Each quilt will only have four rows, and alternating rows will be flipped 180 degrees (from the image shown above). This will make sense as you lay it out.

Quilt 1:

Add the third row.

Add the last row.

Quilt 2

Cut Border and Binding Pieces

From each of the 2/3 yard grey and pink fabrics, cut six 4-1/2″ x width of fabric strips.


From each of the 1/2 yard binding fabrics, cut six 2-1/2″ x width of fabric strips.

Add Borders

  • Each quilt should be approximately 56″ square right now.
  • Sew two sets of border strips together at the short ends.
  • Apply to the right and left sides of the quilt.
  • Trim excess
  • Sew excess to remaining two border strips.
  • Add each of those to the top and bottom of the quilt.

Quilt

Flit and Bloom- Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes Baby Quilts by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Flit and Bloom- Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes Baby Quilts by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Each of these tops were finished with different quilting designs. The quilt with grey borders got a special treatment with wishbones the border, teardrops in the corners, and a swirl edge-to-edge (e2e) design.

The quilt with pink borders has only a swirled flower edge-to-edge (e2e) over the entire quilt. There was no special border design treatment.

Binding

Use your favorite binding method to apply continuous binding to each quilt.

Thank you so much for browsing and stitching this tutorial!

Huge thanks to Patty Young and Riley Blake Fabrics for having me on the Flit and Bloom fabric tour. Check out other stops on the tour here:

Flit and Bloom- Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes Baby Quilts by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

———————————————————————————-
Can I quilt for you? Check out my work & hire me at Reannalilyquilts.com

This post contains affiliate links.



Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern is a pretty popular free tutorial here on my blog. I decided to create another quilt using the same pattern, but mixing up the background and foreground fabric placement. I’m calling this one the Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch. I’ll show you how easy it is to make this design appear completely different.

Check this out! This is the exact same quilt pattern:

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Quilt Pattern

Scroll up. Seriously, the two above quilts look completely different!

Constructing the Quilt

In both quilts, I cut my own pile of 10″ fabric squares. These precuts are affectionately known as a Layer Cake, though I believe Moda Fabrics does have the trademark on the actual name. I’ll show you how the inverted design works. In the original pattern the red/blue (foreground) colors were placed in the corners and center.

For the alternate version, the foreground colors are placed to make a “plus.” You can see in the photos below, I’ve already done the slashing step.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts
Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

If you are diggin the military uniform in this quilt, you may love the Deploy that Fabric book. It features 23 different patterns to use military uniforms. In the book, there’s a guide as to how to break down a uniform to yield flat workable pieces which will incorporate into your next project or pattern. (***Note: This 9-Patch Quilt is NOT in the book. It is a free tutorial from ReannaLily Designs.)

Ok, back to the quilt, following the original Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern, I simply rotated the upper right and lower left blocks. You’ll notice two little squares meet at the center, that is how you can tell the block layouts are identical.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

From here, I arranged the HUGE quarter blocks per the original diagram.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

To actually assemble the quilt I used a serger. As I’ve mentioned before:

  • You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine.
  • You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever.
  • The seams are wrapped neatly together making them easy to press.
  • This quilt doesn’t require pins or detailed piece-work.

Quilting the Patriotic Quilt

For many of the red, white, and blue quilts, I like to quilt them quickly featuring a meandering star design.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Instead of trying to fill the whole stitch-able space on my longarm, I really work edge-to-edge (e2e) in a reasonably straight line. Couple loops. Free-hand star. Couple more loops. Free-hand star. Once I reach the end, I simply head back the other direction. Everything is orderly and fast to finish.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Once the quilt is washed, this design is going to look fantastic. If you need a quilt finished by a longarm quilter, feel free to check out my longarm quilting services at ReannaLily Quilts.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

This Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch (with Layer Cakes) is going to be given to a wonderfully hard-working high school teacher & veteran!

AND, this quilt is part of the Bloggers Quilt Festival! See all the festival quilts here.




