Free-Motion Framework Book Tour Winners

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Thank you!

Thank you for following along with the Free-Motion Framework Social Media Blitzo and Book Tour. I appreciate each of you for stopping by and seeing how this little book came together. Today, I’m happy to announce the three prize winners on ReannaLily Designs stop along the tour.

Just a quick update, if you don’t yet have your copy of the book, the book is rolling along smoothly and is included in the C&T Publishing Best Sellers. Holy smokes! What an honor, y’all!

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

Here’s a quick recap of the tour stops:

Monday | June 4

ReannaLily Designs (here!) 
C & T Publishing

Tuesday | June 5

Joey’s Quilting Co
Helen Ernst Longarm Quilting
Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC The Blog

Thursday | June 7

Wise Craft Handmade

Friday | June 8

Kustom Kwilts
Living Water Quilter
Seamingly Slawson Quilts – Susan Lawson

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Congratulations to our Winners


First Prize

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The first prize includes the following sponsored items:

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The first prize goes to Christi! Her comment is, “I need to improve all of my skills. Ruler work has caught my attention but so has feathers. I haven’t mastered either one. Each day I practice both and dream of improving.” Look for an email soon!


Second Prize

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The first prize includes the following sponsored items:

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The second prize goes to Carol. Her comment is, “I would like to improve the consistency of my stitch length when doing FMQ.” Look for an email soon!


Third Prize

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Free-Motion Framework Blog Hop Book Tour Prize Winners - Jen Eskridge - ReannaLily Designs

The third prize goes to Susan. Her comment is, “I’m struggling in vision. Need a new look.” Look for an email soon!


Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.

Thanks again! You can always read up on the title at these locations, and when on Instagram or Twitter, check out the hashtag #FMFWQ.

 




Free-Motion Framework Launch Party Recap

Free-Motion Framework Launch Party | Jen Eskridge

Free-Motion Framework Launch & Book Signing Party

Thank you to everyone who came out to the Free-Motion Framework Launch & Book Signing Party! I had a great time, even if I’m making crazy faces in these photos. Thank you to Sew Special Quilts SATX for hosting the event.

The many quilts from the book were hanging around the classroom last Friday night. I’m happy to report that as a result, the book inventory sold out before the actual party. The shop was able to get a second order in the day before the event. And to everyone’s delight, the book sold out that night and special orders were placed! Thank you, so much! I am honored that you like the new project.

Free-Motion Framework Launch Party | Jen Eskridge

For the event, I shared different areas of the book and explained how these complicated-looking quilts can be created by simply working in small & symmetrical areas. Also, I may be getting ready to sneeze in this picture below. We’ll never know.

Free-Motion Framework Launch Party | Jen Eskridge

The small mini-quilt, in white, is created from the line drawing above. Choose shapes to fill in with quilting practice designs. If you want to practice straight lines, stitch those. If you want to practice pebbles, meanders, swirls, feathers, etc, stitch those. It is up to you!

Use the lines as a guide! Choose to stitch directly on them to fill in your space, or use them as bounding boxes for your designs. There are so many options.

Free-Motion Framework Launch Party | Jen Eskridge

The designs are offered in 12″, 15″ and 40″ sizes. These smaller sizes can be traced and stitched onto traditional quilts to quilt within a quilt block, stitching directly on the lines. The Circles design is shown below in the 15″ scale. Only a few of the many design lines within the framework are darkened for future quilting onto a block-based quilt. (Thanks, MOM, for holding up the demo items!)

Free-Motion Framework Launch Party | Jen Eskridge

We talked about colors, shapes, sizes, time-frames, processes, threads, and we even have door prizes! Thank you to Clover-USAHandiQuilter, and Hab and Dash Threads for book sponsorship! It was quite a night.

I thought you may enjoy some of the silly faces I make when I’m talking at an event. It happens every time. I did have my daughter snap the pictures, and like many quilt guild events before, it is me with my mouth open or eyebrows furrowed. Turns out: I’m an animated speaker. You should see the bonkers-images that I DIDN’T post. They are pretty much like this:

Free-Motion Framework Launch Party | Jen Eskridge




Free-Motion Framework Book Tour

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Join the Book Tour

As you may know, my new book, Free-Motion Framework was made possible with the help of contributing quilters. A total of 17 quilters, including myself, stitched 41 quilts featured in this inspiring, machine-quilting skill-builder resource. This week we’ll hear from some of them on how the worked with the concept, interpreted their assigned designs, and how their quilts turned out.

Today kicks off the Social Media Blitzo tour for Free-Motion Framework. Stop by the blogs, listed below, to read more about the new title, and when on Instagram or Twitter, check out the hashtag #FMFWQ or #FreeMotionFramework.

