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Antique Linens Quilt Challenge

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Prepare to be overloaded with images of my Antiques Linen Challenge Quilt.

My local longarm group issued a challenge to stitch up an antique linen in the style made popular by Kelly Cline [1] and others. There are so many cool ways to incorporate old linens into new designs.

The design I went with is more of a Frankenstein version of a linen challenge. I’ll lay out the reasons why I needed to add all sorts of things to this quilt.

It features:

The center of the quilt starts with a men’s handkerchief. It is plain and simple. I bought it at an estate sale and didn’t notice that it had stains on it. I went ahead and appliqued traditional orange peel shapes over the stains.

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I created spaces within my quilt using techniques from Free-Motion Framework [2], my most recent book release. Simply divide the space in to large usable shapes and then practice a quilting fill within that shape.

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The bread basket liner with a crocheted trim was next. I cut the liner into fourths and stay-stitched over the crocheted edge. I then appliqued over the cut crocheted edges with a smaller orange peel design.

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

It was really fun trying to think of different things to quilt into all these spaces. Unfortunately, the pictures jump around a bit. That happens because I was quilting “just one motif” at a time, rolling the quilt up and back on the longarm’s frame.

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

The lovely tan coasters are serving a fantastic purpose. They are covering seams where I mis-measured the solid fabric borders. That’s right, now you all know all my business.

I had two large doilies that I think are intended for end tables. I decided maybe I should chop those in half. The crochet was so tight that even when I cut the pieces with a rotary blade, nothing happened. There was no fray, no wobble, nothing.

At this point my mom suggested set the center of the quilt on-point to make it more interesting. Man, she was right! I generally quilt with the brightest fabrics I can get my hands on, so this piece was a visual challenge.

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs
Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Thank goodness for the Glide Presser Foot! I’m 100% certain this quilt was only stitch-able thanks to the bowl shape floating freely over the lumpy pieces in my quilt.

[3]
Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I added some really neat triangles into the second-to-last border. I needed something to still puff on this design as I’ve quilted most of it to death. The batting in this quilt is one layer of American Fiber 80/20 and one layer of hi-loft Fairfield Poly [4].

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs
Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs
Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs
Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs
Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

This quilt has EVERYTHING, and I’m adding more! I don’t have a photo, but I’ve added four vintage/costume buttons to on-point center of the design. This is to cover up the lack of points on my large orange peel shapes.

I then thought the buttons looked a bit extra, so on all the quilted intersections on the handkerchief: CRYSTALS. Yes. It is out of control. Then I thought, “Well, I own a small cache of crystals, maybe I should put them on every cross-hatched intersection in the triangle border, too.” That isn’t done yet, but man, it will be cool when I’m finished.

Oh, right, you haven’t seen the whole quilt composition. It is very hard to get a photo of this quilt where the features really stand out. I took one, but then altered it to be darker so you may see it a bit better.

Antique Linens Challenge Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

You can see it in person at the Greater San Antonio Quilt Show, Sept 20-21, 2019 [5]

Longarm Gallery Update

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery,quilting,SAMQG | No Comments
ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery

After a brief blogging break, I wanted to share more longarm quilting pictures with you.

I’m enjoying free-motion quilting on my customer’s quilts and my own. I think I learn something with each new quilt, which is always good news.

The quilt below is part of my 2019 Challenge Fabric Quilt entry for the Greater San Antonio Quilt Guild’s show on Sept 20-21 [5]. I cannot show you the whole piece quite yet. Just know, it is asymmetrical and absolutely bananas-looking.

ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery

I’ve been lucky to custom quilt a few projects for some local San Antonio area friends. Check out their quilts:

ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery
ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery

A new friend found me online and mailed this next quilt from their duty station in Japan. This semi-custom small quilt is so charming!

ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery

With a quick turn-around, I was able to get the San Antonio Modern Quilt Guild [6]‘s charity quilt quilted and bound and mailed in time for the big show, QuiltCon [7], in Nashville last month. It is a conceptual beach scene with sand, sea glass, and breaking waves.

ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery

And of course, I love doing edge-to-edge designs all over quilts. An edge-to-edge is any design that I can draw with the longarm that literally travels from one edge of the quilt to the other without stopping.

ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery
ReannaLily Designs | Jen Eskridge | Longarm Gallery

If you want me to longarm a quilt for you, please email me [8] or see more details on my ReannaLilyQuilts.com [9] page.

Custom Quilting Gallery – Sampler Quilts

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery,quilting | No Comments

Let’s take a peek at two very different custom quilted sampler quilts. All the quilts featured in this post were created by my customers. I added the longarm quilting to showcase the blocks. Sampler quilts, or block of the month quilts, are so tricky because each block is receiving its own unique design. If you have a quilt you’d like for me to finish, read more at www.reannalilyquilts.com [10] or drop me an email. [8]

Local Quilt Shop’s Block of the Month

First up is a block of the month hosted by a local quilt shop. My customer picked up fabrics each month and created her blocks. I think this is the 2017-2018 project. See my customer’s whole quilt on her instagram [11].

I kept the borders a bit simple so the blocks would really stand out.

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

Now onto the ruler work and stitching designs. I tried to apply the Divide and Design [12] method to each block.

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

For consistency, I also tried to keep types of block units treated in a similar fashion. By that I mean, if a block had a large square, it would get a sort of 4-corner star. If it was a small square it would have orange peel stitching. It didn’t always work, but it helped quite a bit.

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

And sometimes, I didn’t pay too much attention to the piecing at all. I jumped right in to create new shapes by connecting points with in the block. You can see four “footballs” in the block below.

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

If you have a quilt you’d like for me to finish, read more at www.reannalilyquilts.com [10] or drop me an email. [8]

A Kit Turned Into a Quilt

My customer tells me this quilt has been in progress for quite some time. She wanted to have it quilted to be in a show next year. I cannot wait to see it. You can see more of this customer’s amazing work in her shop on etsy [13].

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

I’ll be honest with you, this sampler was incredible and far outside my quilting comfort zone. It has everything.

Flying geese, applique, traditional blocks, sashing, no discernible grid, and more!

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

I don’t see too many traditional quilts come through my studio. The challenge is incredible, though. That part, I love. I hope my customer loved it, too.

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

Like with the previous sampler, I tried to stay consistent in my “certain shapes get certain treatments” plan. All flying geese blocks have connected wishbone stitching lines.

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

The quilt is very densely quilted, too.

Custom Quilted Sampler | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

Her workmanship was next level. I spent most of the time working on this quilt just hoping I don’t mess it up. It was so complex and stunning.

If you have a quilt you’d like for me to finish, read more at www.reannalilyquilts.com [10] or drop me an email. [8]

And Don’t Forget Edge to Edge

For good measure, lets take a minute to love the wispy ribbon swirls of a fantastic edge-to-edge design.

What does edge-to-edge mean? In the most simple terms, it means I can use my longarm quilting machine to stitch from one edge of your quilt to the other without stopping.

Edge to Edge Swirl Quilting | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Quilts | Customer Quilt

These long swirls that look a bit like ribbons are a new addition to my edge-to-edge free-motion stitching designs. If you have a quilt you’d like for me to finish, read more at www.reannalilyquilts.com [10] or drop me an email. [8]

 

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panels From Spoonflower

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Books,Featured,FMFWQ,Longarm Quilting Gallery,Notions | 1 Comment

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower [14]

Grab Your Quilt Panels Today!

I’m so happy to announce the new release of Free-Motion Framework PANELS [14]! These 36″ x 36″ square panels are directly inspired from the best-selling title, Free-Motion Framework [2].

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing [2]

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog. [15]

In the Isolating Shapes chapter of Free-Motion Framework [2], we cover how to take any linear framework and select areas in which to quilt. I’ve illustrated how easy it is to isolate shapes by color-blocking them in as a visual aid. Well, as luck would have it, those color-blocked images looked really cool.

With the help of C & T Publishing [16], nine fabric quilt panels are now available at Spoonflower.com [14]!

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower [14]

Purchasing

Choosing your panel couldn’t be easier. Simply head over to the Free-Motion Framework Collection at Spoonflower.com [17] from the ReannaLily Designs shop [18] and select your favorite design.

You’ll be able to choose your fabric type. For this demonstration piece, I choose satin. It’s only $.50 more than the woven cotton, and the results are stunning.

You’ll also have the option to pick a test swatch, fat quarter, or yard. Choose Yard.

Notice also, the fabric width is 42″. The design will repeat a bit. (Shown marked off in RED below.) This is actually perfect because it gives you a chance to test out ideas and colors before stitching them directly onto the 36″ square panel. Neat trick, right?

Spoonflower and Jen Eskridge bring you Quilt Panels [17]Threads

For my own project, I opted to match thread colors with the color-blocked shapes. Here’s my suggestions:

Glide Threads perfect for Free-Motion Framework Panels by Jen Eskridge

Quilting

Using my HandiQuilter Avante [19] longarm I set up the satin panel with wool batting, just as I would load any other quilt. You absolutely can do this on a domestic machine, as well.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

As suggested in Free-Motion Framework [2], I worked symmetrically, trying to complete a single color at a time. The satin is quite shifty, so I opted to pin baste around the quilt top as I stitched.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

It was so neat to work within coloring shapes. Trying to stay “in the lines” is an added level of control and practice.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

You can really see the satin “puff” and pins in this next image.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Working on this small panel for only a day, you can also see the light change throughout the day, on the photos. Thank you, quilt texture and shiny fabric.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Once the project panel started looking like it would come together nicely, I really started snapping a thousand pictures.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

I actually quilted all the color threads, leaving a large portion of the linen area un-stitched. I just couldn’t decide what type of quilting fill I’d like to put in the space. Finally, I decided on hooked feathers. That last area really completed the design.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower
Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower
Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Finishing

Finishing the edge of a quilt is traditionally done with a quilt binding. I wasn’t sure if a cotton fabric around a fantastically shiny quilt would look right. Facing the quilt seemed like the best option. I was able to trim my quilt 1/4″ past the panel’s printed design. By doing this, it added a seam allowance to the piece and allows me to add the facing without cutting into the actual shapes, points and design of quilt panel.

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower
Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Of course, light is everything.

Above: Inside.

Below: Outside

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Free-Motion Framework Quilt Panel from Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | Spoonflower

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog. [15]

I hope you grab a panel for yourself. It is a great way to practice your machine quilting skills while creating a really cool quilt.

If you are on social media, share your work with the hashtag #FMFWQ [20] or #FreeMotionFramework. [21]

Fabric Scraps for Military Retirement Quilt

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,book,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery,quilting | 1 Comment

Adding Fabric Scraps to a Military Retirement Quilt

Thankfully, we are celebrating a retirement here in the family! How does a quilter celebrate? With a quilt, of course! The quilt is a gift for someone very close to the retiree. I hope she likes it!

Design Inspiration

Back in January, Heather Kojan [22] on Instagram shared a photo of a blue scrap quilt. On her instagram feed [22], she mentions that her quilt is loosely based on a design she created for 100 Blocks years ago. My quilt is based on her single image, which is, of course, a traditional signature-style block [23]:

[22]

The design is gorgeous and simply elegant. Scraps set on the diagonal. Of course, her scraps are much more orderly and of more uniform size, hue, and value.

The Scrap Quilt

My blue scrap pile was a big ole wild mess of color values and scrap piece sizes. I was still able to piece and create shapes from which to cut one diagonal piece and two setting triangles. The templates were created from freezer paper [24]. My 20 blocks are 15″ square with a 6″ wide diagonal section. Since this retirement quilt celebrates 20 years in the United States Air Force, I mixed in a few pieces of military uniform, too.

My quilt is 4 blocks x 5 blocks. With borders it measures roughly 70″ x 85″.

Using the military uniform in the quilt was a no-brainer for me, since almost 10 years ago I authored the book Deploy That Fabric [25]. Man, I love that book so much!

Deploy That Fabric Cover [25]Longarm Quilting Design

What I didn’t do 10 years ago was longarm quilt my own military uniform + fabric quilt designs.

I was nervous, but the quilting was actually quite smooth. My basic block design features two curling feather designs in each white triangle and a wide wishbone pattern on the scrappy/military diagonal line.

This was the first time I tried curling feathers.

Thank goodness for practicing on a white board to develop muscle memory.

The diagonal wishbones were quilted in one long quilting pass. The quilt is loaded onto the frame horizontally. As in, I rotate the quilt 90 degrees from how it would lay on a bed. By doing this, I can quilt the longest pass possible and advance the quilt fewer times.

The military uniform pieces are cut from the no-longer-worn uniform shirt, complete with pockets, welt seams, and character. (aka ink pen stain). The HandiQuilter didn’t hesitate stitching over the heavy welt seams. Sewing slower helped. A nametape was added once the quilt top was complete, but there’s no way I was going to try to quilt over that.

I think this quilt will be a hit. It will be gifted before the big retirement celebration coming up. Thank you for your service!

[26]

Free-Motion Framework Special Trunk Show Exhibit

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,FMFWQ,Longarm Quilting Gallery | 4 Comments

Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts

Free-Motion Framework Quilts Trunk Show!

Take a peek at the Free-Motion Framework [27] Quilt Trunk Show at Sew Special Quilts, in San Antonio, Texas [28]. The show will be installed from May 18 through June 8th. See work from the contributing quilters and myself. If you are in the area or on a short holiday here at the end of May, please swing by!

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing [27]

Trunk Show

The show features a selection of quilts from the book [27] as well as the three workshop samples and two quilts made from the bonus designs included in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package [29].

Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts

Launch Party & Book Signing

In addition, I’m so honored that Sew Special Quilts [28] has offered to not only share the show but also host a Launch Party & Book Signing on June 8, from 6:30-8p. SAVE THE DATE. Bring your copy or pick up one the night of the event. Meet the author (me!), and ask all the questions you like while I demonstrate how to take a simple line drawing and, surprisingly easily, create a version of a wholecloth quilt.

The photo below shows the finished quilt, left, and the line drawing used to create the quilt on the right. I’ll elaborate more at the party or grab your copy of Free-Motion Framework [27] to see how the magic happens.

Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts [27]

I’ll see you at the party!

Updated to add: [30]See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog. [15]

Afternoon Picnic Quilt by Nancy Zieman Productions for Riley Blake

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery | 6 Comments

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

Custom Quilting for Riley Blake and Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC.

It was my honor to custom quilt this sample for Riley Blake Designs’ booth at Spring Quilt Market 2018. The beautiful small quilt is designed by Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC’s team and will be displayed with all the other new fabric lines launching this season.

Custom quilting is so exciting as it gives the project a whole second dimension, though technically, I supposed I should say a third dimension. Of course, there’s only a tiny bit of pressure when the quilt will be seen at the high Quilt Market level. Phew! I think it turned out alright.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

The entire design is stitched using my hand-guided HandiQuilter Avante 18, using free-motion quilting techniques and rulers.

Defining and Combining Shapes

I started first with converging straight lines in alternating blocks.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

I added pebbles in the 3″ corners of each block. They look cool, but man, as I may have mentioned before, I do not like stitching them.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

Hum. So star shapes and borders are remaining. There was some brainstorming here. Do I sub-dive the stars? Do I treat them as one shape? Should I focus on eight triangles and one square? In the end, the large star won out. I echo quilted 1/4″ from the shape’s perimeter and then filled the design with very small pointed swirls.

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

Border Decisions

The border needed to be more subtle to not detract from the quilt design as a whole. The modified piano key style features a 1/4″ stitched line every inch-and-a-half or so. The ruler I used didn’t have regular measurements, but did have a printed logo. Each line jump is aligned with the printed logo. Technical, right?

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

In many cases, you will really see the quilting from the back. This is especially true if the back is a solid or tone-on-tone fabric. Here, the backing is 108″ wide Riley Blake Snow tonal fabric. [31]

Custom Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs - ReannaLily Quilts - Longarm Quilting

If you are at quilt market this weekend and see this little lovely hanging in the Riley Blake Designs Booth, snap a picture for me.