Celebrate National Sew A Jelly Roll Day

What is a jelly roll? It goes by many names, but the trademarked name, Jelly Roll, is by Moda fabrics is a 40-42 piece fabric bundle of 2-1/2″ strips of fabric. The fabric is cut “straight off the bolt” so each piece is as wide as the width of fabric, 42″-44″. Pick up your own Jelly Roll in a variety of different colors and styles, here. There are many tutorials featuring the precut pieces and today I wanted to share with you a few things created here in the studio over the years. Celebrate National Sew a Jelly Roll Day with these quilt ideas.

Batik Braid Quilt

This is by-far the most popular tutorial on my blog, to date. It may be one of the older how-to’s posted, but it is still a great one. See how easy it is to create a braided look with your fabric using this Batik Braid tutorial.

Batik Braid Quilt Tutorial by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The Infamous 1600 Quilt

This is the first quilt style that had me busting open my purchased jelly roll fabrics. It is a simple pattern and free tutorial (from the internet, not from me) where you stitch the short ends of the 2-1/2″ cut pieces together to form a strip, roughly 1600″ long. Yes, 1600″. From there you fold the strip, sew a seam, fold again, sew a seam, fold again, etc. You’ll see what I mean when you watch the Jelly Roll Race on this sewing tutorial.Jelly Roll Race | 1600 Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily DesignsAdding Military Fabric to 1600″ Quilts

The Jelly Roll Race or 1600″ quilt (linked above) is addicting. I did notice, though, that I could incorporate my own fabrics to create a more interesting look when blended with precut 2-1/2″ strips. I ended up making quilts and adding fabrics for each branch of the service, for a special project. I had help on this big collection. Thanks to my weekend sewing team! Mixing military uniform fabrics and bright quilter’s cottons is the foundation for my book, Deploy That Fabric. Check it out.

Cut Your Own Roll

Once I started cutting and adding in military uniforms, I realized, I could easily cut my own jelly roll. Lord knows, I have a small bit of fabric to work with. I’m guessing you do, too. The next quilt in my project showcase features orange and green fabrics. The twist: These strips are 3″ wide to make for a bigger quilt. Neat trick, right? See more quilt pictures here.

This orange quilt turned out really well once I covered it in quilted feathers.

ReannaLily Quilts | Feathers | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Quilting Service

Ruffle Bag

With any leftover precut pieces, either from a jelly roll or from quilt binding, which most quilters cut to be 2-1/2″ x width of fabric, you can make this small ruffle bag. The ruffle is scrap pieces! And by the way, how fun is that? Saving all the binding strip scraps to later have your own wildly unique “jelly roll.”

Scrappy Dresden Wedge

Using the precut pieces to create strip-sets, you’ll be able to achieve a very scrappy look on your next giant Dresden wedge quilt. Learn how to lengthen the wedge template and create a nearly 36″ diameter scrappy Dresden.

Serger Strip Quilt

One thing I love about jelly roll quilts is that they largely start with straight-line-sewing. No points are matched; no intersections are pinned. For this reason, you can really jam-out the first few steps on a serger. Check out how easy it is to serge up strip-sets and make subcuts to create this dynamic quilt.

Scrappy Trip Around The World

My quilt guild hosted a “Scrappy Trip Along” quilting project following the pattern provided by Bonnie Hunter of Quiltville. I ended up making three quilts using that pattern, during that summer challenge. This Scrappy Trip Around the World was one of my favorites.

*This post contains affiliate links.




Disappearing 4-Patch With Layer Cakes

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily QuiltsMake a Disappearing 4-Patch Queen-Sized Quilt in a weekend! Learn the tricks to use precut 10″ squares (Layer Cakes), ruler stacking, and a serger to make quick work of this bright, large quilt. When this baby is finished and bound it measures 76″ x 95″. Yes, it is that big.

You’ve probably seen the disappearing 4-patch design in many places. The most popular tutorial I’ve found is from Missouri Star Quilt Co. Man, I love their videos. But here’s the thing, I’m not going to use 5″ squares. I want to go BIG!!!  You may know I’ve been on a super-size-it kick with Giant Flying Geese and HUGE 9-Patch quilts. I’ve adapted the design to bring you this how-to tutorial to feature 10″ squares.

