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Longarm Quilting Gallery

Longarm quilting gallery for ReannaLily Designs and ReannaLily Quilts. See these styles for your next longarm quilting service purchase. Thanks for looking!

Nested 9-Patch Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

Nested 9-Patch Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

on Mar 24, 2018 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 1 comment

  Custom Quilted Nested 9-Patch Pattern In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Nested 9-Patch Quilts for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt three new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals collection for Penny Rose Fabrics, a division of Riley Blake Designs. The first quilt, Shiplap Ahoy was the focus in January, and Spinning 4-Patch last month. Today, the third pattern, Nested 9-Patch is showcased. The quilt is constructed using simple strip-pieced sewing techniques which are on the NZP blog today. All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com. Planning to Quilt Each block has exactly the same seam lines. The color palette is soft so picking a quilting thread color wasn’t too tricky. I opted for Bone color glide 40wt thread. Before I started quilting, though, I really needed a design! The beautiful 9-patch blocks are set on point, which means to quilt within each block will be wider than my longarm’s throat space. That means I will need to come up with a design where I can stitch the top half of the block, advance the quilt, then stitch the lower half of each block. I decided to approach this quilt with Lisa Calle’s Divide and Design method. My basic take-away from her book is to find points to connect within the block. Not necessarily seams or intersections, but rather points like “half way through this side” or “one inch passed the middle of this seam.” First,I stitched and echoed arches from corner to corner having the apex fall about 1″ past the middle of the inner seam. I added hooked feathers under the arch shape. Next, I stitched another diamond shape in the center of the 9-patch. I added wishbone stitches in each new corner created. Here’s a top view. You can really see the arch and diamond shape...

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Spinning 4-Patch Quilted by Jen Eskridge

Spinning 4-Patch Quilted by Jen Eskridge

on Feb 24, 2018 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery | 0 comments

Custom Quilted Spinning 4-Patch Pattern In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Spinning 4-Patch Quilts for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals collection for Penny Rose Fabrics, a division of Riley Blake Designs. NZP is releasing three patterns for this fabric collection. The first one, Shiplap Ahoy was the focus last month. Read more here. Today, the second pattern, Spinning 4-Patch is showcased. The quilt is constructed using simple strip-pieced sewing techniques which are on the NZP blog today. All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com. Planning to Quilt   Each block has exactly the same seam lines. The color palette is soft so picking a quilting thread color wasn’t too tricky. I opted for Bone color glide 40wt thread. Before I started quilting, though, I really needed a design! I started with a piece of Plexiglas laid over the quilt, which was already loaded on the longarm frame. With a dry erase marker, I am able to audition different design lines to see if they fit, if I could stitch them, and if they looked fantastic. This first concept did not look fantastic to me. The spineless feathers wrapping around the block would be interesting, but it wasn’t enough. I ended up stitching in the ditch around all the block shapes first. On the advice of my artsy daughter, (@meepsketch on Instagram), I created diagonal lines with a ruler, to connect opposite corner rectangles. The spineless feathers would still be in the space that didn’t feature ruler work. The pale yellow sashing is quilted with a simple wishbone design. Also know as, my solid go-to design. The quilting is hard to see on a few of the beautiful floral prints, but the consistent texture is very neat. By quilting diagonal lines, alternating direction...

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Hand Applique Charity Quilt

Hand Applique Charity Quilt

on Feb 19, 2018 in Blog, charity, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery | 2 comments

Longarm Quilting the Hand Applique Quilt As a longarm quilter, I don’t see too many hand applique quilts. It isn’t because the quilts aren’t out there; I just don’t seem to travel in those circles. When the opportunity arose to finish a hand applique charity quilt, I jumped on it. The Greater San Antonio Quilt Guild has this in their collection of “Projects to Finish.” Yes, my guild has its own UFO pile! I’m on the committee to help finish them. The finished quilts then get donated to our bi-annual quilt auction fundraiser. We do not know the quilt’s original maker or makers. While longarm quilting, it does appear that a single person stitched all six blocks. The applique needs to shine! I followed applique quilting the inspiration from my very-quilty mother-in-law. First, I outlined each block’s 12″ perimeter by stitching in the ditch. Or more accurately: Stitching-in-the-vacinity-in-a-sorta-straight-ish-line-around-near-the-seam ditch. The fills are pretty wild and random around each shape. I added a few stitching lines within the applique to secure the design a bit further. Not every shape has quilting on top of it, though. Here’s a closer look at the blocks: The sashing is untreated. I thought by leaving it without quilting it will “puff” the way the applique shapes puff. The border was a different story. During a Karlee Porter Graffiti Quilting Class, she says something to the effect of: If you don’t want the hassle of making feathers symmetrical on both sides of the spine, don’t quilt feathers on both sides. Pretty smart! Hooked feathers are on the inside of the wavy spine and free-hand drawn lines are on the outside. This quilt inspires me. The challenge is exciting! The pink  hand applique quilt is now onto another guild member, Janet, for binding, then off to the auction in...

