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Writing a Book- Free-Motion Framework

Writing a Book- Free-Motion Framework

on Apr 17, 2018 in Blog, book, Featured, quilting | 2 comments

Early last year I shared a blog post vaguely mentioning my “Secret Quilting Project.” I’m happy to report I can finally elaborate on the details and explain how the logistics of authoring Free-Motion Framework went down. From timeline to work-load, here’s how it happened: In late 2016, I pitched a concept to C&T Publishing to feature 10 linear designs created to help you improve your machine quilting skills while accidentally producing a wholecloth quilt.  The concept was well received. I have to say myself, I hadn’t seen anything like it in the quilting community, either. That was great news! The publishing team and acquisitions folks chatted with me about how broad the scope would be and how much it would take to write the book. When I say “how much,” I don’t mean money; I mean time.  We discussed release-dates and other planning events way back in the fall of 2016. My book, Free-Motion Framework, was in the incubator a bit longer than a usual book for two main reasons: My sweet husband deployed for half of 2017, and I knew I wouldn’t be able to be a quilt-author-maniac while holding down the fort. The book coordinates the efforts of generous sponsors and 17 different contributing quilters. That is a TON of quilters. Spreadsheets galore! Once that was ironed out, I was emailing my dream-team of quilters by November. Just like hosting a party, you throw out invitations and hope everyone can attend, but realistically some folks have other commitments and a few may have to cancel their RSVP’s.  Most quilters stitched two different design projects in the book. Others volunteered to quilt three. I think I personally quilted 10 or 11. I’d have to go back and re-count. Next up, reaching out to the amazing sponsors who provided products to help make this book a reality. Lots of emailing and lots of spreadsheets.  Thank you to these generous folks: Fairfield Batting Clover USA HandiQuilter Hab And Dash (previously Bobbin Central/Fil Tec) And don’t forget the amazing fabric sponsors. This book was much trickier for me to plan fabric than my previous books. In previous books, I’d design a quilt, and say “Hum, this quilt pattern needs 2 yards of...

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Introducing Free-Motion Framework by Jen Eskridge

Introducing Free-Motion Framework by Jen Eskridge

on Apr 13, 2018 in Blog, Featured, FMFWQ, quilting | 0 comments

Free-Motion Framework is finally here!!! Free-Motion Framework is my newest book releasing with C & T Publishing. I’m beyond excited to share the concept and details with you over the coming weeks. In a nutshell, the book is 10 linear designs created to help you improve your machine quilting skills while accidentally producing a wholecloth quilt. Sounds a bit crazy, right? I started out wanting to create a wholecloth quilt but soon realized there’s no way I wanted to plan a wholecloth quilt. It became clear that if I simply had a few guidelines marked, I could quilt whatever I felt comfortable-enough stitching and, as long as I worked symmetrically, I’d probably turn out a really neat quilt. The design is a bonus pattern in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package. Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog. C & T  Publishing’s blog has a more in-depth look at the book, with excerpts from the title in their new blog post. To create this book, I worked with the aforementioned 10 linear designs, which I created in Adobe Illustrator. I then reached out to other machine quilters to assemble a team of 17 total quilters to create the 41 quilts featured in the book. Yes, FORTY-ONE quilts (not including any digital mock-ups). Each design is presented in it’s full square composition, and a quadrant of the design is presented. Then each linear design is stitched four times, by four different quilters using as many or as few lines as they’d like to fill in shapes with machine quilting designs which they feel comfortable stitching. For this reason, this skill builder is great for ALL levels of machine quilters. Take a look at these interpretations of the Shark Attack design:       This book will be a fantastic resource for machine quilting textures, as created by the army of quilting contributors, as well as a good go-to for low-stress machine quilting practice ideas. I hope you’ll add it to your library. There will be more details on this book in the coming weeks. I will share more sneak-peeks at the designs, the concept, the writing process, and more. For now,...