The Overview

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Choose one of 10 Framework designs, or one of 12 if you have the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Sheets, to transfer onto your own 40″ square fabric using tips and instructions in the book. From here, prepare the fabric for quilting, as you would any other quilt. Choose shapes from the linear design to fill, symmetrically, with quilting designs. Practice as many design motifs as you like. Each time you create a small project, it will help grow your machine quilting skills and turn out completely different than the one you stitched before.

Note: Build your skills on a domestic or longarm sewing machine.

And, after you’ve practiced and quilted the entire piece, you’ll accidentally turn out a wholecloth quilt. Neat, right?

Longarm Quilting | ReannaLily Designs

I thought it might be fun to share the reasons you may want to keep Free-Motion Framework in your own library, and the “problems” I was trying to solve when I authored the book.

1. Quilting can be expensive.

From machines and fabric to time and planning, quilting is a luxury hobby. For a past-time that started out utilitarian, it has grown to be an amazing creative art form. Turns out, art can get pricey. I wanted to develop a way to quilt without breaking the bank. All the projects in Free-Motion Framework are presented at 40″ x 40″.  You can create a quilt using 1-1/3 yards of fabric, batting, and backing. Even better, if you were to purchase 108″ wide backing, you can create two 40″ pieces from the one back. Sure you can make larger quilts by combining designs or adding a variety of your own border designs to the 40″ square “frames,” but largely the Free-Motion Framework projects can be created at a low cost.

2. I need more practice, but don’t want to commit to a big patchwork quilt.

When a person decides to start machine quilting, especially free-motion quilting, you may find that you need many more practice pieces before diving into your own beloved patchwork project. Often new quilters will take on charity quilts to stitch with one all-over design. We may also quilt bed sheets just for practice. I wanted to practice many quilting motifs while still producing something neat. Unlike practicing a single style on a “real quilt,” Free-Motion Framework presents the opportunity to create more than one fill or quilting design on the same project. By isolating shapes to essentially color in, you can try all sorts of different ideas.

In the two quilts below, notice how, by choosing different design lines/shapes and arranging different types of quilting motifs, the exact same framework, Shark Attack, turns out completely different. Each chapter has four different interpretations of the design by quilters of all skill levels and backgrounds. I think you’ll be surprised with the variety of inspiration.

3. How can I make a wholecloth quilt easily?

I know that sounds crazy, right? The idea of a Wholecloth Quilt by nature doesn’t really give off the EASY vibe. Pre-printed panels exist to create wholecloth quilts, but really, I wanted my own design. I am inspired by the incredibly talented machine quilters who spend months tweaking and perfecting their wholecloth competition quilts on paper then transfer every single stitch to a fabric design.

Do I love the look? Yes.
Would I love to plan something elaborate like that? No way.

The brainstorming began. Fundamentally, many wholecloth designs are symmetrical. Starting there, I decided if I just had some guidelines to work symmetrically, I may be able to turn out something that looks planned. That turned into: If I just had guidelines, I could fill-in whatever I wanted. I just need to remember where I stitched what motif. Using the Goals Worksheets provided with Free-Motion Framework, you’ll be able to write down the notes for the design as well as keep track of what you are practicing on each piece.

Another tip- Save the printed designs to make full-size notes while quilting. I traced a quadrant of a design four times onto fabric. With that quadrant, I loosely draw the designs as I stitch them to remember what to symmetrically stitch on the other areas of the quilt. Remember, this is just a guide, not a masterful drawing.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

4. Quilt with No Pressure

By working small and unplanned, the project takes on a freeing feeling. Working without any outside pressures is a fantastic path to self-growth. Jump in and give it a try. Free-Motion Framework is great for any skill level as everyone has room to improve that one little thing.

  • Hey, this is just 1-1/3 yard of fabric.
  • It’s only practice; no need to worry.
  • This is for my own quilting self-journey, if it turns out, cool. If not, I haven’t invested hundreds of patchwork hours (and CASH) into it.
  • I’ve always wanted to try X-Y-Z design. Let me try it in four or eight small spaces to see if I like it.
  • Rulers have always fascinated me, but I’m not sure where to start. Start one small shape at a time.
  • This will be great to work on at retreat!!! It’s small.

All in all, writing this book from concept to “holy crap that worked” to pitching to the publisher to sourcing all the many contributing quilters, this has been an amazing experience. I hope you’ll enjoy hearing all about the title on this week-long blog hop.

Stop by each blog this week for a possible chance to win a copy of Free-Motion Framework. (International winners, outside the USA, will receive a digital copy.)

Monday | June 4

ReannaLily Designs (here!) 
C & T Publishing

Tuesday | June 5

Joey’s Quilting Co
Helen Ernst Longarm Quilting
Nancy Zieman Productions, LLC The Blog

Thursday | June 7

Wise Craft Handmade

Friday | June 8

Kustom Kwilts
Living Water Quilter
Seamingly Slawson Quilts – Susan Lawson

To be considered for one of the following gifts from our sponsors, leave a comment sharing what area of machine quilting you’d most like to improve. Winners will be randomly selected and notified by email.

Clover USA | ReannaLily Designs

Handi Quilter Rulers | ReannaLily Designs

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

The prize portion of the tour will close at 5pm central time, June 18th and winners will be announced June 19th, right here on ReannaLily Designs Blog. Thank you so much for joining the Blog Tour.

See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the ReannaLily Designs blog.




Free-Motion Framework Special Trunk Show Exhibit

Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts

Free-Motion Framework Quilts Trunk Show!

Take a peek at the Free-Motion Framework Quilt Trunk Show at Sew Special Quilts, in San Antonio, Texas. The show will be installed from May 18 through June 8th. See work from the contributing quilters and myself. If you are in the area or on a short holiday here at the end of May, please swing by!

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Trunk Show

The show features a selection of quilts from the book as well as the three workshop samples and two quilts made from the bonus designs included in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package.

Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts
Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts

Launch Party & Book Signing

In addition, I’m so honored that Sew Special Quilts has offered to not only share the show but also host a Launch Party & Book Signing on June 8, from 6:30-8p. SAVE THE DATE. Bring your copy or pick up one the night of the event. Meet the author (me!), and ask all the questions you like while I demonstrate how to take a simple line drawing and, surprisingly easily, create a version of a wholecloth quilt.

The photo below shows the finished quilt, left, and the line drawing used to create the quilt on the right. I’ll elaborate more at the party or grab your copy of Free-Motion Framework to see how the magic happens.

Free-Motion Framework By Jen Eskridge Trunk Show Quilts

I’ll see you at the party!

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.




Intro to Free-Motion Framework: A New Workshop

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

The new book Free-Motion Framework hits stores in May! A brand new quilting workshop will also be offered. I’m so excited to share the Intro to Free-Motion Framework half-day class.  The spirit of the book focuses on challenging yourself at your own skill level and pace. It gives you an opportunity to reflect and say, “I think I’m going to practice such-and-such quilting design, and maybe also the whatever-whatever design.” Then, take those ideas and practice your quilting design symmetrically to accidentally create a wholecloth quilt.

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Just like the book, the workshop project can be completed on a longarm or domestic home sewing machine. (When booking the workshop, special arrangements may need to be set for hosting a class in a longarm studio.)

In the workshop we’ll mark a solid color fat quarter to create a 15-18″ mini quilt using the same design framework. Just like the 10 linear designs in the book, the Intro design also has its own goals worksheet to give you an opportunity to practice, take notes, and doodle before stitching.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

For the workshop, I created three samples to represent three skill levels who may try the Intro design. Of course, you do not have to make your mini quilt like these at all. Each quilter will likely turn out very different projects. (That is my favorite part!) The challenge levels are associated with these fabric colors:

  • Pink – more advanced
  • Grey – confident
  • White – beginner

In the pictures below, you’ll see the original marked lines on the finished samples. I’m hoping that will give you a reference point as to which shapes were isolated to be quilted.

Pink Mini Quilt

To create the pink mini quilt, I was able simply lay the light-colored fabric on a work surface and trace the design through the fabric.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

The water soluble pencils from Clover work great for this project; keep a pencil sharpener handy.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

I set the fat quarter up on my HandiQuilter Avante longarm frame, though this absolutely can be done on a domestic home sewing machine. (The workshop will be geared towards home-sewing-machine-based free-motion quilting.)

Starting in the center, I isolated a few shapes. I stitched ruler guided straight lines; I echoed design lines; I made feathers; I stitched tiny pebbles.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

From here, I decided I need a bit of “all-over-filler” type designs inside the circle.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

I finished by trying to make a diagonal grid behind the circle. Each quilt is a different challenge for myself. Hopefully showing all three of the same design will give you a few ideas, too.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Grey Mini Quilt

The grey fat quarter fabric was quite a bit more opaque than the pink. To trace the design, I taped the paper template to a window, then taped the fabric over it.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Again, I used the water soluble pencils from Clover.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

To create a design that was less complicated, I decided to isolate less shapes than I did in the pink mini quilt.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T PublishingFree-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

The grey mini quilt only has three total quilting designs.

  • Wishbone lines in the center square
  • Meandering in the four cardinal directions
  • Pebbles in the background

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Side story: Let’s go on record and say Pebbles are not my favorite. I can make them alright, but boy, I always regret stitching them after the first two inches. Who’s with me?

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

Comparing the grey quilt to the pink one, you can see how choosing different shapes and fills makes for a unique challenge each time.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing

White Mini Quilt

As you may have guessed, the white fat quarter was plenty light to see through and trace the Intro design straight onto the fabric without the window/light board set up. For this, the simplest of the three designs, I only have two fill designs: Straight lines and meandering. It stitched up so quickly that I forgot to snap any progress pictures.