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Shiplap Ahoy Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

Shiplap Ahoy Quilt Finished by Jen Eskridge

on Jan 28, 2018 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 2 comments

Custom Quilted Shiplap Ahoy Quilts Pattern In early October 2017, I had the honor of quilting Shiplap Ahoy Quilts for Nancy Zieman. I work as the free-lance blog and social media person for Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC. (NZP) As a fantastic bonus, the team selected me to custom quilt new patterns NZP would be releasing which feature the Farmhouse Florals collection for Penny Rose Fabrics, a division of Riley Blake Designs. NZP is releasing three patterns for this fabric collection. The first one, featured today, is Shiplap Ahoy. Nancy designed, edited, and tweaked this pattern early last year. It is truly amazing how far in advance the entire quilting community works. The quilt is offered in two different color palettes. Both full-size quilt photos are on the NZP blog today. Taking two reasonably identical quilts and custom quilt them differently was tricky. All the quilting shown here is created with longarm quilting rulers and free-motion quilting designs. I work on a HandiQuilter Avante 18 and generally use Glide Thread in the needle and Superior Pre-wound Bobs in the bobbin. Read more about my set-up and style at ReannaLilyQuilts.com. Blue and White Quilt Each block in the quilt features three or four rows with an assorted number of three-dimensional triangles. I opted to quilt straight lines around the triangle shape to highlight the angles. I also quilted a Fluer De Lis in the triangles themselves. Stretched-out wishbone shapes are quilted into the sashing. The back of each of the quilts is a 108″ wide mottled white by Riley Blake Fabrics. You can really see the quilting on the backs. Multi-Color Quilt The multi-color version of this quilt has each of the five shiplap print colors from the Farmhouse Florals collection used as backgrounds for the blocks. I switched up the quilting design in this multi-color quilt to stitch wishbones in the block. The Bone color glide 40wt thread shows up differently on each background color. Again, the white backing fabric shows off all the quilting designs. Notice, I outlined the triangles, and they do not have a motif added within the shape. Fabric and Pattern Give Away Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC is giving away a fat quarter bundle and pattern...

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Buggin Out: Machine Quilted Wholecloth

Buggin Out: Machine Quilted Wholecloth

on Jan 2, 2018 in Blog, Featured, FMFWQ, Longarm Quilting Gallery | 10 comments

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Another practice wholecloth quilt came to being over the winter break. I challenged myself with purple Glide thread on orange cotton fabric. Yikes! At first it seemed a bit counter-intuitive, but I really wanted to have high contrasting colors so I could focus on making better stitches, lines, and curves. I used HandiQuilter Avante 18″ longarm to create the quilt. The whole thing is stitched using free-motion quilting and rulers. There’s no computer guided quilting. Design As you may know, I’m enjoying a quilting series of whole cloth quilts, like the one in this wholecloth post, this wholecloth post, and Platinum Garden, which will be seen at Road to California January 2018. As described in those previous adventures, I start with a linear quadrant design like this one: Print the quadrant once, tape it together, and trace it onto the wholecloth four times, or simply print it four times. I opted to just print the full-size quadrant once. Note: This quadrant design is not available for free full-size download. The design is a bonus pattern in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package. For more on this style of quilting, using a linear design/framework to accidently stitch a wholecloth quilt, check out Free-Motion Framework. Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here. Once the design is traced, I isolate shapes to fill in. As long as I fill them in symmetrically, I’ll get a cool wholecloth quilt. It will look like I took time to plan this quilt, but really, I just made notes of what I stitched in each shape and repeated the design in all four quadrants. I was be-bopping along at a good clip when I remembered to take pictures! I had the good sense to draw what I stitched, as I stitched it, on the full-size paper tracing template. It was so easy to use it as a reference. It doesn’t look like much, but here’s a peek: The entire quilt is traced with a blue water soluble marker. Spray the quilt with water while it is still on the frame to see all the marks disappear. Of course, if I were planning to block this quilt so it will...