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Nested 9-Patch Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

Nested 9-Patch Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

on Mar 24, 2018 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 1 comment

  Custom Quilted Nested 9-Patch Pattern In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Nested 9-Patch Quilts for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt three new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals collection for Penny Rose Fabrics, a division of Riley Blake Designs. The first quilt, Shiplap Ahoy was the focus in January, and Spinning 4-Patch last month. Today, the third pattern, Nested 9-Patch is showcased. The quilt is constructed using simple strip-pieced sewing techniques which are on the NZP blog today. All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com. Planning to Quilt Each block has exactly the same seam lines. The color palette is soft so picking a quilting thread color wasn’t too tricky. I opted for Bone color glide 40wt thread. Before I started quilting, though, I really needed a design! The beautiful 9-patch blocks are set on point, which means to quilt within each block will be wider than my longarm’s throat space. That means I will need to come up with a design where I can stitch the top half of the block, advance the quilt, then stitch the lower half of each block. I decided to approach this quilt with Lisa Calle’s Divide and Design method. My basic take-away from her book is to find points to connect within the block. Not necessarily seams or intersections, but rather points like “half way through this side” or “one inch passed the middle of this seam.” First,I stitched and echoed arches from corner to corner having the apex fall about 1″ past the middle of the inner seam. I added hooked feathers under the arch shape. Next, I stitched another diamond shape in the center of the 9-patch. I added wishbone stitches in each new corner created. Here’s a top view. You can really see the arch and diamond shape...

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Shiplap Ahoy Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

Shiplap Ahoy Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

on Jan 28, 2018 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 2 comments

Custom Quilted Shiplap Ahoy Quilts Pattern In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Shiplap Ahoy Quilts for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals collection for Penny Rose Fabrics, a division of Riley Blake Designs. NZP is releasing three patterns for this fabric collection. The first one, featured today, is Shiplap Ahoy. Nancy designed, edited, and tweaked this pattern early last year. It is truly amazing how far in advance the entire quilting community works. The quilt is offered in two different color palettes. Both full-size quilt photos are on the NZP blog today. Taking two reasonably identical quilts and custom quilt them differently was tricky. All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com. Blue and White Quilt Each block in the quilt features three or four rows with an assorted number of three-dimensional triangles. I opted to quilt straight lines around the triangle shape to highlight the angles. I also quilted a Fluer De Lis in the triangles themselves. Stretched-out wishbone shapes are quilted into the sashing. The back of each of the quilts is a 108″ wide mottled white by Riley Blake Fabrics. You can really see the quilting on the backs. Multi-Color Quilt The multi-color version of this quilt has each of the five shiplap print colors from the Farmhouse Florals collection used as backgrounds for the blocks. I switched up the quilting design in this multi-color quilt to stitch wishbones in the block. The Bone color glide 40wt thread shows up differently on each background color. Again, the white backing fabric shows off all the quilting designs. Notice, I outlined the triangles, and they do not have a motif added within the shape. Fabric and Pattern Give Away Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC is giving away a fat quarter bundle and pattern...

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Longarm Quilting Edge-to-Edge Designs

Longarm Quilting Edge-to-Edge Designs

on Dec 14, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 0 comments

Longarm Quilting Edge-to-Edge Designs The blog has been quiet for a month as I’ve longarm machine quilted on a collection on customer quilts. I’m happy to share a quick slide show with you this morning. Everything featured here is considered an Edge-To-Edge design. What does that mean? Simply, for me to finish quilting your quilt I can travel from one edge to the other using one design motif without having to stop and change designs with shapes or use a ruler to outline patchwork designs. Having said that, this is how I consider Edge-To-Edge design at my longarm company, ReannaLily Quilts. Your longarm quilter may have a different definition. Above: The first photo has rows and rows of wild “spineless” feathers stitched in Wisteria Glide Thread on a rail fence quilt pattern design stitch in batik fabrics, similar to these fabrics at Craftsy. Christmas Tree Banner   The back is where you can really see the almost Edge-to-Edge design. For this quilt, I did a combination of quick Edge-to-Edge styles, but I did switch up the motif within each shape. I didn’t use rulers on the project, though. The pattern she used is called Tall Trim the Tree, I believe. Meandering Hearts The quilted gift is for her daughter and has hearts stitched into the meandering design to showcase the hearts in the fabric prints. Tessellating Fish My customer suggested a traditional clamshell design for his quilt. As he envisioned, the clams look like fish scales on his Tessellating Fish quilt.  Cool effect, right? City Skyline A panel with a border makes a very fast quilt design. My customer started with a panel similar to this one: City-scape by Hoffman, and framed it nicely. The quilted design did feature ruler work, but I consider it more of an edge-to-edge in this case since I didn’t outline any patches. To quilt this design, I stitched random straight (vertical-to-the-city) lines and followed the angles of the buildings. Lava Thread! Next is a quilt created by a grandmother and grand-daughter. Fun, right? The only thing that would make this large-scale pinwheel quilt more fun is a triangle-meander in bright ORANGE Lava thread! Patchwork Stocking And to take a quick break from quilting, I...

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Disappearing 9-Patch With Layer Cakes BABY QUILTS

Disappearing 9-Patch With Layer Cakes BABY QUILTS

on Nov 9, 2017 in Blog, fabric stash, Featured, quilt, quilting, tutorial | 4 comments

Disappearing 9-Patch is quite popular. My blog tutorial for this quilt style made with 10″ precut squares, Layer Cakes, is one of my most popular. Readers and quilt class students often ask how to create the Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes in a smaller size. Well, I have great news! This tutorial will show you how to create TWO small quilts from one precut fabric bundle and a small bit of yardage. Don’t you love that bright layer cake? Fabric designer, Patty Young of Mod Kid Boutique, asked a few pattern designer/bloggers to take her beautiful new collection for Riley Blake for a test drive. I’m thrilled to showcase her line Flit and Bloom in this tutorial. Skill Level: Super Easy Beginner Finished Size: Two Quilts approx 64″ x 64″ Supplies: 1 Layer Cake* Flit and Bloom by Patty Young is featured in this tutorial. 2 1/3 y white polka dot yardage (Bloom Scalloped Dot) 2/3 y pink fabric, border of quilt one 2/3 y grey fabric, border of quilt two 1/2 y binding for EACH quilt *Layer Cake is a precut 10″ x 10″ square fabric bundle with at least 40 pieces. 40 pieces are used in this tutorial. The term “layer cake” is a trademark of Moda Fabrics. Cut Quilt Pieces: 32 total white squares From the yardage, cut 8 strips at 10″ wide From the 8 strips, cut 4 squares 10″ x 10″ each TIP: Using a large cutting mat, stack sets of strips to make faster cuts. Construction: Remove two 10″ squares from the precut pack. In this case, I removed the Bloom Scalloped Dot, since it is going to be used elsewhere in the quilt design. These two will not be used. Also count out eight white squares. Set these aside. You will use them. Make eight basic, although GIANT 9-patch blocks using four white squares and five prints. Stitch using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Grab a Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide to make sure your 1/4″ seam is always accurate. To assemble the quilt quickly, I used a serger. Here’s why: You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine. You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever. The...

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Divide and Design: Planned Machine Quilting Designs

Divide and Design: Planned Machine Quilting Designs

on Oct 3, 2017 in Blog, quilting | 6 comments

The look of planned quilting designs is amazing. I love how they compliment the quilt and bring out a whole secondary design around the quilt block. In fact, I love it so much I grabbed the Divide and Design book by Lisa Calle. Her work is stunning (#fangirl), and she breaks down the method to design quilt motifs in her book. I’ve basically been putting off trying the technique until I had the perfect block-based quilt ready to go. Well, it occurred to me that may never happen. Lisa’s book outlines how to choose points to divide your block/space. Starting with that notion, I should be able to try her method on anything, right? Side story: This teal baby quilt has been in the UFO pile for nine years. Yes, I really just wrote NINE YEARS. I know because I won the fabric from Karen Combs’ booth at my first-ever quilt market in Fall of 2008. The fat quarter bundle was sponsored by Blank Textiles. Yes, NINE years ago. Now seems like as good a time as any to get this guy quilted up. I remembered making the quilt square. (cough cough) I based my divide-points on the fact that I must have 12″ blocks in this design. Unfortunately, I didn’t follow the directions as closely as I should have. Lisa mentions tracing paper and black & white copies and other things to be really successful with this technique. Well….  I said “Ok, dots. I’m gonna do this right now!” I was really excited to try the technique! After I loaded the quilt and was about 2/3rds the way finished with the longarm machine quilting, I noticed that my quilt was in fact a rectangle. Dangit. But, this revelation is ok. This is a practice piece, remember? No problemo. This quilt also did not have defined 12″ quilt blocks as I had remembered. Turns out, nine years is a long time to remember details. Good gravy. See along the top edge and bottom edge in the picture above? There are three 1/2 circle shapes, except the bottom edge’s circles are 3″ longer and look much more like pope hats. Failing memory aside, I think my first go at Divide...