Let’s dive in!

Supplies

2 stacks of 40 pc 10″ precut squares (One print, one solids)
2/3 yard binding
24″ rotary cutting ruler
Smaller back-up ruler

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Construction

To create this quilt, the first thing you’ll need to do is create a simple 4-patch quilt block. Open both layer cake packs. We’ll work with 40 prints and 40 solids. This means you need to remove two squares, since these bundles are actually sold in 42 piece collections. (Check your package, though. Different manufacturers will include different number of squares!)

Start by joining pairs: one print + one solid.

You can certainly tackle this step with a sewing machine and 1/4″ presser foot. I decided to stitch faster using my 21 year old Juki serger.

Using the Serger

Why using the serger works for this project:

  1. You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine.
  2. You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever.
  3. The seams are wrapped neatly together making them easy to press.
  4. This quilt doesn’t require pins or detailed piece-work.

Having said that, once you commit to using the serger, you’ll need to be more mindful when joining pieces. Turns out ripping out 4 threads per seam is a really pain in the booty.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

It’ll be ok. Ripping is more tedious, but definitely not hard to remove that serger seam. The speed of assembly outweighs the couple seams I had to un-sew and re-sew.

Keep sewing!

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Chain piece those babies together! Whiz, zip, bammo. Look at the serger go!

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Cut them apart and press the seam allowance towards the print side.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Join the pairs to form a 4-patch block.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Press.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

You’ll have a total of twenty 4-patch blocks.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Slice

The magic to this block is the slicing. On a smaller 4-patch, it is easier to turn the block to create the four slices. I have a trick for you to make it every bit as easy on this larger, almost 20″ block.

Here’s what we are aiming to make:

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

First, using a long 24″ ruler, lay the ruler 2″ from the center seam.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Make the first long vertical cut 2″ to the right of center.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Here comes the Ruler Stacking tip!

Without moving a thing, lay a smaller back-up ruler 2″ to the left of center.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Do not cut anything! Instead, lay the long 24″ ruler along the back-up.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Now, remove the smaller back-up ruler.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Now, rotary cut at the exact place your larger ruler is positioned, which is 2″ to the left of center.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Without rotating the block, I repeated these steps for the horizontal slice.

Place the long ruler 24″ north of center. Slice.

Use the ruler stacking method to get 2″ south of center.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Remove the back up ruler.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Slice. Now we have 9-patches to sew together in a simple quilt block.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Rearrange to Sew 9-Patch Blocks

There are many variations around the internet as to which fabrics you’ll want to move to create which look in this new 9-patch block. For this design we aren’t really moving anything, making it a bit more fool-proof.

Simply rotate the long rectangles 180 degrees.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

If you think of you 9-patch in terms of Bradys, simply flip:

  • Carol
  • Jan
  • Mike
  • Peter

If Brady's Were Quilt Blocks

Once your block is arranged with the rectangles flipped, sew pairs to form rows and sew the rows to create a 9-patch block.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Keep sewing.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Really, we only have a total of twenty 9-patch blocks to create.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

These really do go together quickly.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Finishing the Quilt

I opted to assemble my top in a random color placement style. Code: I just wanted to sew everything together without worrying about the design wall or having certain colors fade into other colors. You know what this means? It is going to go fast, too! Just grab two squares and stitch them together.

The entire quilt is created in a 4-block by 5-block grid.

Sew all the blocks in pairs first.

Then sew two pairs together to form 5 total rows.

Then join the 5 rows.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

I opted to longarm this quilt the same afternoon.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

It is loaded up with a vintage thrift shop sheet on the back. I do love thrift shop vintage sheets, and this sheet was a grid, which totally matched the grid on the front of the quilt, in my mind.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

For the longarm quilting:

  • Wishbone designs in the narrow rectangle pairs
  • Twelve weird feather shapes in the main squares
  • Small arches are in the small checker-board intersections.

For one of the first times, I actually stitched-in-the-ditch around most every shape, too. I’m diggin how it turned out.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Here’s some texture.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Of course, natural light is best for photos. The images below are more true to the actual color of the quilt.