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Custom Longarm Quilting: Blue Patchwork Stars Quilt

Custom Longarm Quilting: Blue Patchwork Stars Quilt

on Dec 16, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery | 2 comments

Custom Longarm Quilting Lets talk for a minute about Custom Longarm Quilting. I’ve recently dipped my toe into the custom quilting world after practicing extensively using the Longarm Skill Builder method. It is a journey but the pay off is amazing. The look of custom quilting is really one-of-a-kind.  If you make a wholecloth skill builder, like the one linked, and share it socially, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON. The Longarm Skill Builder method is wonderful to really get into the groove of filling spaces, but I needed a bit of direction to help me decided which spaces to fill if I were working on an actual patchwork quilt. Enter Lisa Calle’s Divide and Design book. If you don’t have this book, add it to your wish list right now. I applied her methods to my last customer quilt of 2017 to create a really unique finished quilt. Using the “markup” feature in my iphone images, I snapped a pic of the quilt and then proceeded to brainstorm how I would divide the space on my customer quilt. When I had something I liked, I saved it to my camera roll. (Turns out I went with a different design than what is pictured below.) I love how it turned out so much that you’d better go grab a cup of coffee because there are many many many photos of this baby. Blocks One pass along my HandiQuilter Avante 18″ only covered about 2/3rds of the block. This is what one pass looks like: I then went back and stitched the bottom 1/3 of each block. Sashing It took me far longer than it should have to decide on a style for the sashing. Ultimately, I went with an easy/fast design. I traced the arc of a ruler twice on the right side and twice on the left side. The arc intersecting is what creates this seemingly complex design. Borders Lastly, I had to decide a style to add into the 4″ wide, two-color border design along the top and bottom edge of the quilt. I ended up going with...

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Longarm Quilting Edge-to-Edge Designs

Longarm Quilting Edge-to-Edge Designs

on Dec 14, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 0 comments

Longarm Quilting Edge-to-Edge Designs The blog has been quiet for a month as I’ve longarm machine quilted on a collection on customer quilts. I’m happy to share a quick slide show with you this morning. Everything featured here is considered an Edge-To-Edge design. What does that mean? Simply, for me to finish quilting your quilt I can travel from one edge to the other using one design motif without having to stop and change designs with shapes or use a ruler to outline patchwork designs. Having said that, this is how I consider Edge-To-Edge design at my longarm company, ReannaLily Quilts. Your longarm quilter may have a different definition. Above: The first photo has rows and rows of wild “spineless” feathers stitched in Wisteria Glide Thread on a rail fence quilt pattern design stitch in batik fabrics, similar to these fabrics at Craftsy. Christmas Tree Banner   The back is where you can really see the almost Edge-to-Edge design. For this quilt, I did a combination of quick Edge-to-Edge styles, but I did switch up the motif within each shape. I didn’t use rulers on the project, though. The pattern she used is called Tall Trim the Tree, I believe. Meandering Hearts The quilted gift is for her daughter and has hearts stitched into the meandering design to showcase the hearts in the fabric prints. Tessellating Fish My customer suggested a traditional clamshell design for his quilt. As he envisioned, the clams look like fish scales on his Tessellating Fish quilt.  Cool effect, right? City Skyline A panel with a border makes a very fast quilt design. My customer started with a panel similar to this one: City-scape by Hoffman, and framed it nicely. The quilted design did feature ruler work, but I consider it more of an edge-to-edge in this case since I didn’t outline any patches. To quilt this design, I stitched random straight (vertical-to-the-city) lines and followed the angles of the buildings. Lava Thread! Next is a quilt created by a grandmother and grand-daughter. Fun, right? The only thing that would make this large-scale pinwheel quilt more fun is a triangle-meander in bright ORANGE Lava thread! Patchwork Stocking And to take a quick break from quilting, I...

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Greater San Antonio Quilt Show – Winner!

