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Blue Flying Geese: Queen-Size Quilt

Blue Flying Geese: Queen-Size Quilt

on Jul 9, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, tutorial | 1 comment

It seems I’m currently obsessed with Giant Flying Geese. The newest queen-size quilt in the Giant Flying Geese collection is created from every blue shade in my own fabric stash. Speaking of fabric stash: Smaller scraps (bigger than 2″ and too small to properly fold to store) sorted by color in ziploc bags. The ziplocs are then stored in a plastic tub. Larger scraps  (big enough to fold, but not a fat quarter OR a big piece that has a weird shape cut out of a portion of it) folded, sorted by color in a plastic tub. Fat Quarters (only the square ones, not actual 1/4 yard cuts) sorted by color in two fabric bins in the cubbies. Ok, so now that we’ve gone through the scraps it was time to cut! 56 squares measuring 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″  NOTE: I created an 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″ square template from paper to lay over each scrap to determine if it was big enough. Huge time saver! 14 squares measuring 17-1/4″  x 17-1/4″ Since this was scrappy, I knew I wanted scrappy binding. Each time I had a bit extra fabric, I’d cut off a 2-1/4″ x width to use later at the end of the project. I also stored all those in a ziploc bag because I didn’t want to lose them before the quilt was finished. Using the No-Waste Flying Geese Method on this large scale, detailed on the original pattern post, I whipped up 56 flying geese blocks in a weekend. Ok. that is going well. There’s a simple method to planning a quilt this larger without a design wall. Start with 56 geese. Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all. Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column. Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs. Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column. Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column. Add a border if you like. Ta’dah – super scrappy with no design wall or stress. THAT is how I can finish quilt tops in a...

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Vintage Hand-Embroidered Quilt

Vintage Hand-Embroidered Quilt

on Jul 8, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting | 4 comments

One of my most recent longarm quilting customers brought a hand-embroidered large quilt. You have to see the gorgeous work! My customer’s mother had stitched 30 identical blocks exquisitely. Each block was a pre-printed panel. I don’t have much experience with embroidery panels, but maybe you’ll recognize it. It was a challenge for me, as I’ve never quilted this style. After asking my longarm quilter friends/mentors, we opted to treat the design as if it were an applique project. I was NERVOUS! The first pass turned out ok, which eased my mind. I decided to add free-motion feathers around the hand-embroidered elements. Feather’s within the main heart were created on a second pass. The feathers weave around the design, and every-so-often, I’ve added a swirl to keep things fluid and interesting. The design isn’t symmetrical and neither is the quilting. The piece has plenty of movement. Although my customer’s mother isn’t here to see the finished quilt, I do hope the family will cherish it. It was absolutely amazing and very outside my “box.” Tell a...

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Scrappy Circles Quilt – Finished

Scrappy Circles Quilt – Finished

on Jun 14, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting | 2 comments

This Scrappy Circles Quilt has been a long time in the making! Based on my blog, I made this quilt top back in December of 2014. I finally felt confident enough to quilt this big ‘ole thing. Each scrappy circle block is cut using templates. The blocks measure 18″ square. HUGE. In fact, some of the background pieces were so large that I have bonus seams in them so they’d fit the template without me purchasing any fabrics. I love a good scrap quilt made entirely from fabric stash. I departed from my comfort zone a tad and quilted the whole thing in Orange Creamsicle Maxilock Variegated thread. I enjoy variegated thread, but I don’t generally like it when it goes from white to a much darker shade. This one turned out ok. Of course, all the quilting hiccups happened when I was in the darkest thread. It was a bit windy when we were able to snap photos of the quilt. #keepingitreal And of course, the sweet dog wanted to help, too. I did manage to get a few shots of the actual quilting. Each scrappy ring had a design: Center – Long Wishbones Middle Rings – Tight Wishbones Outer Ring – Straight-ish Lines Light Background – Diagonal Spineless Feathers The feather quilting design is more like the Everything Bagel of quilted feathers. I have hooked feathers, curls, real feathers, cheat-y type feathers, and anything else I could think of at that time. The back is a beautiful 108″ wide piece from Joann’s. I pre-washed it to make sure it wouldn’t bleed; washing with a color-catcher. Surprise, the color-catcher was perfectly white at the end of the load. Fantastic! I’ll be buying this one again. All in all, I’m loving the Scrappy Circles Quilt. It measures 72″ x 90″. That’s a wrap. Thank you, my super-tall, quilt-holding assistant! Tell a...

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Giant Fat Quarter Flying Geese – Queen Size

Giant Fat Quarter Flying Geese – Queen Size

on May 29, 2017 in Blog, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting, tutorial | 0 comments

The Fat Quarter Flying Geese free quilt pattern/tutorial makes a queen size quilt using fat quarters. These traditional Flying Geese block units are HUGE! Get your fat quarter pieces out and pull 28 coordinating pieces. No more hoarding fat quarters with this easy, big ole’ design. Fabrics Used in this Quilt 24-piece fat quarter bundle (Garnet, by Nancy Zieman) Plus 4 additional coordinating fat quarters 1 yard of brown for the 4″ border Additional fabric for the binding Using the free pattern, I stitched 55 HUGE geese each measuring 16-1/2″ x 8-1/2″. Note: If you happen to have a layer cake (10″ precut square pieces) rather than a fat quarter bundle, use this Giant Flying Geese with Layer Cakes pattern instead. Sew the Quilt The quilt is arranged in five columns, each with 11 rectangular blocks. The easiest way to create the top:   Start with 56 geese. Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all. Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column. Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs. Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column. Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column. Add a border if you like. Yes, it is pretty random. I like that look.  But, by sewing the geese in pairs first, you do have the option of making a traditional style quilt where the geese (large triangle) points all “fly” in one direction. The quilt is framed in a 4″ brown border. I think it helps with the randomness. The design is quilted focusing the geese (larger) and sky (smaller) triangles separately. Without the borders, the quilt measures approximately 80″ x 88″. Turns out, that is really big for snapping a photo in the back yard. Here it is on the fence…. oops- with wind. I’m sure there’s an actual “flying geese” joke here somewhere…. Ah, wait. Here we go. I love how this turned out and wouldn’t ya know, I have more fat quarters to create another quilt. Tell a...

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Disappearing 9-Patch with Lily and Loom Craftsy

Disappearing 9-Patch with Lily and Loom Craftsy

on Apr 13, 2017 in Blog, fabric stash, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting | 1 comment

This fun Disappearing 9-Patch quilt is made using 10″ precut squares (aka LAYER CAKES)! The quilt features Lily & Loom, new fabric by Boundless, which is releasing on Craftsy.  The layer cake features 42 precut 10″ squares. The whole pack is youthful and bright. Get your fabric bundle here. Using the Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes tutorial, I was able to make the quilt top in an afternoon. The pieces/units are HUGE. And of course, I chain pieced everything, even the binding pieces. I tend to make the binding first so I don’t accidentally use the fabric in the quilt. This quick cutting tool, The Cutting Gizmo, is amazing. I have mentioned it before. I received the cutter for Christmas and am not sure how I quilted for 20+ years without it. Cut, cut, cut and the chain pieced units were read to stitch. See how easily the quilt goes together on the sewing tutorial. I opted to stitch a quick all-over swirl design on my HandiQuilter Avante 18″. Lastly, I just needed to apply binding. I did that by machine, too, making this quilt incredibly fast to stitch. Volia! Finitio! If you’d like to make this quilt for yourself, grab a quilt kit here. This post contains affiliate links. Tell a...