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts
Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily QuiltsThis quilt was pretty fun (fast) to create and really great to use two layer cakes!

Disappearing 4-Patch with Layer Cakes by Jen Eskridge | Queen Size Quilt | Free Pattern | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

*This post contains affiliate links.




Blue Flying Geese: Queen-Size Quilt

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

It seems I’m currently obsessed with Giant Flying Geese. The newest queen-size quilt in the Giant Flying Geese collection is created from every blue shade in my own fabric stash.

Speaking of fabric stash:

  • Smaller scraps (bigger than 2″ and too small to properly fold to store) sorted by color in ziploc bags. The ziplocs are then stored in a plastic tub.
  • Larger scraps  (big enough to fold, but not a fat quarter OR a big piece that has a weird shape cut out of a portion of it) folded, sorted by color in a plastic tub.
  • Fat Quarters (only the square ones, not actual 1/4 yard cuts) sorted by color in two fabric bins in the cubbies.

Ok, so now that we’ve gone through the scraps it was time to cut!

  • 56 squares measuring 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″  NOTE: I created an 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″ square template from paper to lay over each scrap to determine if it was big enough. Huge time saver!
  • 14 squares measuring 17-1/4″  x 17-1/4″

Since this was scrappy, I knew I wanted scrappy binding. Each time I had a bit extra fabric, I’d cut off a 2-1/4″ x width to use later at the end of the project. I also stored all those in a ziploc bag because I didn’t want to lose them before the quilt was finished.

Using the No-Waste Flying Geese Method on this large scale, detailed on the original pattern post, I whipped up 56 flying geese blocks in a weekend.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Ok. that is going well. There’s a simple method to planning a quilt this larger without a design wall.

  • Start with 56 geese.
  • Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all.
  • Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column.
  • Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs.
  • Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column.
  • Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column.
  • Add a border if you like.

Ta’dah – super scrappy with no design wall or stress. THAT is how I can finish quilt tops in a weekend. I heart math. (sometimes)

Now to the machine quilting! Unlike the other quilts created in this style, I didn’t treat each triangle individually. Instead, I stitch swirls over the entire design.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Working from right to left, I was on a roll! That is, until I hit a bump. Not a real bump, but rather an adorable giant doggy speed-bump. Turns out this was the perfect spot to lay in the afternoon. In her defense, I did have a purple box fan blowing beside me.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

My quilting stance started to look like a yoga pose, as to not wake the helper-dog.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

The light in the longarm room, which some may call “The Formal Dining Room” (HA!), is perfect. The quilting pictures turn out so neat.
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

All aboard the binding train! Most everything I quilt is finished with machine-applied and machine-finished binding. There’s a large table in my sewing room to support the weight of the quilt, and I think that is the main reason that I actually enjoy the binding step.

I found the trusty ziploc of binding-size scraps and stitched them end-to-end. Remember, I was just cutting and cutting and cutting pieces to add to the bag? I wanted to make sure I had enough, but really, this seems excessive:

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

There is only one single thing I do not like about scrappy binding; and dangit, if it doesn’t happen more often than not:

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Seam right in the corner! DANGIT. DANGIT. Generally I just take the quilt out from under the machine, cut out the seam, and re-join the binding further up along the stitched side. Yes, the ever-popular seam ripper will be involved. Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

I wish this was a before picture (below), but alas, it is not. I had enough scrap binding left over to finish up a baby quilt. OOOOOPS!!!

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Ready to see the finished quilt photographed in glaring sunlight? Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

My assistant did another fantastic job holding the quilt. He’s not digging the glaring sunlight either. #gamer

Thanks, kiddo!Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

For more information on the original Fat Quarter Flying Geese pattern, check it out here.

 




Quilt Pattern Round-Up by ReannaLily Designs

Free Quilt Patterns | Quilt Tutorials | How to Quilt | ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge

Don’t wait ’til Christmas to dive into those holiday quilt gifts!

Here’s a collection of easy quilt projects to sew while you are relaxing this summer. No need to rush through them in November and hope your longarm quilter has time to finish by Dec 24th. Start stitching on these babies now.