Greater San Antonio Quilt Show – Winner!

on Sep 28, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilting | 8 comments

The Greater San Antonio Quilt Show was this past weekend, Sept 22nd & 23rd. I entered two quilts, and it turned out really well! I was floored. Both quilts are designed and quilted by yours truly. Each quilt has a previously authored blog posts when they were created. I’ll link them for you. Platinum Garden, whole cloth quilt, made with inexpensive satin and polyester components, placed 2nd in its show category, which was “Other/Miscellaneous.” Sorry for the blur; I was excited to snap the picture. My big ole bed-size Scrappy Circles quilt placed Honorable Mention in the “Scrap Quilt” show category. See the little red and pink embroidered boots pinned to each quilt? The quilters takes those off to wear them around the show. Pretty clever, even if I learned about them in the last 1-1/2 hour of the show. Holy smokes! I’m definitely going to try to do that again. I should start planning the next quilt/s now. Thank you for indulging me. The blog is a place to share patterns, quilting ideas, and general design ideas, but I also like to catalog my work & achievements here,...

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Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes

Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes

on Sep 20, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, quilting, tutorial | 9 comments

Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern is a pretty popular free tutorial here on my blog. I decided to create another quilt using the same pattern, but mixing up the background and foreground fabric placement. I’m calling this one the Inverted Disappearing 9-Patch. I’ll show you how easy it is to make this design appear completely different. Check this out! This is the exact same quilt pattern: Scroll up. Seriously, the two above quilts look completely different! Constructing the Quilt In both quilts, I cut my own pile of 10″ fabric squares. These precuts are affectionately known as a Layer Cake, though I believe Moda Fabrics does have the trademark on the actual name. I’ll show you how the inverted design works. In the original pattern the red/blue (foreground) colors were placed in the corners and center. For the alternate version, the foreground colors are placed to make a “plus.” You can see in the photos below, I’ve already done the slashing step. If you are diggin the military uniform in this quilt, you may love the Deploy that Fabric book. It features 23 different patterns to use military uniforms. In the book, there’s a guide as to how to break down a uniform to yield flat workable pieces which will incorporate into your next project or pattern. (***Note: This 9-Patch Quilt is NOT in the book. It is a free tutorial from ReannaLily Designs.) Ok, back to the quilt, following the original Disappearing 9-Patch with Layer Cakes pattern, I simply rotated the upper right and lower left blocks. You’ll notice two little squares meet at the center, that is how you can tell the block layouts are identical. From here, I arranged the HUGE quarter blocks per the original diagram. To actually assemble the quilt I used a serger. As I’ve mentioned before: You can go fast! The serger stitches must faster than my home sewing machine. You don’t need to wind a bobbin. Ever. The seams are wrapped neatly together making them easy to press. This quilt doesn’t require pins or detailed piece-work. Quilting the Patriotic Quilt For many of the red, white, and blue quilts, I like to quilt them quickly featuring a meandering star design....

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Colorado Avalanche Quilt

Colorado Avalanche Quilt

on Jul 31, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery | 1 comment

Every quilt I finish for a customer poses its own unique challenges. This traditional Lone Star Quilt (90″ x 90″) was no different, until we added in the Colorado Avalanche logo* – then the magic happened. My quilt customer brought me this printed image, which I’m certain is owned by the NHL. She wanted me to interpret it onto a quilt, as her son is a HUGE Avalanche fan. I like to draw, so I figured, “Sure, lets quilt the logo!” (or a version of the logo) The first step was developing some kind of template to trace in chalk to allow a total of four logos to appear identical. The design/style notes in green sharpie may not make much sense in the photo, but paired with a traditional quilting fill, the logo will blend right in! I added windy-swirls and snowballs into the large blank spaces of the quilt. The plan is to add them around the logo, as well. Step one was to loosely quilt out the “A” design in navy blue contrasting thread. Then, I needed to add more wind and snowballs around the design to make the “A” stand out. Of course, the bobbin thread coordinates with the top thread for this super-custom design. As luck would have it, I was able to make seven bobbins in maroon before this happened: On the upside, the blue “A” would have blue bobbin thread, so in theory, I had enough. (cough cough cough) My sweet customer provided wide muslin for the back. At first I was so nervous because this meant you could see every single stitch! As time went on and the areas were filled, the muslin turned out really cool. The logo quilt truly was a fantastic challenge! I love how the quilt turned out and thankfully, so did my customer. Thank you for the opportunity to finish your quilts. If you have a quilt that needs finishing, read more at ReannaLilyQuilts.com. *The “A” logo is most certainly owned by the NHL. I don’t claim to own it in any fashion. I simply had a customer who wanted an interpretation of the design on her...

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Customer Quilt Collection

Customer Quilt Collection

on Jul 18, 2017 in Blog, commission, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery | 1 comment

Phew, customer quilts are fantastic! I love that each quilt is so different and poses different quilting challenges & ideas. Thankfully, the work flow has been steady here at ReannaLily Quilts. I thought I’d show you a collection of customer quilts where I’ve finished them with longarm quilting designs. Who doesn’t love a little graffiti quilting in the negative space? The customer asked for this specifically. The quilt was impeccably pieced, too. The next quilt is created from a Moda Layer Cake. The quilt is finished with a free-motion flowery design. A gold thread on the back really complimented the design but wasn’t too stark (high-contrast) to look crazy on the deep purple backing fabric. The next quilt is a quick, large rectangle design. I decided to quilt hooked swirls from edge to edge (e2e) on this one. Check out that wild purple Glide thread! The following quilt is a printed panel that has been cut, framed, and pieced. I finished this design with flowers stitched in green (Seafoam) Glide. Oh, what next? Yes! This next quilt is technically not a quilt; no batting. It is an insanely heavy collection of Guatemalan Mixed Huipile woven shirts. I’m not sure I’m using the word 100% accurately. Just know this collection of woven shirts is easily one of the most colorful things I’ve ever seen! Parts were thick, parts were layered. The customer and I agreed that we didn’t need batting or traditional quilting. Instead, I secured the woven top to the 108″ wide backing with tack stitches, roughly every 6″-8″. The navy tack stitches really fade into the design. (third picture) Last one to share for right now: The giant star. This star is beautiful and I believe it is one of the customer’s first-ever quilts. Yes, first ever and the center point looks fantastic! (Looks like I don’t have a picture of the center, but trust me, FANTASTIC.) Thank you so much for trusting me with  your beautiful quilts! If you need to have your quilt finished, contact me at ReannaLilyQuilts.com or...

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Blue Flying Geese: Queen-Size Quilt

Blue Flying Geese: Queen-Size Quilt

on Jul 9, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Longarm Quilting Gallery, quilt, tutorial | 1 comment

It seems I’m currently obsessed with Giant Flying Geese. The newest queen-size quilt in the Giant Flying Geese collection is created from every blue shade in my own fabric stash. Speaking of fabric stash: Smaller scraps (bigger than 2″ and too small to properly fold to store) sorted by color in ziploc bags. The ziplocs are then stored in a plastic tub. Larger scraps  (big enough to fold, but not a fat quarter OR a big piece that has a weird shape cut out of a portion of it) folded, sorted by color in a plastic tub. Fat Quarters (only the square ones, not actual 1/4 yard cuts) sorted by color in two fabric bins in the cubbies. Ok, so now that we’ve gone through the scraps it was time to cut! 56 squares measuring 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″  NOTE: I created an 8-7/8″ x 8-7/8″ square template from paper to lay over each scrap to determine if it was big enough. Huge time saver! 14 squares measuring 17-1/4″  x 17-1/4″ Since this was scrappy, I knew I wanted scrappy binding. Each time I had a bit extra fabric, I’d cut off a 2-1/4″ x width to use later at the end of the project. I also stored all those in a ziploc bag because I didn’t want to lose them before the quilt was finished. Using the No-Waste Flying Geese Method on this large scale, detailed on the original pattern post, I whipped up 56 flying geese blocks in a weekend. Ok. that is going well. There’s a simple method to planning a quilt this larger without a design wall. Start with 56 geese. Set one random geese block aside. It will not be used at all. Choose five other geese blocks to set aside. These will be added to the quilt, one per column. Sew the remaining 50 geese units together into 25 pairs. Create five total columns featuring five pairs each. Rotate the blocks as you add them to the column. Add in that one remaining block anywhere within the column. Add a border if you like. Ta’dah – super scrappy with no design wall or stress. THAT is how I can finish quilt tops in a...

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