If you are looking for a longarm quilter, I’m your gal! See more details at reannalilyquilts.com [9].

 

Nested 9-Patch Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery,quilting | 2 Comments

 

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

Custom Quilted Nested 9-Patch Pattern

In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Nested 9-Patch Quilts [32] for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt three new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals [33]collection for Penny Rose Fabrics [34], a division of Riley Blake Designs. [34]

Farmhouse Florals by Nancy Zieman [33]

The first quilt, Shiplap Ahoy [35] was the focus in January, and Spinning 4-Patch [36] last month. Today, the third pattern, Nested 9-Patch [37] is showcased.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [37]The quilt is constructed using simple strip-pieced sewing techniques which are on the NZP blog today [37].

All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs [38] in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com [9].

Planning to Quilt

Each block has exactly the same seam lines. The color palette is soft so picking a quilting thread color wasn’t too tricky. I opted for Bone [39] color glide 40wt thread. Before I started quilting, though, I really needed a design!

The beautiful 9-patch blocks are set on point, which means to quilt within each block will be wider than my longarm’s throat space. That means I will need to come up with a design where I can stitch the top half of the block, advance the quilt, then stitch the lower half of each block.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

I decided to approach this quilt with Lisa Calle’s Divide and Design [40] method. My basic take-away from her book is to find points to connect within the block. Not necessarily seams or intersections, but rather points like “half way through this side” or “one inch passed the middle of this seam.”

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

First,I stitched and echoed arches from corner to corner having the apex fall about 1″ past the middle of the inner seam. I added hooked feathers under the arch shape.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

Next, I stitched another diamond shape in the center of the 9-patch. I added wishbone stitches in each new corner created.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

Here’s a top view. You can really see the arch and diamond shape pop a bit more in this picture.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

And as always, if you use a solid color quilt backing, you will REALLY see the quilting lines.

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]The back of each of the quilts is a 108″ wide mottled white by Riley Blake Fabrics [41].

Fabric and Pattern Give Away

Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC [37] is giving away a fat quarter bundle and pattern on their blog. Hop over to see how to enter to win!

Nested 9-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [37]

*Some images used belong to NZP, LLC. 
*This post contains a few affiliate links.

Spinning 4-Patch Quilted by Jen Eskridge

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery | No Comments

Spinning 4-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [32]

Custom Quilted Spinning 4-Patch Pattern

In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Spinning 4-Patch Quilts [32] for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals [33]collection for Penny Rose Fabrics [34], a division of Riley Blake Designs. [34]

Farmhouse Florals by Nancy Zieman [33]

NZP is releasing three patterns for this fabric collection. The first one, Shiplap Ahoy [35] was the focus last month. Read more here. Today, the second pattern, Spinning 4-Patch [32] is showcased.

[32]

The quilt is constructed using simple strip-pieced sewing techniques which are on the NZP blog today [32].

All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs [38] in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com [9].

Planning to Quilt

 

Each block has exactly the same seam lines. The color palette is soft so picking a quilting thread color wasn’t too tricky. I opted for Bone [39] color glide 40wt thread. Before I started quilting, though, I really needed a design! I started with a piece of Plexiglas laid over the quilt, which was already loaded on the longarm frame.

With a dry erase marker, I am able to audition different design lines to see if they fit, if I could stitch them, and if they looked fantastic. This first concept did not look fantastic to me. The spineless feathers wrapping around the block would be interesting, but it wasn’t enough.

Spinning 4-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

I ended up stitching in the ditch around all the block shapes first.

On the advice of my artsy daughter, (@meepsketch on Instagram [42]), I created diagonal lines with a ruler, to connect opposite corner rectangles. The spineless feathers would still be in the space that didn’t feature ruler work.

Spinning 4-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

The pale yellow sashing is quilted with a simple wishbone design. Also know as, my solid go-to design.

Spinning 4-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

The quilting is hard to see on a few of the beautiful floral prints, but the consistent texture is very neat.