Each of the patterns featured here are free tutorials offered by ReannaLily Designs.

No-Waste Flying Geese featuring Layer Cakes

This quilt makes up quite quickly using 10″ precut squares (Layer Cakes) or you can use yardage. Both types of fabric requirements are included in the free quilt tutorial.

Giant Flying Geese Using Layer Cakes | Quilting Pattern | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Kaffe Fassett

Huge Plus and Cross Quilt

The X and Plus block is a popular, easy block to make. For my spin on this classic design, I enlarged the block and share how to “assembly-line” piece each block. You’ll be surprised at how quickly you can create a large quilt top.

X and + Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide

Patriotic Wonky Star Quilt Tutorial

Skip the ruler and the measuring! This wonky star quilt is shown in Red, White and Blue, but would look fantastic in any color combination. Make it with assorted fat quarters for a scrap-quilt look. This is also an excellent design to use up your fabric stash as the blocks required are only 5″ square.

Patriotic Wonky Star Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Giant Fat Quarter Flying Geese

Use 28 Fat Quarters to stitch large traditional Flying Geese blocks. Only 55 blocks are needed to make this Queen Size design.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Plus Baby Quilt

The Plus Baby quilt includes a printable worksheet for you to use to plan your design. No more running back and forth to the design wall/kitchen table to see what colors come next, simply follow the cutting chart, pin fabrics to the worksheet, and sew. This is a great fat quarter project!

Plus Quilt | ReannaLily Designs

Disappearing 9-Patch Quilt featuring Layer Cakes

Disappearing 9-Patch blocks are fun! What would make them better? Make them BIGGER! Yep, this quilt is made using 10″ precut squares and background yardage. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this particular tutorial to see the quilt in a couple different color combinations.

Disappearing 9-Patch Quilt | Longarm Quilting | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Batik Braid Quilt Tutorial

This quilt tutorial is easily the most popular one on ReannaLily Designs website. Use 2-1/2″ precut strips (Jelly Roll) to create this braided top.

Batik Braid Quilt Tutorial by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Design

Finishing

Once you’ve finished your quilt top, drop me a note so we can get your design in the longarm quilting queue and finished! I look forward to seeing your projects.

Quilted Gift Box

If you are on social media, tag your ReannaLily Designs quilts with #reannalilydesigns.




Giant Fat Quarter Flying Geese – Queen Size

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The Fat Quarter Flying Geese free quilt pattern/tutorial makes a queen size quilt using fat quarters. These traditional Flying Geese block units are HUGE! Get your fat quarter pieces out and pull 28 coordinating pieces. No more hoarding fat quarters with this easy, big ole’ design.

Fabrics Used in this Quilt

  • 24-piece fat quarter bundle (Garnet, by Nancy Zieman)
  • Plus 4 additional coordinating fat quarters
  • 1 yard of brown for the 4″ border
  • Additional fabric for the binding

Using the free pattern, I stitched 55 HUGE geese each measuring 16-1/2″ x 8-1/2″.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Note: If you happen to have a layer cake (10″ precut square pieces) rather than a fat quarter bundle, use this Giant Flying Geese with Layer Cakes pattern instead.

Sew the Quilt

The quilt is arranged in five columns, each with 11 rectangular blocks. The easiest way to create the top:

 

  • Start with 56 geese.
  • Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all.
  • Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column.
  • Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs.
  • Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column.
  • Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column.
  • Add a border if you like.

Yes, it is pretty random. I like that look.  But, by sewing the geese in pairs first, you do have the option of making a traditional style quilt where the geese (large triangle) points all “fly” in one direction.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

The quilt is framed in a 4″ brown border. I think it helps with the randomness.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

The design is quilted focusing the geese (larger) and sky (smaller) triangles separately.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Without the borders, the quilt measures approximately 80″ x 88″. Turns out, that is really big for snapping a photo in the back yard.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collectionHere it is on the fence…. oops- with wind. I’m sure there’s an actual “flying geese” joke here somewhere….

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Ah, wait. Here we go. I love how this turned out and wouldn’t ya know, I have more fat quarters to create another quilt.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs