Disappearing 9-Patch With Layer Cakes BABY QUILTS

Disappearing 9-Patch is quite popular. My blog tutorial for this quilt style made with 10″ precut squares, Layer Cakes, is one of my most popular. Readers and quilt class students often ask how to create the Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes in a smaller size. Well, I have great news! This tutorial will show you how to create TWO small quilts from one precut fabric bundle and a small bit of yardage. Don’t you love that bright layer cake?

Fabric designer, Patty Young of Mod Kid Boutique, asked a few pattern designer/bloggers to take her beautiful new collection for Riley Blake for a test drive. I’m thrilled to showcase her line Flit and Bloom in this tutorial.

Skill Level:

Super Easy Beginner

Finished Size:

Two Quilts approx 64″ x 64″

Supplies:

1 Layer Cake* Flit and Bloom by Patty Young is featured in this tutorial.

2 1/3 y white polka dot yardage (Bloom Scalloped Dot)

2/3 y pink fabric, border of quilt one

2/3 y grey fabric, border of quilt two

1/2 y binding for EACH quilt

*Layer Cake is a precut 10″ x 10″ square fabric bundle with at least 40 pieces. 40 pieces are used in this tutorial. The term “layer cake” is a trademark of Moda Fabrics.

Cut Quilt Pieces:

32 total white squares
From the yardage, cut 8 strips at 10″ wide


From the 8 strips, cut 4 squares 10″ x 10″ each

TIP: Using a large cutting mat, stack sets of strips to make faster cuts.

Construction:

Remove two 10″ squares from the precut pack. In this case, I removed the Bloom Scalloped Dot, since it is going to be used elsewhere in the quilt design. These two will not be used. Also count out eight white squares. Set these aside. You will use them.

Make eight basic, although GIANT 9-patch blocks using four white squares and five prints. Stitch using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Grab a Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide to make sure your 1/4″ seam is always accurate.

To assemble the quilt quickly, I used a serger. Here’s why:

  • You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine.
  • You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever.
  • The seams are wrapped neatly together making them easy to press.
  • This quilt doesn’t require pins or detailed piece-work.

Chain-piece 24 pairs of print and white fabrics. Grab them at random. No need to plan colors at this stage of the game.

Cut the pairs apart with scissors.

At this point, you will have 16 unstitched prints. And, don’t forget the 8 white squares, which you set aside earlier.

Sew a print OR white to each of the 24 pairs. Keep the alternating pattern. Print-White-Print OR White-Print-White.

Now, create a basic 9-patch block using these three-piece units.

Make eight total huge blocks.

Slice each 9-patch block into perfect quarters. Honestly, this is the hardest step because you’ll want to make sure you cut the pieces exactly in half, and you’ll need a large space to rotary cut them.

Sliced 9 Patch

Start by folding the large block in half, making sure the vertical seam lines lay on each other. You’ll be able to feel a little ridge where the seam is underneath what you can see.

Using a large ruler, line up one vertical seam line with the 4-3/4″ mark. Cut.

Open, turn and layer the halves, matching seam lines again to make the second cut.

Using a large ruler, line up one vertical seam line with the 4-3/4″ mark. Cut.

Wow. These are BIG quarter pieces.

This tutorial makes TWO quilts. Each quilt will use 16 quarter-squares laid out in a 4 x 4 grid. Every quarter will be used.

Start by sewing pairs of quarters in the exact same arrangement. See the small square in the northwest corner of block one and southwest corner of block two? Stay consistent when sewing all pairs in this fashion.

Once the pairs are stitched, join two together to form a four piece row. Add them to a design wall, large table, or floor to arrange the colors and focus fabrics. Each quilt will only have four rows, and alternating rows will be flipped 180 degrees (from the image shown above). This will make sense as you lay it out.

Quilt 1:

Add the third row.

Add the last row.

Quilt 2

Cut Border and Binding Pieces

From each of the 2/3 yard grey and pink fabrics, cut six 4-1/2″ x width of fabric strips.