Free-Motion Framework Quilts- A Workshop by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts | C&T Publishing


Booking the Workshop

The Free-Motion Framework lecture and workshop are available for quilt guilds, shops, and private groups. Please see this page on my site for more information and contact me directly at reannalilydesigns@gmail.com. I cannot wait to start quilting with you.




Writing a Book- Free-Motion Framework

Bound Quilts | ReannaLily Designs

Early last year I shared a blog post vaguely mentioning my “Secret Quilting Project.” I’m happy to report I can finally elaborate on the details and explain how the logistics of authoring Free-Motion Framework went down. From timeline to work-load, here’s how it happened:

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

In late 2016, I pitched a concept to C&T Publishing to feature 10 linear designs created to help you improve your machine quilting skills while accidentally producing a wholecloth quilt.  The concept was well received. I have to say myself, I hadn’t seen anything like it in the quilting community, either. That was great news!

The publishing team and acquisitions folks chatted with me about how broad the scope would be and how much it would take to write the book. When I say “how much,” I don’t mean money; I mean time.  We discussed release-dates and other planning events way back in the fall of 2016.

My book, Free-Motion Framework, was in the incubator a bit longer than a usual book for two main reasons:

  1. My sweet husband deployed for half of 2017, and I knew I wouldn’t be able to be a quilt-author-maniac while holding down the fort.
  2. The book coordinates the efforts of generous sponsors and 17 different contributing quilters. That is a TON of quilters. Spreadsheets galore!

Once that was ironed out, I was emailing my dream-team of quilters by November. Just like hosting a party, you throw out invitations and hope everyone can attend, but realistically some folks have other commitments and a few may have to cancel their RSVP’s.  Most quilters stitched two different design projects in the book. Others volunteered to quilt three. I think I personally quilted 10 or 11. I’d have to go back and re-count.

Next up, reaching out to the amazing sponsors who provided products to help make this book a reality. Lots of emailing and lots of spreadsheets.  Thank you to these generous folks:

Fairfield Batting

Fairfield Batting | ReannaLily Designs

Clover USA

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

HandiQuilter

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Hab And Dash (previously Bobbin Central/Fil Tec)

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

And don’t forget the amazing fabric sponsors. This book was much trickier for me to plan fabric than my previous books.

In previous books, I’d design a quilt, and say “Hum, this quilt pattern needs 2 yards of blue, 10 fat quarters from this-that-matches-blue, and 6 yards of backing.” Easy stuff. For this book, I had to think, “Wait, I’m going to present a whole collection of squares, and I need the colors to match, or coordinate, or at the very least not bore anyone reading.” Yet another spreadsheet was born. Here’s a peek. Excel Spreadsheet for Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

I looked at fabric company’s websites to find beautiful anchor fabrics. From there, I decided to choose all the wholecloth color pieces from that anchor fabric. Each chapter, which is also each linear design, is coordinated by backing fabric (aka the anchor). All four quilt concepts in the chapter have the same binding, which helps tie them together and keep them organized for me and the publishing team.

Big thank you to:

My company, ReannaLily Designs, isn’t sponsored by any single fabric company, which made it easier and wonderful to work with five different companies to provide variety and selection when assembling this concept. Thank you, thank you!

Ok, with quilters assembled and supplies procured, I then needed to sort, mark, and ship everything to my team. This happened right before Christmas in 2016.

Shipping Boxes | ReannaLily Designs

 

Early 2017 was spent feverishly quilting and writing. I also needed to write the organize book, decided on some specific things that you’ll see in the table of contents, and create my work in Adobe Illustrator.

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

 

Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

All quilts were returned, with contributor notes, by mid February 2017. By June the entire thing was authored and ready to send to the publisher for them to wave a magic editing-wand over the whole thing. I mailed digital files, quilts, tools, thread, paper files, more straight pins identifying samples than I care to think of, and more. It was a HUGE endeavor to get those boxes to the post office.

The final edits by the publishing team (and then a micro-tiny bit by me) were all done around Christmas 2017, with the book heading to print in early 2018. It has been a long time, but all-in-all an amazing time.  I think you will love the way the book is arranged. It is better than I could have imagined, and I’m so glad to have worked with such an accomplished group at C&T Publishing.

One cool thing about the book is that the 10 linear designs are included for download once you purchase the book. I was originally thinking a CD would be included, but y’all, that is SOOOOO 2015. Evidently everything is cloud/internet based, which is awesome. But if you were thinking you’d like to have a copy of the actual paper patterns along with your book, C&T Publishing also assembled a pattern package which includes two additional BONUS linear designs.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

It was an incredible process. I can safely say, I would love to do it again. (wink wink) But for now, watch this blog for even more details on the release of Free-Motion Framework.

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.

 




Introducing Free-Motion Framework by Jen Eskridge

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T PublishingFree-Motion Framework is finally here!!!

Free-Motion Framework is my newest book releasing with C & T Publishing. I’m beyond excited to share the concept and details with you over the coming weeks.