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Platinum Garden: Satin Wholecloth Quilt

Platinum Garden: Satin Wholecloth Quilt

on Mar 28, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting | 6 comments

I’m crazy for this platinum satin whole cloth quilt! It is named Platinum Garden and started out as a wild experiment. A 60″ x 60″ quilting adventure! What I wanted was one of those amazing silk wholecloth quilts with the puffy and fantastic wool battings. Upon further inspection – YIKES – silk is almost $30/yard and wool batting isn’t for the faint of heart. (I couldn’t commit at those prices.) Since this was to be a test, I went with polyester, “platinum” color satin charmeuse and high-loft polyester batting. To top it off, I actually used a bed sheet (50/50% poly cotton) from Walmart as the backing! Pretty crazy, right? As you may know, I’m enjoying a quilting series of whole cloth quilts, like the one in this wholecloth post and this wholecloth post.  As described in those previous adventures, I start with a linear quadrant design like this one: Print the quadrant once, tape it together, and trace it onto the wholecloth four times, or simply print it four times. I opted to just print the full-size quadrant once. Note: This quadrant design is not available for free full-size download. If you’d like to download a quadrant and give it a try, please visit these two posts: wholecloth post and wholecloth post. Since I was using slippery & shifty satin, I decided to use dressmaker’s carbon tracing papers to transfer the design to the quilt’s surface. Of course, I started in right away on the quilting. Some feathers here. Some lines there. A few wishbones in the corners. Then I realized this quilt was WAY too big and to slippery to roll back and forth to work in a symmetrical quilting fashion. Instead, I decided to draw directly on my printed quadrant to serve as a road map for what I was going to quilt when I needed to replicate the top half of the quilt, on the bottom half. I pinned it above my quilt frame as a reference. (I’m going to have lots of holes to patch on that wall if we ever move!) As I would stitch an area, I’d run over to the quadrant and doodle out what I just did. I don’t want you to think...

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Grumpy Cat Quilt

Grumpy Cat Quilt

on Dec 20, 2016 in Blog, Featured, quilt, quilting, SAMQG | 3 comments

Grumpy Cat Quilt Yes, you read that right. It is a Grumpy Cat Quilt. The San Antonio Modern Quilt Guild has a Pop Culture Sewing Bee: everything from Pusheen to Zelda, from Comic-Con to Memes and more! I chose Grumpy Cat as my project for the December meeting. I do not have a pattern for the Gato Gru??n, but here’s how I made him: First, you’ll need an image. I did a google search for “Grumpy Cat Cartoon” thinking the colors and shapes would already be broken down into easy, usable areas. That worked. Save the image Using software, scale the image to the size you want. (I assume you could do this in MS Office/Word, but I used Illustrator.) Print the image using the “tile large pages” or “poster” option. My finished piece is about 18″ x 24″. Tape the image back together. You might find it helpful to outline the shape edges with sharpie. I tried, but the sharpie I was using was on its way out. I taped it to a window (to act as a light board) and traced the outlines of the shapes onto Heat’n Bond fusible web. Label the pieces before you cut them out! If you are making a portrait or image using this method, be advised that the final image will be “flipped” from what you printed. (You can flip the image on the computer before you print, if it isn’t symmetrical – like letters or recognizable places.) Cut out the wacky little heat’n bond shapes and fuse them to the wrong-side of your project fabrics. Now arrange the shapes, using the original printed image as a guide. I worked in little sections. If I had something in the wrong place, I wouldn’t screw up the whole project with one press. Right-side of the Grumpy Cat face Left-side of Grumpy Cat face Nose/Mouth Left ear Right ear Tail and body shadows LAST- eyes. I was nervous about really messing those up. As Melissa Averinos says, the eyes are the most important part of the portrait. Hey, are those cheese-y pigs in a blanket on my plate in the lower right corner (above)? Why, yes they are! You cannot have a sewing...

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Halloween is Monster Madness Quilt Time!

Halloween is Monster Madness Quilt Time!

on Oct 6, 2016 in Blog, quilt | 0 comments

Halloween is?Monster Madness Quilt time! The Monster Madness Quilt is a fun fast project for your little monster AND it is a wonderful Halloween Quilt. Grab the kids and let them be involved in the organic monster shapes, the eyes, and of course, the glasses. The applique shapes are created using Heat’n Bond Lite?and raw edge fusible techniques. The pattern is Fat Quarter Friendly! Fat Quarters are 18″ x 22″ pieces of fabric, generally sold in coordinating bundles. Use solid colors or monochromatic prints to make this quilts. This fun pattern comes to life with the “furry” machine quilting designs. The motifs are included in the pattern and can be replicated on your home/domestic sewing machine. Since this quilt is a 45″ square, it is manageable to free motion quilt in your own space. Let’s see what you create for this holiday (I mean Halloween!) season. See more pictures and get your copy of the Monster Madness Quilt Pattern here in the ReannaLily Designs shop. (paper pattern copy is also available) This quilt is so fast, it might be a fun project for your next children’s group activity or charity quilt project. Tell a...

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Rising Star Quilt Block in Fabric Scraps

Rising Star Quilt Block in Fabric Scraps

on Jun 14, 2016 in quilt | 3 comments

Rising Star Quilt Block in Fabric Scraps The studio was recently cleaned a bit and fabric scraps were sorted by color. I’m now putting those scraps to good use and making AnneMarie Chany’s Rising Star Quilt Block. It will take a little while to cut all the scraps, but I think it will be worth it. I decided to make a two sample blocks using white/off-white background colors and fabric scraps from the “blues” bag for the foreground color. I first chose my scraps by size:?Will this piece be big enough for the four squares I need to cut. Then I sorted again based on value: Will this blue appear dark enough next to a neutral background fabric. Here’s a tip for cutting into your fabric scraps– Make durable templates. These are cut from extra comic book boards, which were previously used when refolding/organizing yardage. I lay the templates on my fabric scrap to see if it is big enough to work with. It is wonderful; no surprises when cutting. Once I know the piece is usable, I still rotary cut my shapes. First step, make half square triangles. I make them without marking the center diagonal lines. Watch this video to see how it is done with the Seamingly Accurate Seam Guide— Once the smaller and larger?triangles were complete, I was able to arrange my test blocks. My block will finish 16″ x 16″. I plan on making 30 of them and having one really large quilt or possibly two small ones. I haven’t decided yet. I’m happy to report the blue blocks went together really well. The neutral/white background pieces are cut and in the project ziploc bag. I’ll now start cutting into all the fabric scrap color bags to create an additional 28 blocks. Who knows when this guy will be finished. =) It will be that on-going, pack-for-retreat project. Of course, I’ll keep you posted on the progress. Tell a...

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Double Aster Barn Quilt

Double Aster Barn Quilt

on Apr 12, 2016 in Blog, quilt | 3 comments

Barn Quilt! Last year I made a barn quilt for my mom. She lives “in the country” and actually has space for a barn quilt. It is finished and hung, though you cannot see it from the road. Why do I mention that? Well- as it turns out, when I bought the wood for mom’s barn quilt, I purchased a 4′ x 8′ sheet of plywood and had them cut the wood in half at the store. Perfect. Two 4′ x 4′ squares! This past weekend, I was able to finally use the second square for myself. I am combining a couple blog ideas from my very own blog to create my new Barn Quilt: The blog posts: First post: I chose the block, Double Aster, based on this collection of posts on my larger Double Aster quilt. It is a 50″ quilt that I made in fabric. See how small those Fiskar Scissors are in comparison to the block? The second blog post is a full?tutorial for creating the barn quilt, which I authored. I used primer (applied with a brush) and spray paint. Painting the NEW?Barn Quilt The Double Aster block when enlarged fits on a 5 x 5 grid. For the fabric quilt, it was ideal to work in 10″ sections to create a 50″ block. For a 48″ x 48″ piece of wood, I had to do a tiny bit of math to mark off my sections. I taped everything off with blue painter’s tape and masked the area with paper. I was able to spray more carefully this time around and very little paint bled below the tape line. My spray paint dried quite quickly which made this a fast project. Once the piece was sealed, it was ready to be hung. (You can see the sunlight progressing in the pictures on my day of painting.) I don’t have a barn. I have a regular house in the regular suburbs. BUT I totally have a wooden fence! My “barn quilt” cannot be seen from the road but looks fine to me from my back porch. It is the official Fence Quilt. I wonder how many other folks have Fence Quilts? Now I have to...

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Huge No-Waste Flying Geese with Fat Quarters

Huge No-Waste Flying Geese with Fat Quarters

on Mar 1, 2016 in Blog, charity, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting, tutorial | 7 comments

My huge no-waste flying geese quest continues! Oh my goodness. I made them recently from layer cakes (precut 10″ fabric squares). I then thought, “What if I don’t have a layer cake and I only have fat quarters?” Oh… this could work, too. So here we go! The size shown in this quilting tutorial is a finished Baby Size quilt- 48″ x 40″ made with 8 fat quarters (precut 18″ x 22″ fabric pieces). Here are some size options: Baby Size – 40″ x 48″ 8 Assorted Fat Quarters Quilt is arranged in a 3 x 5 grid with one extra flying geese block left over. Queen Size – 80″ x 88″ 28 Assorted Fat Quarters Quilt is arranged in a 5 x 11 grid with one extra flying geese block left over. ———————————————————- Divide your fat quarters in half. One half will be used as the large triangle (geese) and the other half will be used as the smaller corner triangles (sky). From the large triangle (geese) pile, cut a single large square measuring 17-1/4″ x 17-1/4″. (For this step, I layered a few fat quarters and cut the squares all at once. From the smaller corner triangle (sky) pile, cut four squares -from each fat quarter!- measuring 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″. ———————————————————- No-Waste Flying Geese Method For each no-waste construction block, you’ll need: 1 large square 4 smaller squares Each construction block will yield FOUR flying geese units. Baby Size = 16 geese units. Queen Size = 56 geese units. Mark a diagonal line on the wrong side of each smaller square using a non-permanent fabric pen. (The red line is digitally added for better visibility. The pen really does mark blue and wash out easily.) Lay two smaller squares in opposite corners of the larger square. Make sure to match right sides and make the marked diagonal lines appear to connect across the entire large block. Pin. Notice the cut edges meet at the outer corners. Use a 1/4″ presser foot to stitch 1/4″ away from the marked line. Flip the entire large square and stitch 1/4″ away from the marked line on the other side. Cut the two halves apart with a rotary cutter. Open and...

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Tic Tac Whoa! Quilt – QuiltCon Reject

Tic Tac Whoa! Quilt – QuiltCon Reject

on Feb 4, 2016 in Blog, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting | 0 comments

How fun is this new quilt? It is named Tic Tac Whoa! This quilt has the distinction of being one my two of the 1200 rejected quilts from QuiltCon West 2016, which is awesome because now I can share it here! The quilt is a large, bed-size quilt at around 70″ x 90″?and is made using applique techniques from my book Learn To Sew Easy Curves. The design was inspired by tic-tac-toe, hence the name, Tic Tac Whoa! The 9-square grid from the game evolved keeping “O’s” in all the boxes and then moving the boxes. You never know where/when a design will happen. Iza Pearl Garden Party Tango Fat Quarter bundle makes up the appliqued lines and circle designs. The circles are prepared with a reverse-applique center in two sizes, 10″ circles and 12″ circles. The edge-to-edge quilting is done using a giant cinnamon roll motif. Is that the official name? Cinnamon Roll? Probably not…. but that’s what you get when you blog around breakfast time. I had to impress upon my assistant that the quilt was very white (front and back) and couldn’t?drag along the ground. Clearly, that meant: carry it on head. hope I can see out. To be 13yo must be a magical time…. Thank you for not letting it drag the ground!! You rock and roll!! Tell a...

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