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Greater San Antonio Quilt Show – Winner!

Greater San Antonio Quilt Show – Winner!

on Sep 28, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 8 comments

The Greater San Antonio Quilt Show was this past weekend, Sept 22nd & 23rd. I entered two quilts, and it turned out really well! I was floored. Both quilts are designed and quilted by yours truly. Each quilt has a previously authored blog posts when they were created. I’ll link them for you. Platinum Garden, whole cloth quilt, made with inexpensive satin and polyester components, placed 2nd in its show category, which was “Other/Miscellaneous.” Sorry for the blur; I was excited to snap the picture. My big ole bed-size Scrappy Circles quilt placed Honorable Mention in the “Scrap Quilt” show category. See the little red and pink embroidered boots pinned to each quilt? The quilters takes those off to wear them around the show. Pretty clever, even if I learned about them in the last 1-1/2 hour of the show. Holy smokes! I’m definitely going to try to do that again. I should start planning the next quilt/s now. Thank you for indulging me. The blog is a place to share patterns, quilting ideas, and general design ideas, but I also like to catalog my work & achievements here,...

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Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes

Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes

on Sep 20, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting, tutorial | 9 comments

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern is a pretty popular free tutorial here on my blog. I decided to create another quilt using the same pattern, but mixing up the background and foreground fabric placement. I’m calling this one the Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch. I’ll show you how easy it is to make this design appear completely different. Check this out! This is the exact same quilt pattern: Scroll up. Seriously, the two above quilts look completely different! Constructing the Quilt In both quilts, I cut my own pile of 10″ fabric squares. These precuts are affectionately known as a Layer Cake, though I believe Moda Fabrics does have the trademark on the actual name. I’ll show you how the inverted design works. In the original pattern the red/blue (foreground) colors were placed in the corners and center. For the alternate version, the foreground colors are placed to make a “plus.” You can see in the photos below, I’ve already done the slashing step. If you are diggin the military uniform in this quilt, you may love the Deploy that Fabric book. It features 23 different patterns to use military uniforms. In the book, there’s a guide as to how to break down a uniform to yield flat workable pieces which will incorporate into your next project or pattern. (***Note: This 9-Patch Quilt is NOT in the book. It is a free tutorial from ReannaLily Designs.) Ok, back to the quilt, following the original Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern, I simply rotated the upper right and lower left blocks. You’ll notice two little squares meet at the center, that is how you can tell the block layouts are identical. From here, I arranged the HUGE quarter blocks per the original diagram. To actually assemble the quilt I used a serger. As I’ve mentioned before: You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine. You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever. The seams are wrapped neatly together making them easy to press. This quilt doesn’t require pins or detailed piece-work. Quilting the Patriotic Quilt For many of the red, white, and blue quilts, I like to quilt them quickly featuring a meandering star design....