Spinning 4-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

Spinning 4-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

By quilting diagonal lines, alternating direction in each block, the quilting creates a secondary visual design. (Turns out, the solid white backing was a bit tricky to photograph indoors.)

Spinning 4-Patch longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman [9]

The back of each of the quilts is a 108″ wide mottled white by Riley Blake Fabrics [41].

Fabric and Pattern Give Away

Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC [32] is giving away a fat quarter bundle and pattern on their blog. Hop over to see how to enter to win!

[32]

 

*Some images used belong to NZP, LLC. 
*This post contains a few affiliate links.

Hand Applique Charity Quilt

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,charity,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery | 2 Comments

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

Longarm Quilting the Hand Applique Quilt

As a longarm quilter, I don’t see too many hand applique quilts. It isn’t because the quilts aren’t out there; I just don’t seem to travel in those circles. When the opportunity arose to finish a hand applique charity quilt, I jumped on it. The Greater San Antonio Quilt Guild has this in their collection of “Projects to Finish.” Yes, my guild has its own UFO pile! I’m on the committee to help finish them. The finished quilts then get donated to our bi-annual quilt auction fundraiser.

We do not know the quilt’s original maker or makers. While longarm quilting, it does appear that a single person stitched all six blocks.

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

The applique needs to shine! I followed applique quilting the inspiration from my very-quilty mother-in-law [43].

First, I outlined each block’s 12″ perimeter by stitching in the ditch. Or more accurately: Stitching-in-the-vacinity-in-a-sorta-straight-ish-line-around-near-the-seam ditch.

The fills are pretty wild and random around each shape. I added a few stitching lines within the applique to secure the design a bit further. Not every shape has quilting on top of it, though. Here’s a closer look at the blocks:

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

The sashing is untreated. I thought by leaving it without quilting it will “puff” the way the applique shapes puff. The border was a different story.

During a Karlee Porter Graffiti Quilting Class [44], she says something to the effect of: If you don’t want the hassle of making feathers symmetrical on both sides of the spine, don’t quilt feathers on both sides. Pretty smart! Hooked feathers are on the inside of the wavy spine and free-hand drawn lines are on the outside.

Hand Applique Quilt - Longarm Quilting by Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Quilts

This quilt inspires me. The challenge is exciting! The pink  hand applique quilt is now onto another guild member, Janet [13], for binding, then off to the auction in September.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Featured,Longarm Quilting Gallery,quilting | 2 Comments

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Custom Quilted Shiplap Ahoy Quilts Pattern

In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Shiplap Ahoy Quilts for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals [33]collection for Penny Rose Fabrics [34], a division of Riley Blake Designs. [34]

Farmhouse Florals by Nancy Zieman [33]

NZP is releasing three patterns for this fabric collection. The first one, featured today, is Shiplap Ahoy [45]. Nancy designed, edited, and tweaked this pattern early last year. It is truly amazing how far in advance the entire quilting community works.

Shiplapy Ahoy by Nancy Zieman [45]

The quilt is offered in two different color palettes. Both full-size quilt photos are on the NZP blog today [45]. Taking two reasonably identical quilts and custom quilt them differently was tricky.

All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs [38] in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com [9].

Blue and White Quilt

Each block in the quilt features three or four rows with an assorted number of three-dimensional triangles. I opted to quilt straight lines around the triangle shape to highlight the angles. I also quilted a Fluer De Lis in the triangles themselves.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Stretched-out wishbone shapes are quilted into the sashing.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

The back of each of the quilts is a 108″ wide mottled white by Riley Blake Fabrics [41]. You can really see the quilting on the backs.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Multi-Color Quilt

The multi-color version of this quilt has each of the five shiplap print colors from the Farmhouse Florals collection [33] used as backgrounds for the blocks.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

I switched up the quilting design in this multi-color quilt to stitch wishbones in the block.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

The Bone [39] color glide 40wt thread shows up differently on each background color.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Again, the white backing fabric shows off all the quilting designs. Notice, I outlined the triangles, and they do not have a motif added within the shape.