From each of the 1/2 yard binding fabrics, cut six 2-1/2″ x width of fabric strips.

Add Borders

  • Each quilt should be approximately 56″ square right now.
  • Sew two sets of border strips together at the short ends.
  • Apply to the right and left sides of the quilt.
  • Trim excess
  • Sew excess to remaining two border strips.
  • Add each of those to the top and bottom of the quilt.

Quilt

Flit and Bloom- Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes Baby Quilts by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Flit and Bloom- Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes Baby Quilts by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Each of these tops were finished with different quilting designs. The quilt with grey borders got a special treatment with wishbones the border, teardrops in the corners, and a swirl edge-to-edge (e2e) design.

The quilt with pink borders has only a swirled flower edge-to-edge (e2e) over the entire quilt. There was no special border design treatment.

Binding

Use your favorite binding method to apply continuous binding to each quilt.

Thank you so much for browsing and stitching this tutorial!

Huge thanks to Patty Young and Riley Blake Fabrics for having me on the Flit and Bloom fabric tour. Check out other stops on the tour here:

Flit and Bloom- Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes Baby Quilts by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

———————————————————————————-
Can I quilt for you? Check out my work & hire me at Reannalilyquilts.com

This post contains affiliate links.



Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern is a pretty popular free tutorial here on my blog. I decided to create another quilt using the same pattern, but mixing up the background and foreground fabric placement. I’m calling this one the Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch. I’ll show you how easy it is to make this design appear completely different.

Check this out! This is the exact same quilt pattern:

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Quilt Pattern

Scroll up. Seriously, the two above quilts look completely different!

Constructing the Quilt

In both quilts, I cut my own pile of 10″ fabric squares. These precuts are affectionately known as a Layer Cake, though I believe Moda Fabrics does have the trademark on the actual name. I’ll show you how the inverted design works. In the original pattern the red/blue (foreground) colors were placed in the corners and center.

For the alternate version, the foreground colors are placed to make a “plus.” You can see in the photos below, I’ve already done the slashing step.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts
Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

If you are diggin the military uniform in this quilt, you may love the Deploy that Fabric book. It features 23 different patterns to use military uniforms. In the book, there’s a guide as to how to break down a uniform to yield flat workable pieces which will incorporate into your next project or pattern. (***Note: This 9-Patch Quilt is NOT in the book. It is a free tutorial from ReannaLily Designs.)

Ok, back to the quilt, following the original Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern, I simply rotated the upper right and lower left blocks. You’ll notice two little squares meet at the center, that is how you can tell the block layouts are identical.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

From here, I arranged the HUGE quarter blocks per the original diagram.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

To actually assemble the quilt I used a serger. As I’ve mentioned before:

  • You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine.
  • You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever.
  • The seams are wrapped neatly together making them easy to press.
  • This quilt doesn’t require pins or detailed piece-work.

Quilting the Patriotic Quilt

For many of the red, white, and blue quilts, I like to quilt them quickly featuring a meandering star design.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Instead of trying to fill the whole stitch-able space on my longarm, I really work edge-to-edge (e2e) in a reasonably straight line. Couple loops. Free-hand star. Couple more loops. Free-hand star. Once I reach the end, I simply head back the other direction. Everything is orderly and fast to finish.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Once the quilt is washed, this design is going to look fantastic. If you need a quilt finished by a longarm quilter, feel free to check out my longarm quilting services at ReannaLily Quilts.

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes | Military Uniform Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

This Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch (with Layer Cakes) is going to be given to a wonderfully hard-working high school teacher & veteran!

AND, this quilt is part of the Bloggers Quilt Festival! See all the festival quilts here.




Sew With Scraps

September is National Sewing Month! You don’t have to tell me twice. Every month is National Sewing Month at my house. Today, I have the honor of sharing an article I authored for FaveQuilts.com and AllFreeSewing.com.

I make quite a few quilts from fabric scraps. “Every time I purchase a fantastic piece of fabric, I want to use it in at least two quilts. For some reason that seems to justify the purchase, in my mind. Once I shifted to that mindset, I started trying to use all my fabrics in at least two quilts. This meant saving and storing fabric scraps and finding useful quilt ideas to incorporate scraps.

Read the article here.

In the article I’ll cover tips and tricks that I use to sort scraps and plan projects. Take your stash from a blurry mess, here:

How to Sort Quilting Fabric Scraps | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Deigns How to Sort Quilting Fabric Scraps | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Deigns

To an organized, tidy, and useable collection of fabrics.

How to Sort Quilting Fabric Scraps | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Deigns
How to Sort Quilting Fabric Scraps | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Deigns

Read the article here.

Learn how to quickly decided which scraps are suitable for your next project by working with templates. In the scrap quilting article, see how easy it is to audition fabrics with homemade paper templates.

Test Fabric Scrap Sizes | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The scrap quilting article will also tackle design concepts to create interesting quilts. Looking at every single fabric in your scrap collection may be overwhelming, especially if you associate that-piece-of-fabric-with-this-one-planned/finished-quilt. Break out of that mindset to use color and value techniques to make your next project.

Zig Zag Scrap Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Read the article here.

Dive into your fabric scraps and make your next quilt! The results will be fantastic. The article also features links to popular scrap-quilting projects hosted here at ReannaLily Designs.




Celebrate National Sew A Jelly Roll Day

What is a jelly roll? It goes by many names, but the trademarked name, Jelly Roll, is by Moda fabrics is a 40-42 piece fabric bundle of 2-1/2″ strips of fabric. The fabric is cut “straight off the bolt” so each piece is as wide as the width of fabric, 42″-44″. Pick up your own Jelly Roll in a variety of different colors and styles, here. There are many tutorials featuring the precut pieces and today I wanted to share with you a few things created here in the studio over the years. Celebrate National Sew a Jelly Roll Day with these quilt ideas.

Batik Braid Quilt

This is by-far the most popular tutorial on my blog, to date. It may be one of the older how-to’s posted, but it is still a great one. See how easy it is to create a braided look with your fabric using this Batik Braid tutorial.

Batik Braid Quilt Tutorial by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The Infamous 1600 Quilt

This is the first quilt style that had me busting open my purchased jelly roll fabrics. It is a simple pattern and free tutorial (from the internet, not from me) where you stitch the short ends of the 2-1/2″ cut pieces together to form a strip, roughly 1600″ long. Yes, 1600″. From there you fold the strip, sew a seam, fold again, sew a seam, fold again, etc. You’ll see what I mean when you watch the Jelly Roll Race on this sewing tutorial.Jelly Roll Race | 1600 Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily DesignsAdding Military Fabric to 1600″ Quilts

The Jelly Roll Race or 1600″ quilt (linked above) is addicting. I did notice, though, that I could incorporate my own fabrics to create a more interesting look when blended with precut 2-1/2″ strips. I ended up making quilts and adding fabrics for each branch of the service, for a special project. I had help on this big collection. Thanks to my weekend sewing team! Mixing military uniform fabrics and bright quilter’s cottons is the foundation for my book, Deploy That Fabric. Check it out.

Cut Your Own Roll

Once I started cutting and adding in military uniforms, I realized, I could easily cut my own jelly roll. Lord knows, I have a small bit of fabric to work with. I’m guessing you do, too. The next quilt in my project showcase features orange and green fabrics. The twist: These strips are 3″ wide to make for a bigger quilt. Neat trick, right? See more quilt pictures here.

This orange quilt turned out really well once I covered it in quilted feathers.

ReannaLily Quilts | Feathers | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Quilting Service

Ruffle Bag

With any leftover precut pieces, either from a jelly roll or from quilt binding, which most quilters cut to be 2-1/2″ x width of fabric, you can make this small ruffle bag. The ruffle is scrap pieces! And by the way, how fun is that? Saving all the binding strip scraps to later have your own wildly unique “jelly roll.”

Scrappy Dresden Wedge

Using the precut pieces to create strip-sets, you’ll be able to achieve a very scrappy look on your next giant Dresden wedge quilt. Learn how to lengthen the wedge template and create a nearly 36″ diameter scrappy Dresden.

Serger Strip Quilt

One thing I love about jelly roll quilts is that they largely start with straight-line-sewing. No points are matched; no intersections are pinned. For this reason, you can really jam-out the first few steps on a serger. Check out how easy it is to serge up strip-sets and make subcuts to create this dynamic quilt.

Scrappy Trip Around The World

My quilt guild hosted a “Scrappy Trip Along” quilting project following the pattern provided by Bonnie Hunter of Quiltville. I ended up making three quilts using that pattern, during that summer challenge. This Scrappy Trip Around the World was one of my favorites.

*This post contains affiliate links.




Blue Flying Geese: Queen-Size Quilt

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

It seems I’m currently obsessed with Giant Flying Geese. The newest queen-size quilt in the Giant Flying Geese collection is created from every blue shade in my own fabric stash.

Speaking of fabric stash:

  • Smaller scraps (bigger than 2″ and too small to properly fold to store) sorted by color in ziploc bags. The ziplocs are then stored in a plastic tub.
  • Larger scraps  (big enough to fold, but not a fat quarter OR a big piece that has a weird shape cut out of a portion of it) folded, sorted by color in a plastic tub.
  • Fat Quarters (only the square ones, not actual 1/4 yard cuts) sorted by color in two fabric bins in the cubbies.

Ok, so now that we’ve gone through the scraps it was time to cut!

  • 56 squares measuring 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″  NOTE: I created an 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″ square template from paper to lay over each scrap to determine if it was big enough. Huge time saver!
  • 14 squares measuring 17-1/4″  x 17-1/4″

Since this was scrappy, I knew I wanted scrappy binding. Each time I had a bit extra fabric, I’d cut off a 2-1/4″ x width to use later at the end of the project. I also stored all those in a ziploc bag because I didn’t want to lose them before the quilt was finished.

Using the No-Waste Flying Geese Method on this large scale, detailed on the original pattern post, I whipped up 56 flying geese blocks in a weekend.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Ok. that is going well. There’s a simple method to planning a quilt this larger without a design wall.

  • Start with 56 geese.
  • Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all.
  • Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column.
  • Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs.
  • Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column.
  • Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column.
  • Add a border if you like.

Ta’dah – super scrappy with no design wall or stress. THAT is how I can finish quilt tops in a weekend. I heart math. (sometimes)

Now to the machine quilting! Unlike the other quilts created in this style, I didn’t treat each triangle individually. Instead, I stitch swirls over the entire design.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Working from right to left, I was on a roll! That is, until I hit a bump. Not a real bump, but rather an adorable giant doggy speed-bump. Turns out this was the perfect spot to lay in the afternoon. In her defense, I did have a purple box fan blowing beside me.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

My quilting stance started to look like a yoga pose, as to not wake the helper-dog.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

The light in the longarm room, which some may call “The Formal Dining Room” (HA!), is perfect. The quilting pictures turn out so neat.
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

All aboard the binding train! Most everything I quilt is finished with machine-applied and machine-finished binding. There’s a large table in my sewing room to support the weight of the quilt, and I think that is the main reason that I actually enjoy the binding step.

I found the trusty ziploc of binding-size scraps and stitched them end-to-end. Remember, I was just cutting and cutting and cutting pieces to add to the bag? I wanted to make sure I had enough, but really, this seems excessive:

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

There is only one single thing I do not like about scrappy binding; and dangit, if it doesn’t happen more often than not:

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Seam right in the corner! DANGIT. DANGIT. Generally I just take the quilt out from under the machine, cut out the seam, and re-join the binding further up along the stitched side. Yes, the ever-popular seam ripper will be involved. Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

I wish this was a before picture (below), but alas, it is not. I had enough scrap binding left over to finish up a baby quilt. OOOOOPS!!!