In a nutshell, the book is 10 linear designs created to help you improve your machine quilting skills while accidentally producing a wholecloth quilt. Sounds a bit crazy, right?

I started out wanting to create a wholecloth quilt but soon realized there’s no way I wanted to plan a wholecloth quilt. It became clear that if I simply had a few guidelines marked, I could quilt whatever I felt comfortable-enough stitching and, as long as I worked symmetrically, I’d probably turn out a really neat quilt.

The design is a bonus pattern in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package.

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here, on the blog.

C & T  Publishing’s blog has a more in-depth look at the book, with excerpts from the title in their new blog post.

To create this book, I worked with the aforementioned 10 linear designs, which I created in Adobe Illustrator. I then reached out to other machine quilters to assemble a team of 17 total quilters to create the 41 quilts featured in the book. Yes, FORTY-ONE quilts (not including any digital mock-ups).

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack Design by Jen Eskridge

Each design is presented in it’s full square composition, and a quadrant of the design is presented. Then each linear design is stitched four times, by four different quilters using as many or as few lines as they’d like to fill in shapes with machine quilting designs which they feel comfortable stitching. For this reason, this skill builder is great for ALL levels of machine quilters.

Take a look at these interpretations of the Shark Attack design:

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Jen Eskridge

 

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Joanna Marsh

 

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Jen Eskridge

 

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Shark Attack: Quilted by Geraldine Wilkins

This book will be a fantastic resource for machine quilting textures, as created by the army of quilting contributors, as well as a good go-to for low-stress machine quilting practice ideas. I hope you’ll add it to your library.

There will be more details on this book in the coming weeks. I will share more sneak-peeks at the designs, the concept, the writing process, and more. For now, though, know the book ships in May and is available for pre-order hereAsk for it at your local book store and quilt shop!

Free-Motion Framework on Instagram

Look for some of the designs on Instagram under the hashtag #FMFWQ

Images in this blog post are provided by C&T Publilshing.

 




Buggin Out: Machine Quilted Wholecloth

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt

Another practice wholecloth quilt came to being over the winter break. I challenged myself with purple Glide thread on orange cotton fabric. Yikes! At first it seemed a bit counter-intuitive, but I really wanted to have high contrasting colors so I could focus on making better stitches, lines, and curves.

I used HandiQuilter Avante 18″ longarm to create the quilt. The whole thing is stitched using free-motion quilting and rulers. There’s no computer guided quilting.

Design

As you may know, I’m enjoying a quilting series of whole cloth quilts, like the one in this wholecloth post, this wholecloth post, and Platinum Garden, which will be seen at Road to California January 2018. As described in those previous adventures, I start with a linear quadrant design like this one:

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Print the quadrant once, tape it together, and trace it onto the wholecloth four times, or simply print it four times. I opted to just print the full-size quadrant once. Note: This quadrant design is not available for free full-size download. The design is a bonus pattern in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

For more on this style of quilting, using a linear design/framework to accidently stitch a wholecloth quilt, check out Free-Motion Framework.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here.

Once the design is traced, I isolate shapes to fill in. As long as I fill them in symmetrically, I’ll get a cool wholecloth quilt. It will look like I took time to plan this quilt, but really, I just made notes of what I stitched in each shape and repeated the design in all four quadrants.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

I was be-bopping along at a good clip when I remembered to take pictures! I had the good sense to draw what I stitched, as I stitched it, on the full-size paper tracing template. It was so easy to use it as a reference. It doesn’t look like much, but here’s a peek:

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

The entire quilt is traced with a blue water soluble marker. Spray the quilt with water while it is still on the frame to see all the marks disappear.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Of course, if I were planning to block this quilt so it will lay/hang  perfectly square, the marker could be removed at that step.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

I wanted to try to snap a few different angles of the high-contrast thread. This is the center of the entire quilt. Though the original design has points converging at the center, I opted to add a big circle to cover that area. I don’t think my straight line ruler stitches would have matched. Maybe on the next practice quilt.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Filling in shapes with different densities is my favorite. It makes the piece look like it has actual light and dark values achieved only through thread.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Goals

Here are a few of my quilting goals with this design:

  • Practice 1/4″ pebbles or pearls
  • Practice regular pebbling as a filler design
  • Practice having straight lines converge on a point
  • Vary densities

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Trimming the quilt is definitely an area where I need more practice. I’ll add that to my next quilt’s goal list. I think it will be much more helpful on my next time, if I trace out exactly where the edge of the quilt will fall. I really want to create designs where I do no accidentally need to chop off parts of those rascally feathers.

I’ll also be adding “work on starts-and-stops” to my next quilt’s goals, too. Each project lets me practice and learn more about what I’m stitching.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

When you look at the quilt straight-on, it turned out pretty cool. The Buggin Out element I had envisioned turned into scissor handles, but that’s all up to interpretation.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Backing

Backing is pieced from extra wide backs leftover from previous quilts. I put zero thought into the backing, as you can see. For these smaller 40″ square designs, they will likely be wall hanging size, so the back isn’t as important to me. That is just me, though.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

The bobbin thread is Superior Bob pre-wound bobbins in white. You can see the quilting has a different feel with out the in-your-face purple.

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

Binding

The second-to-last step is always binding. For the first time, I cut my binding strips only 2″ wide. My binding is machine applied to the back, and machine finished from the front. It made a very narrow and tidy finish to this wholecloth design.

My label is a short, hand-written scribble in Micron Pen .05 onto the backing fabric to say:

  • My name
  • Date
  • City
  • Quilt name

Buggin Out Wholecloth Quilt Design | Free-Motion Framework | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs | ReannaLily Quilts

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.




Platinum Garden: Satin Wholecloth Quilt

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I’m crazy for this platinum satin whole cloth quilt! It is named Platinum Garden and started out as a wild experiment. A 60″ x 60″ quilting adventure! What I wanted was one of those amazing silk wholecloth quilts with the puffy and fantastic wool battings. Upon further inspection – YIKES – silk is almost $30/yard and wool batting isn’t for the faint of heart. (I couldn’t commit at those prices.) Since this was to be a test, I went with polyester, “platinum” color satin charmeuse and high-loft polyester batting. To top it off, I actually used a bed sheet (50/50% poly cotton) from Walmart as the backing! Pretty crazy, right?

As you may know, I’m enjoying a quilting series of whole cloth quilts, like the one in this wholecloth post and this wholecloth post.  As described in those previous adventures, I start with a linear quadrant design like this one:

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Print the quadrant once, tape it together, and trace it onto the wholecloth four times, or simply print it four times. I opted to just print the full-size quadrant once. Note: This quadrant design is not available for free full-size download. The design is a bonus pattern in the Free-Motion Framework Pattern Package.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

For more on this style of quilting, using a linear design/framework to accidently stitch a wholecloth quilt, check out Free-Motion Framework.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here.

Since I was using slippery & shifty satin, I decided to use dressmaker’s carbon tracing papers to transfer the design to the quilt’s surface.

Of course, I started in right away on the quilting.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Some feathers here. Some lines there.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

A few wishbones in the corners.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Then I realized this quilt was WAY too big and to slippery to roll back and forth to work in a symmetrical quilting fashion. Instead, I decided to draw directly on my printed quadrant to serve as a road map for what I was going to quilt when I needed to replicate the top half of the quilt, on the bottom half. I pinned it above my quilt frame as a reference. (I’m going to have lots of holes to patch on that wall if we ever move!)

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

As I would stitch an area, I’d run over to the quadrant and doodle out what I just did. I don’t want you to think I actually, really planned something. Ha. You can see the cheap bed sheet backing in the photo below, too.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Wowsa. It is coming along. For some reason, those flower petals in the middle gave me fits thinking of how to fill them.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

When in doubt, add more feathers! That’s gonna be my new rule. You can really see the PINK Glide thread in this picture, above.

Like the other quilts I’ve made in this design series, each time the quilt comes off the frame there’s a whole “Holy Quilting, Batman! I cannot believe I made that!” moment. It really is a neat way to trick yourself. Simply isolate a shape in the design, quilt it, and make it symmetrical. Who knows what your quilt will look like in the end? Everyone loves surprises.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

I thought the satin would be far too difficult to apply as a traditional quilt binding. My options were apply lightweight interfacing to it as you would in apparel sewing, OR simple add a facing to the whole quilt and skip the traditional binding all together. I went with the latter. Would you like to see some close-up shots of the quilting?

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily DesignsPlatinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

And a couple outdoorsy shots with overcast lighting.

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Platinum Garden | Whole Cloth Quilt by Jen Eskridge | ReannaLily Designs

Is it perfect? Nope.

Do I love it far more than I should? Absolutely!

The experiment is confirmed. That totally worked. Now, to start saving my pennies for the silk and wool.

 

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

 




Longarm Quilting Skill Builder – With Circles

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Whole Cloth Quilting Skill Builder
Now with CIRCLES

I recently created a little tutorial for a whole cloth quilting skill builder design. You can find that post here. It was a really fun project where you take a template, which?you can download, trace out all the lines onto your fabric, then quilt different fill designs within spaces. Sounds pretty straight-forward, right? Well, I decided to develop a second template. (I can see me going down a rabbit hole…. )

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here.

With both skill builder designs I wanted to have a small quilt to practice:

  • Filling in shapes with different designs
  • Consistency in the filling motifs
  • Ruler work
  • Speed & Confidence

The Template

The template is designed in Adobe Illustrator and fits on a 40″ square of fabric. The design itself is 38-1/2″ x 38-1/2″. The plan was to make a quilt that is big enough to practice on and small enough to not have a large financial commitment. Does that make sense? It is 1-1/8 yard of fabric. I used pieced batting scraps inside the design and pieced some scraps for the quilt back.

I also chose this size for my whole cloth because it would be easy enough to trace out four designs to create a much larger bed-size quilt.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

That is pretty neat, right? However, there’s no way I wanted to print a bunch of pages, tape them together and have a 38-1/2″ piece of paper. Designing just a quadrant solved the problem. Hooray! It prints on only 6 pages. Click here to download the quadrant pdf for yourself.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Using the whole cloth skill builder design:

Print the quadrant and choose to “tile pages” to print 6 pieces of paper on a pc or do this for a mac.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Fold your fabric in half lengthwise and width-wise to find the center and mark the exact vertical and horizontal guide lines. Press.

Tape or pin the printed design quadrant to a wall (or use window to act as a light board).

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Align the pressed vertical and horizontal lines with the edges of the quadrant. My fabric is light, so I can still see the lines though the weave.

Trace all the design lines onto the fabric using a?water soluble marker.I know the picture has a whole lotta blue coming at ya. Sorry about that. Blue fabric. Blue pen. Blue lines. Oh my!

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

To trace the entire design, remove the fabric. Turn it 90 degrees and trace the quadrant again. Repeat this step to finish out the design. Remember to align the folded centers with each rotation.

For this second skill builder sample, I only traced and stitched one quadrant. (And yeah, probably should have ironed my fabric first.)

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Deciding to Quilt

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

With the small quilt loaded onto my Handi Quilter Avante 18″, I decided to start in the upper left corner. If this was a whole radial design, I would have started in the center and worked my way out.

You can certainly use this template with any quilting style. Domestic machine quilting, hand quilting or longarm quilting.

Using rulers to guide me, stitched directly on a few of the blue marked lines first.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

I started by wanting to make some kind of wild feather in the upper left. As it turns out, I didn’t like the feather much and thought I could “save” it by quilting very densely around it, still within my marked lines. That is not my favorite.

I also tried my hand at straight lines converging on a point. Eh. Those are alright, I guess. It is a skill builder, after all.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

I used my?Creative Memories Circle Cutter, from 10 years ago, (instead of a ruler) to stitch out my circle shapes. The cutting system is the perfect height to use with my machine foot.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Once I had the circles in place, I decided my planned/stitched shapes needed some altering. No problemo-?seam ripper to the rescue.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

That is the beauty of the no-pressure, no-real-plan whole cloth skill builder. If you don’t like something, don’t stitch it. If you want bigger shapes, make ’em. Easy stuff. Dive in!

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. Those fills within the circle look a bit lumpy, but they were really fun to make.

Next, I wanted to try some curved cross-hatch quilting designs. I found a perfect spot for some of those. Each fill is just a few square inches. That is a really comfortable easy approach to making this whole cloth. For me, it certainly beats feeling overwhelmed with an intricate & planned design.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

The design is coming together.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. Now I needed to fill in (what would have been) the cool center section. I had stitched feathers and an arrow shape of?”C’s,” all based on marked lines.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Oooh- now to do something more with my circle rulers. I needed to practice them more so I decided to “echo” the arch a bit. I filled in with fat 1″ pebbles. Those… well, it is?a skill builder…

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

I moved back to the top and left sides to add in more “C’s” and more feathers.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. so here’s how the whole thing came together:

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

From way back here, it looks pretty cool. I totally wish I had traced all four quadrants.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Here it is side-by side with the template. It might give you an idea of which lines I opted to use and which lines I bailed on.

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

And because I love Photoshop?& wished I had done the whole quilt design, I went ahead and roughly made myself a virtual quilt.Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.comWhole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

Ok. Now that I love. I’m going to have to make this one again. (I will not be doing that dense fill around that feather wedge though. That looks a bit crazy to me, but there’s no way I’m pulling out those stitches.)

Whole Cloth Quilting Design Template | Skill Builder | Jen Eskridge | ReannaLilyQuilts.com

One of the coolest parts about the skill builder quadrant is it will be different each time anyone makes it. Pick and choose whatever lines you want to follow. Fill with whatever designs you are working on at the time. Go as detailed or as loose as you feel comfortable. I just love it. It is a choose your own adventure book for longarm quilting.

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFW. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

If you give it a go, I’d love to see it!

And lastly, I noticed when I did the first skill builder, I was able to practice a design/fill at least four times (making all four quadrants) and by that last space my fill started looking good. You know, the way practice is supposed to work. I think by only doing one quadrant this time, I didn’t get the full practice in each design. Always learning, right?




Longarm Quilting Skill Builder

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Small Whole Cloth Quilting Skill Builder

I love to look at whole cloth quilts, but I’d need some serious skills to be able to make one! I decided I should make a skill builder design for myself to practice my longarm quilting. Specifically, I wanted to practice:

  • Filling in shapes with different designs
  • Consistency in the filling motifs
  • Ruler work
  • Speed & Confidence

First steps in Adobe Illustrator.