Shiplap Ahoy Quilts longarm quilted by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | Nancy Zieman

Fabric and Pattern Give Away

Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC [45] is giving away a fat quarter bundle and pattern on their blog. Hop over to see how to enter to win!

Shiplap Ahoy and Farmhouse Floral Bundle [45]

 

*Some images used belong to NZP, LLC. 
*This post contains a few affiliate links.

Buggin Out: Machine Quilted Wholecloth

Posted By Jen Eskridge On In Blog,Featured,FMFWQ,Longarm Quilting Gallery | 10 Comments

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt

Another practice wholecloth quilt came to being over the winter break. I challenged myself with purple Glide thread on orange cotton fabric. Yikes! At first it seemed a bit counter-intuitive, but I really wanted to have high contrasting colors so I could focus on making better stitches, lines, and curves.

I used HandiQuilter Avante 18″ longarm to create the quilt. The whole thing is stitched using free-motion quilting and rulers. There’s no computer guided quilting.

Design

As you may know, I’m enjoying a quilting series of whole cloth quilts, like the one in this wholecloth post, [46] this wholecloth post, [47] and Platinum Garden [48], which will be seen at Road to California [49] January 2018. As described in those previous adventures, I start with a linear quadrant design like this one:

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Print the quadrant once, tape it together, and trace it onto the wholecloth four times, or simply print it four times. I opted to just print the full-size quadrant once. Note: This quadrant design is not available for free full-size download. The design is a bonus pattern in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package [29].

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

For more on this style of quilting, using a linear design/framework to accidently stitch a wholecloth quilt, check out Free-Motion Framework [50].

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing [50]

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here. [15]

Once the design is traced, I isolate shapes to fill in. As long as I fill them in symmetrically, I’ll get a cool wholecloth quilt. It will look like I took time to plan this quilt, but really, I just made notes of what I stitched in each shape and repeated the design in all four quadrants.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

I was be-bopping along at a good clip when I remembered to take pictures! I had the good sense to draw what I stitched, as I stitched it, on the full-size paper tracing template. It was so easy to use it as a reference. It doesn’t look like much, but here’s a peek:

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

The entire quilt is traced with a blue water soluble marker [51]. Spray the quilt with water while it is still on the frame to see all the marks disappear.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Of course, if I were planning to block this quilt so it will lay/hang  perfectly square, the marker could be removed at that step.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

I wanted to try to snap a few different angles of the high-contrast thread. This is the center of the entire quilt. Though the original design has points converging at the center, I opted to add a big circle to cover that area. I don’t think my straight line ruler stitches would have matched. Maybe on the next practice quilt.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Filling in shapes with different densities is my favorite. It makes the piece look like it has actual light and dark values achieved only through thread.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Goals

Here are a few of my quilting goals with this design:

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Trimming the quilt is definitely an area where I need more practice. I’ll add that to my next quilt’s goal list. I think it will be much more helpful on my next time, if I trace out exactly where the edge of the quilt will fall. I really want to create designs where I do no accidentally need to chop off parts of those rascally feathers.

I’ll also be adding “work on starts-and-stops” to my next quilt’s goals, too. Each project lets me practice and learn more about what I’m stitching.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

When you look at the quilt straight-on, it turned out pretty cool. The Buggin Out element I had envisioned turned into scissor handles, but that’s all up to interpretation.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Backing

Backing is pieced from extra wide backs leftover from previous quilts. I put zero thought into the backing, as you can see. For these smaller 40″ square designs, they will likely be wall hanging size, so the back isn’t as important to me. That is just me, though.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

The bobbin thread is Superior Bob pre-wound bobbins in white [52]. You can see the quilting has a different feel with out the in-your-face purple.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Binding

The second-to-last step is always binding. For the first time, I cut my binding strips only 2″ wide. My binding is machine applied to the back, and machine finished from the front. It made a very narrow and tidy finish to this wholecloth design.

My label is a short, hand-written scribble in Micron Pen .05 [53] onto the backing fabric to say:

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework [50], shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON [50].