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Ready to see the finished quilt photographed in glaring sunlight? Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

My assistant did another fantastic job holding the quilt. He’s not digging the glaring sunlight either. #gamer

Thanks, kiddo!Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using blue fabric scraps

For more information on the original Fat Quarter Flying Geese pattern, check it out here.

 




Vintage Hand-Embroidered Quilt

Hand Embroidered Quilt | Finished by ReannaLily Quilts | Jen Eskridge | Customer Quilt

One of my most recent longarm quilting customers brought a hand-embroidered large quilt. You have to see the gorgeous work!

Hand Embroidered Quilt | Finished by ReannaLily Quilts | Jen Eskridge | Customer Quilt

My customer’s mother had stitched 30 identical blocks exquisitely. Each block was a pre-printed panel. I don’t have much experience with embroidery panels, but maybe you’ll recognize it. It was a challenge for me, as I’ve never quilted this style. After asking my longarm quilter friends/mentors, we opted to treat the design as if it were an applique project.

Hand Embroidered Quilt | Finished by ReannaLily Quilts | Jen Eskridge | Customer Quilt

I was NERVOUS! The first pass turned out ok, which eased my mind. I decided to add free-motion feathers around the hand-embroidered elements. Feather’s within the main heart were created on a second pass. The feathers weave around the design, and every-so-often, I’ve added a swirl to keep things fluid and interesting.

Hand Embroidered Quilt | Finished by ReannaLily Quilts | Jen Eskridge | Customer Quilt

The design isn’t symmetrical and neither is the quilting. The piece has plenty of movement.

Hand Embroidered Quilt | Finished by ReannaLily Quilts | Jen Eskridge | Customer Quilt

Although my customer’s mother isn’t here to see the finished quilt, I do hope the family will cherish it. It was absolutely amazing and very outside my “box.”




Scrappy Circles Quilt – Finished

Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

This Scrappy Circles Quilt has been a long time in the making! Based on my blog, I made this quilt top back in December of 2014. I finally felt confident enough to quilt this big ‘ole thing.

Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Each scrappy circle block is cut using templates. The blocks measure 18″ square. HUGE. In fact, some of the background pieces were so large that I have bonus seams in them so they’d fit the template without me purchasing any fabrics. I love a good scrap quilt made entirely from fabric stash.

Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

I departed from my comfort zone a tad and quilted the whole thing in Orange Creamsicle Maxilock Variegated thread. I enjoy variegated thread, but I don’t generally like it when it goes from white to a much darker shade. This one turned out ok. Of course, all the quilting hiccups happened when I was in the darkest thread.

High Contrast Thread Meme | ReannaLily Designs

It was a bit windy when we were able to snap photos of the quilt. #keepingitreal

Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

And of course, the sweet dog wanted to help, too.
Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

I did manage to get a few shots of the actual quilting. Each scrappy ring had a design:

  • Center – Long Wishbones
  • Middle Rings – Tight Wishbones
  • Outer Ring – Straight-ish Lines
  • Light Background – Diagonal Spineless Feathers

Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

The feather quilting design is more like the Everything Bagel of quilted feathers. I have hooked feathers, curls, real feathers, cheat-y type feathers, and anything else I could think of at that time.
Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

The back is a beautiful 108″ wide piece from Joann’s. I pre-washed it to make sure it wouldn’t bleed; washing with a color-catcher. Surprise, the color-catcher was perfectly white at the end of the load. Fantastic! I’ll be buying this one again.

Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

All in all, I’m loving the Scrappy Circles Quilt. It measures 72″ x 90″.

That’s a wrap. Thank you, my super-tall, quilt-holding assistant!

Scrappy Circles Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts




Giant Fat Quarter Flying Geese – Queen Size

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The Fat Quarter Flying Geese free quilt pattern/tutorial makes a queen size quilt using fat quarters. These traditional Flying Geese block units are HUGE! Get your fat quarter pieces out and pull 28 coordinating pieces. No more hoarding fat quarters with this easy, big ole’ design.

Fabrics Used in this Quilt

  • 24-piece fat quarter bundle (Garnet, by Nancy Zieman)
  • Plus 4 additional coordinating fat quarters
  • 1 yard of brown for the 4″ border
  • Additional fabric for the binding

Using the free pattern, I stitched 55 HUGE geese each measuring 16-1/2″ x 8-1/2″.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Note: If you happen to have a layer cake (10″ precut square pieces) rather than a fat quarter bundle, use this Giant Flying Geese with Layer Cakes pattern instead.

Sew the Quilt

The quilt is arranged in five columns, each with 11 rectangular blocks. The easiest way to create the top:

 

  • Start with 56 geese.
  • Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all.
  • Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column.
  • Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs.
  • Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column.
  • Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column.
  • Add a border if you like.

Yes, it is pretty random. I like that look.  But, by sewing the geese in pairs first, you do have the option of making a traditional style quilt where the geese (large triangle) points all “fly” in one direction.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

The quilt is framed in a 4″ brown border. I think it helps with the randomness.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

The design is quilted focusing the geese (larger) and sky (smaller) triangles separately.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection
Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Without the borders, the quilt measures approximately 80″ x 88″. Turns out, that is really big for snapping a photo in the back yard.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collectionHere it is on the fence…. oops- with wind. I’m sure there’s an actual “flying geese” joke here somewhere….

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs - made using Nancy Zieman's Garnet collection

Ah, wait. Here we go. I love how this turned out and wouldn’t ya know, I have more fat quarters to create another quilt.

Fat Quarter Flying Geese Quilt | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs




Disappearing 9-Patch with Lily and Loom Craftsy

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

This fun Disappearing 9-Patch quilt is made using 10″ precut squares (aka LAYER CAKES)! The quilt features Lily & Loom, new fabric by Boundless, which is releasing on Craftsy. 

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

The layer cake features 42 precut 10″ squares. The whole pack is youthful and bright. Get your fabric bundle here.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

Using the Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes tutorial, I was able to make the quilt top in an afternoon. The pieces/units are HUGE.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

And of course, I chain pieced everything, even the binding pieces. I tend to make the binding first so I don’t accidentally use the fabric in the quilt.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

This quick cutting tool, The Cutting Gizmo, is amazing. I have mentioned it before. I received the cutter for Christmas and am not sure how I quilted for 20+ years without it.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen EskridgeLily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

Cut, cut, cut and the chain pieced units were read to stitch.

See how easily the quilt goes together on the sewing tutorial.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

I opted to stitch a quick all-over swirl design on my HandiQuilter Avante 18″.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

Lastly, I just needed to apply binding. I did that by machine, too, making this quilt incredibly fast to stitch. Volia! Finitio!

If you’d like to make this quilt for yourself, grab a quilt kit here.

Lily and Loom | Boundless Fabric by Craftsy | ReannaLily Designs | Disappearing 9-Patch | Jen Eskridge

This post contains affiliate links.




Platinum Garden: Satin Wholecloth Quilt

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I’m crazy for this platinum satin whole cloth quilt! It is named Platinum Garden and started out as a wild experiment. A 60″ x 60″ quilting adventure! What I wanted was one of those amazing silk wholecloth quilts with the puffy and fantastic wool battings. Upon further inspection – YIKES – silk is almost $30/yard and wool batting isn’t for the faint of heart. (I couldn’t commit at those prices.) Since this was to be a test, I went with polyester, “platinum” color satin charmeuse and high-loft polyester batting. To top it off, I actually used a bed sheet (50/50% poly cotton) from Walmart as the backing! Pretty crazy, right?

As you may know, I’m enjoying a quilting series of whole cloth quilts, like the one in this wholecloth post and this wholecloth post.  As described in those previous adventures, I start with a linear quadrant design like this one:

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Print the quadrant once, tape it together, and trace it onto the wholecloth four times, or simply print it four times. I opted to just print the full-size quadrant once. Note: This quadrant design is not available for free full-size download. If you’d like to download a quadrant and give it a try, please visit these two posts: wholecloth post and wholecloth post.

Since I was using slippery & shifty satin, I decided to use dressmaker’s carbon tracing papers to transfer the design to the quilt’s surface.

Of course, I started in right away on the quilting.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Some feathers here. Some lines there.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

A few wishbones in the corners.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Then I realized this quilt was WAY too big and to slippery to roll back and forth to work in a symmetrical quilting fashion. Instead, I decided to draw directly on my printed quadrant to serve as a road map for what I was going to quilt when I needed to replicate the top half of the quilt, on the bottom half. I pinned it above my quilt frame as a reference. (I’m going to have lots of holes to patch on that wall if we ever move!)

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

As I would stitch an area, I’d run over to the quadrant and doodle out what I just did. I don’t want you to think I actually, really planned something. Ha. You can see the cheap bed sheet backing in the photo below, too.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Wowsa. It is coming along. For some reason, those flower petals in the middle gave me fits thinking of how to fill them.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

When in doubt, add more feathers! That’s gonna be my new rule. You can really see the PINK Glide thread in this picture, above.

Like the other quilts I’ve made in this design series, each time the quilt comes off the frame there’s a whole “Holy Quilting, Batman! I cannot believe I made that!” moment. It really is a neat way to trick yourself. Simply isolate a shape in the design, quilt it, and make it symmetrical. Who knows what your quilt will look like in the end? Everyone loves surprises.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I thought the satin would be far too difficult to apply as a traditional quilt binding. My options were apply lightweight interfacing to it as you would in apparel sewing, OR simple add a facing to the whole quilt and skip the traditional binding all together. I went with the latter. Would you like to see some close-up shots of the quilting?

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily DesignsPlatinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

And a couple outdoorsy shots with overcast lighting.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Is it perfect? Nope.

Do I love it far more than I should? Absolutely!

The experiment is confirmed. That totally worked. Now, to start saving my pennies for the silk and wool.

 




Grumpy Cat Quilt

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Grumpy Cat Quilt

Yes, you read that right. It is a Grumpy Cat Quilt. The San Antonio Modern Quilt Guild has a Pop Culture Sewing Bee: everything from Pusheen to Zelda, from Comic-Con to Memes and more! I chose Grumpy Cat as my project for the December meeting.

I do not have a pattern for the Gato Gru??n, but here’s how I made him:

First, you’ll need an image. I did a google search for “Grumpy Cat Cartoon” thinking the colors and shapes would already be broken down into easy, usable areas. That worked.

  • Save the image
  • Using software, scale the image to the size you want. (I assume you could do this in MS Office/Word, but I used Illustrator.)
  • Print the image using the “tile large pages” or “poster” option. My finished piece is about 18″ x 24″.
  • Tape the image back together.

You might find it helpful to outline the shape edges with sharpie. I tried, but the sharpie I was using was on its way out.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I taped it to a window (to act as a light board) and traced the outlines of the shapes onto Heat’n Bond fusible web.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Label the pieces before you cut them out! If you are making a portrait or image using this method, be advised that the final image will be “flipped” from what you printed. (You can flip the image on the computer before you print, if it isn’t symmetrical – like letters or recognizable places.)

Cut out the wacky little heat’n bond shapes and fuse them to the wrong-side of your project fabrics.

Now arrange the shapes, using the original printed image as a guide.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I worked in little sections. If I had something in the wrong place, I wouldn’t screw up the whole project with one press.

  • Right-side of the Grumpy Cat face
  • Left-side of Grumpy Cat face
  • Nose/Mouth
  • Left ear
  • Right ear
  • Tail and body shadows
  • LAST- eyes. I was nervous about really messing those up. As Melissa Averinos says, the eyes are the most important part of the portrait.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Hey, are those cheese-y pigs in a blanket on my plate in the lower right corner (above)? Why, yes they are! You cannot have a sewing bee without food, of course.

Once everything is fused, it is time to think about quilting and think about the final use of the quilt. Sure, I probably should have thought about the end-use earlier, but you know… sometimes that doesn’t happen.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

For my project, I plan to wrap it around a canvas and hang it on a wall. For this reason, I didn’t have to be too meticulous with the quilting as it will never be washed.