The design I’m sharing with you today will finish at?38″ square. I figured this way it would be a small enough piece to not agonize over, but larger enough to apply to quadrants of a quilt if I wanted to make a bed size quilt. (Well, it’d have to have borders to really be bed-size, but that is neither here nor there.) Ok- page set up 38″ square. In a nutshell- draw a line this way, pull a curve that way, rotate around a center mark…. Ta’dah! Well, it wasn’t THAT easy, I made a rough draft, tested it, tweaked it and then TA’DAH – the image below.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

That is pretty neat, right? Then I realized that there’s no way I wanted to print a bunch of pages, tape them together and have a 38″ piece of paper. Designing just a quadrant solved the problem. Hooray! It prints on only 6 pages. Click here to download the quadrant pdf for yourself.

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFWQ. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing

Updated to add: See all the Free-Motion Framework details, workshops, projects, and samples here.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Let me show you how I used my whole cloth skill builder design:

((I was working from the rough draft illustrator design so the design lines vary slightly. ))

Print the quadrant and choose to “tile pages” to print 6 pieces of paper on a pc or do this for a mac.

First, I found a piece of fabric roughly 1-1/4″ x 42″ (width of fabric). Fold it in half lengthwise and width-wise to find the center and mark the exact vertical and horizontal guide lines. Press.

Tape or pin the printed design quadrant to a wall (or use window to act as a light board).

Align the pressed vertical and horizontal lines with the edges of the quadrant. My fabric is light yellow, so I can still see the lines though the weave.

Trace all the design lines onto the fabric using a?water soluble marker.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Remove the fabric. Turn it 90 degrees and trace the quadrant again. Repeat this step to finish out the design.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Deciding to Quilt

In hindsight, I probably should have added 2″ basting stitches across the entire quilt before beginning. Having skipped that step, I’ll say – What the heck, it turned out ok for a first try!!! =)

I started in the middle of the design by tracing four shapes that joined in the center. If you are planning on doing this on your own- it doesn’t matter which shapes you start with.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Using rulers to guide me, stitched directly on the blue marked lines first. I tested the ole skills by trying to stitch 1/4″ away from the original line. Then I decided I’d pick something fun and curvy to fill in my first four shapes.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Ok. That wasn’t so bad. By the 4th shape, the lines were really starting to fall where I wanted them…. as opposed to the first shape.

Next, I wanted to try to make super straight ruled lines as a fill. Ok, just gotta find a shape and outline it first.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Little chunks like this with no real big commitment or plan really helped me out. For example: The space I chose to add ruled lines, well, there were 8 symmetrical spaces for a total of probably 12 square inches. I can handle 12 square inches, right??

I continued on in this fashion: Which little line cluster can I outline and fill? Ok. Next. Ok, which little line cluster can I outline and fill?

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Here’s a fun fact: Yes, that IS a Creative Memories Circle Cutter from 10 years ago! I do all my family photobooks digitally, nowadays.?I happen to still have this perfect-size circle and oval cutting system. Turns out the plastic is the ideal height for round longarm rulers. You are welcome.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

You’ll notice that I didn’t stitch on every blue line. I was really trying to just isolate “shapes I wanted to fill” and that was the plan.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

If one of the skills you are trying to build is speed, do not choose pebbles. bwhahahaha. Stinkin’ pebbles.

Here’s a view from under the machine.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

Oh man. There are some lumpy parts (noticeable only to me), but I don’t even care. I love this thing!

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

After three days of hopping on the longarm intermittently to fill a few shapes at a time, it was finally time to take off the water soluble ink.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

And here’s the craziest part that I didn’t anticipate- Since this was fill-this-on-a-whim type quilting, I had no idea what it would really look like when it was done. It was a total HGTV reveal moment for me! “Oh my gosh, I cannot believe this is the same fabric.” -kind of reveal. Unlike HGTV, I didn’t cry or cut to commercial break with a suspenseful sentence.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

One of the coolest parts about the skill builder quadrant is it will be different each time anyone makes it. Pick and choose whatever lines you want to follow. Fill with whatever designs you are working on at the time. Go as detailed or as loose as you feel comfortable. I just love it. It is a choose your own adventure book for longarm quilting.

Free Motion Quilting | Longarm Quilting | Whole Cloth Quilt Design by Jen Eskridge

If you give it a go, I’d love to see it!

If you make a wholecloth skill builder like this one and share it, please use the hashtag #FMFW. Why you ask? This concept has grown into a full-on book, Free-Motion Framework, shipping May of 2018. Pre-order it on AMAZON.

Free-Motion Framework Machine Quilting Skill Builder Book | Wholecloth book | Jen Eskridge | C&T Publishing