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Sew With Scraps

Sew With Scraps

on Sep 18, 2017 in Blog, fabric stash, quilt, quilting | 1 comment

September is National Sewing Month! You don’t have to tell me twice. Every month is National Sewing Month at my house. Today, I have the honor of sharing an article I authored for FaveQuilts.com and AllFreeSewing.com. I make quite a few quilts from fabric scraps. “Every time I purchase a fantastic piece of fabric, I want to use it in at least two quilts. For some reason that seems to justify the purchase, in my mind. Once I shifted to that mindset, I started trying to use all my fabrics in at least two quilts. This meant saving and storing fabric scraps and finding useful quilt ideas to incorporate scraps.” Read the article here. In the article I’ll cover tips and tricks that I use to sort scraps and plan projects. Take your stash from a blurry mess, here:   To an organized, tidy, and useable collection of fabrics. Read the article here. Learn how to quickly decided which scraps are suitable for your next project by working with templates. In the scrap quilting article, see how easy it is to audition fabrics with homemade paper templates. The scrap quilting article will also tackle design concepts to create interesting quilts. Looking at every single fabric in your scrap collection may be overwhelming, especially if you associate that-piece-of-fabric-with-this-one-planned/finished-quilt. Break out of that mindset to use color and value techniques to make your next project. Read the article here. Dive into your fabric scraps and make your next quilt! The results will be fantastic. The article also features links to popular scrap-quilting projects hosted here at ReannaLily...

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Celebrate National Sew A Jelly Roll Day

Celebrate National Sew A Jelly Roll Day

on Sep 16, 2017 in Blog, Featured, quilt, quilting, tutorial | 0 comments

What is a jelly roll? It goes by many names, but the trademarked name, Jelly Roll, is by Moda fabrics is a 40-42 piece fabric bundle of 2-1/2″ strips of fabric. The fabric is cut “straight off the bolt” so each piece is as wide as the width of fabric, 42″-44″. Pick up your own Jelly Roll in a variety of different colors and styles, here. There are many tutorials featuring the precut pieces and today I wanted to share with you a few things created here in the studio over the years. Celebrate National Sew a Jelly Roll Day with these quilt ideas. Batik Braid Quilt This is by-far the most popular tutorial on my blog, to date. It may be one of the older how-to’s posted, but it is still a great one. See how easy it is to create a braided look with your fabric using this Batik Braid tutorial. The Infamous 1600 Quilt This is the first quilt style that had me busting open my purchased jelly roll fabrics. It is a simple pattern and free tutorial (from the internet, not from me) where you stitch the short ends of the 2-1/2″ cut pieces together to form a strip, roughly 1600″ long. Yes, 1600″. From there you fold the strip, sew a seam, fold again, sew a seam, fold again, etc. You’ll see what I mean when you watch the Jelly Roll Race on this sewing tutorial.Adding Military Fabric to 1600″ Quilts The Jelly Roll Race or 1600″ quilt (linked above) is addicting. I did notice, though, that I could incorporate my own fabrics to create a more interesting look when blended with precut 2-1/2″ strips. I ended up making quilts and adding fabrics for each branch of the service, for a special project. I had help on this big collection. Thanks to my weekend sewing team! Mixing military uniform fabrics and bright quilter’s cottons is the foundation for my book, Deploy That Fabric. Check it out. Cut Your Own Roll Once I started cutting and adding in military uniforms, I realized, I could easily cut my own jelly roll. Lord knows, I have a small bit of fabric to work with. I’m guessing you...

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Vintage Hand-Embroidered Quilt

Vintage Hand-Embroidered Quilt

on Jul 8, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting | 4 comments

One of my most recent longarm quilting customers brought a hand-embroidered large quilt. You have to see the gorgeous work! My customer’s mother had stitched 30 identical blocks exquisitely. Each block was a pre-printed panel. I don’t have much experience with embroidery panels, but maybe you’ll recognize it. It was a challenge for me, as I’ve never quilted this style. After asking my longarm quilter friends/mentors, we opted to treat the design as if it were an applique project. I was NERVOUS! The first pass turned out ok, which eased my mind. I decided to add free-motion feathers around the hand-embroidered elements. Feather’s within the main heart were created on a second pass. The feathers weave around the design, and every-so-often, I’ve added a swirl to keep things fluid and interesting. The design isn’t symmetrical and neither is the quilting. The piece has plenty of movement. Although my customer’s mother isn’t here to see the finished quilt, I do hope the family will cherish it. It was absolutely amazing and very outside my...

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