I did use a grey thread to trace around the fused shapes with stitching lines.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Instead of trying to work with a thin piece of black or dark grey fabric to outline his Grumpy Cat body, I decided I’d add those lines with thread, too. I drew them out with water soluble pen, and I traced over these areas 4-6 times with free motion quilting lines.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

My last step will be to stretch the small quilt around canvas stretcher-bars. I’ll be using my staple gun and basic “upholstered headboard” techniques to get this little guy wrapped.

This just in!!! I found a 16″ x 20″ canvas at the thrift store and it worked perfectly for this project.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

And the fantasticly Grumpy Cat quilt is now greeting folks in my front entry. Merry Christmas to me.

Grumpy Cat Quilt | Pop Culture Sewing Bee | SAMQG | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

 

 




Mini Quilt Zip Top Bag

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-16Mini Quilt Transformed into Zip Top Bag

Are you addicted to internet mini quilt swaps? Are you running out of wall space? I have a cure for you.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-1

This above mini was part of a Heartbeat Table Runner pattern by Nancy Zieman.

Turn your mini quilt into a zippered bag with a couple easy steps. The best part: It doesn’t matter what size your mini quilt is!

Supplies

You’ll need a zipper roughly the same length or slightly longer than the short side of your mini quilt. Plastic, non-separating zippers work best.

If your zipper is shorter than your mini’s edge, you may want to sew zipper tabs to each end. Basically, you will be covering the zipper ends with fabric. Craftsy has a tutorial for zipper tab ends.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-2

Construction

My zipper is almost the exact size as my table runner. (It is the “wrong” kind of zipper. This one, from my stash, is a separating zip like you’d use in a jacket. I stitched a zigzag tack stitch over the teeth to keep the zipper from fully coming apart.)

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-3

Pin the right side of the zipper to the wrong side of the quilt at the binding. The zipper tape should extend past the binding a small amount.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-4

I pin parallel to the zipper tape to keep things straight.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-5

Start stitching right inside the side binding. Working from the wrong side, edge-stitch along the zipper tape. The stitching line should fall right on the edge of the binding, when looking at it from the front. The binding itself will create a sort of lip around the zipper. (below)

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-6

Unzip the zipper and apply to the opposite side. Pretend you are making a tube at this point, if that helps. Make sure the zipper’s right side is touching the quilt’s wrong side. See the “twist” on the lower right of the photo below?

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-7

The zipper is in place, and the mini quilt looks like a tube. I’m going to leave my zipper ends exposed and not covered with fabric tabs.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-8

At this point you have a few bag options:

Flat Pouch

If you like this flat pouch style, you can simply stitch the right and left sides of the bag. Do this by lining up the right and left bindings, and sew along the binding’s stitching line or in-the-ditch. If I opted for this method, I would simply cut off the excess zipper tape as the final step.miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-9

Standing Bag

Option two is the standing bag.

  • To make a standing bag, first close the zipper.
  • Flatten the bag with the zipper as one folded edge and the bag bottom as the other folded edge.
  • Stitch along the right and left seams either on the binding or in-the-ditch next to the binding.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-10

  • Next, turn the bag inside out.
  • Match the side seam with the bottom fold. Open the two bound edges flat.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-11

  • Pin a triangle shape where the side seam and bottom folds meet.
  • Sew across the triangle. This will create the width of the bag’s bottom. The size of the triangle will vary related to the size of your mini. For my bag, my triangles were about 1-1/2″ from seam line to point.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-12

  • Cut the excess triangle fabric 1/4″ past the stitching line.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-13

  • Use a zigzag stitch or serger to finish this interior cut edge. Sew slowly; there’s a great deal of bulk at the side seam line.

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-14

  • Repeat the triangle treatment for both lower corners of the bag.
  • Turn the bag right-side out.
  • This is how the lower corner should look:

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-15

  • And a peek inside:

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-17

Yep. My mini quilt turned zip top bag is ready to go!

miniquilt-zipbag-jeneskridge-16